Thinking aloud on one of today’s cases

From what information I have (which isn’t very much), the disappearance of Brian Lee Drew is pretty puzzling. He went missing three years ago from his home in Tucson, Arizona.

Drew’s NamUs page makes it look like he could have left of his own accord; he “mentioned going to Mexico to help feed the hungry.” But if he did, he left his vehicle and most of his stuff behind. I don’t know how he would have gotten to Mexico without those things.

If he did indeed cross the border there should be a record of that. NamUs said his wallet disappeared with him, but what about his passport? He should have needed one to cross the border — although I’m aware that American border officials are much more concerned about keeping people out than keeping people in.

His Facebook page is puzzling. In one of his last posts, less than a week before he went missing, he writes:

drewfacebook

I don’t know if he really was at risk or if he was just paranoid.

As is often the case, his Facebook was a rich source of photos of him, and photos of his tattoos as well. He had a bunch of them.

I hope he is alive and well and decides to contact his family soon.

Make-a-List Monday: Irish people

So it’s March, and St. Patrick’s Day is soon, and I thought I’d do this list of Charley Project MPs who are from Ireland. There are a lot of Irish immigrants to the US, even now.

  1. Kieran Burke: not an immigrant but a tourist who disappeared on a trip to Yosemite National Park
  2. Patrick J. Fitzpatrick: assume he’s an immigrant because it says he has an Irish accent
  3. Micheal Fergus Griffin
  4. John Lawrence McMeel: again, it says he has an Irish accent so I assume he’s from there
  5. Kieran A. Murphy and his wife Ornaith Murphy
  6. Hugh Martin Nolan
  7. John Patrick Rowan Jr.
  8. Daniel Gerard Ryan

Bonus cases:

  1. Stephen Joseph Davaris traveled to Ireland AFTER his disappearance and probably met his death there. A sad case.
  2. Annie Bridget McCarrick was an American who emigrated to Ireland and disappeared there. A former IRA member is actually a suspect in her disappearance.

Black History Month: Tageana Griffith

In honor of Black History Month I’m profiling one African-American MP every day on this blog for the month of February. Today’s case is Tageana Elizabeth Griffith, who was abducted by her non-custodial mother from Niagara Falls, New York on June 13, 2010, at the age of five. She is now 13 years old.

Tageana was born in Jamaica, but lived in the U.S. at the time of her disappearance. Her parents had joint custody. The court confiscated Tageana’s passport after her mother, Patricia, took her to Jamaica for a “vacation” without permission. Pretty much right after the passport was returned, Patricia took Tageana back to Jamaica again and this time came back without her.

(Incidentally, most major airlines in the U.S. now have a rule that if a minor child is traveling out of the country with only one parent, not both of them, this parent has to produced signed and notarized permission for the trip from the other parent, or proof that they have full custody rights, in order to fly. That’s to prevent stuff like Tageana’s abduction from happening.)

Patricia was sentenced to 18 months for parental abduction. The authorities believe Tageana is living with her maternal grandmother in Jamaica, but they can’t find them. Meanwhile her father has been looking for her for almost eight years now. All he’s got are some pics of her taken on her tenth birthday, five years after she was kidnapped.

Black History Month: Irene Kouame

In honor of Black History Month I’m profiling one African-American MP every day on this blog for the month of February. Today’s case is Irene Kouame, a seventeen-year-old girl who disappeared from Pasadena, California on August 23, 2001. She’s from the sub-Saharan African nation of Cote d’Ivoire aka the Ivory Coast, and was in the U.S. on an exchange program.

Irene is classified as a runaway. Perhaps she simply didn’t want to return to her home county, a third-world nation that saw a coup in 1999 and, after her disappearance, two civil wars inside of a decade.

Irene would be 33 years old today.

A very sad conversation I wish I hadn’t had to have

Yeah, so I’m home again. I got a text from Mom saying she’d be home around noon and after I fed her cat I could just leave if I liked. So I did.

Last night I had to have a very sad conversation, via text, with the mother of a teenage girl who ran away years ago and is still missing.

You see, when I first added this woman’s daughter to Charley, I had written a blog entry about two runaways: one who had been found alive and well in Canada (whom I did not name, since she had never been on Charley and she was not missing anymore and I wanted to protect her privacy), and the other being this woman’s daughter.

Then yesterday the woman commented on my entry saying “I’m so-and-so’s mother and I had no idea she was even alive until I read this entry. Please text me at the following number and tell me everything you know.” (I have since deleted her comment, because it had her phone number on it.)

And I realized to my horror that she had misunderstood my entry and thought I had been referring to one person, not two: in other words, she thought I was saying I had located her daughter in Canada and she was alive and well.

So then I had to text her and explain that I was very sorry but she had misunderstood me and I didn’t have any more idea about her kid’s whereabouts and well-being than she did. I felt absolutely terrible for raising her hopes for five minutes and then having to break them.

It turns out that, unbeknownst to me, this woman’s daughter had left a note saying she was running away to Canada. That’s probably a good part of the reason why she misunderstood my blog entry.

The thing is, her daughter could very possibly be dead. It’s more likely than in the average runaway case. She suffers from a very serious medical condition which, even with treatment, still kills people. And of course, as a runaway, she doesn’t have her medication with her or access to her doctors.

Fortunately the girl’s mother wasn’t angry at me, but I felt really bad. We texted back and forth for awhile. I kept telling her how sorry I was that I couldn’t be of more help. She told me a little about her daughter. I think I’ll add this info to the girl’s Charley Project page.