AP/picture dump

Got some new age-progressions and new pictures for you, also middle names:

Arrest in Tara Grinstead case

In a major breakthrough, a suspect has been charged with murder in the 2005 disappearance of Tara Faye Grinstead, who vanished from Ocilla, Georgia. Her case has been very high profile over the years. The alleged killer, Ryan Alexander Duke, had been a student at the school where Tara taught, but graduated three years before she vanished. And he wasn’t a suspect, wasn’t even “on the radar” as far as the investigation was concerned, until quite recently.

Until I update her case (probably later today), content yourself with the following articles:

Missing persons news

I’ll cover the recovery of the Yates girls in their own entry, but here’s some other missing persons news:

  • This accountant’s hobby? Identifying missing people through his drawings
    My friend and Irregular Carl Koppelman has been featured in the Orange County Register. He does wonderful sketches of UIDs and was instrumental in identifying Cali Doe as Tammy Alexander. Congratulations, Carl!
  • Trial date in 20-year-old cold case pushed back to October
    A year and a quarter ago ago, more or less, Kirsten Renee Hatfield‘s two-doors-down neighbor was charged with her murder. The headline of this article is pretty self-explanatory, and the news story explains why: the suspect has new lawyers now who need time to review the evidence.
    Kirsten’s case, for whatever reason, fascinated me back when I was a child and first started getting interested in missing persons. I had a website when I was twelve or so, with some poems and stories I wrote, and one of them was a poem called “Missing, Presumed Dead” and it was based on Kirsten’s disappearance, as I explained on the site. Kirsten’s mom found it and emailed me, saying she was touched that a little girl in Ohio was thinking of her and her lost daughter, but she didn’t believe Kirsten was dead.
  • Judge orders suspect in cold case homicide to trial in district court
    Apparently the motive for Cari Lea Farver‘s homicide was a love triangle; both she and the suspect, Shanna Goylar, were seeing the same man. According to prosecutors, after Goylar killed Cari, she burned the body and then went on Cari’s social media accounts and tried to make it look like she was still alive.
  • Missing Oklahoma woman found more than 20 years after disappearance
    This case isn’t one of mine. It’s a really awesome story, though, how hard Shelly Jennings’s daughters looked for her, and how she was found largely through their efforts. Twenty-three years after she walked away from her family in Oklahoma, she turns up at a bus station in Modesto, California. I hope they can reconcile, although given Shelly’s mental illness, this may not be possible.
  • For families of missing persons, not knowing is excruciating
    This is about the disappearance of Cody Henry Turner, who went missing from Washington in 2015.
  • Missing Minnesotans: Susan Swedell
    Obviously, an article about Susan Anne Swedell (for whom I recently posted an updated AP).

Make-a-List Monday: Older children where a parent is suspected

This list is for kids over the age of ten where one or both of the child’s parents (or step-parents, or guardians) is a suspect or possible suspect in their disappearance, or the circumstances indicate they could be involved. I’m not talking about family abduction cases, I mean cases where they think the parent killed the child. I’m including murder-without-a-body cases.

Child abuse and neglect occurs at all ages, of course, but it’s my understanding that child abuse deaths in older kids are relatively rare. I don’t know much about this sort of thing but my guess would be it’s because older kids are both less fragile and more capable of defending themselves than infants and toddlers.

I’m grouping these kids in alphabetical order by age, and the suspect is in parentheses. In a lot of these cases, other family members — siblings or a parent — are also missing.

  1. Sheketah Michele Brown, 10 (father)
  2. Shakeima Ann Cabbagestalk, 10 (stepfather)
  3. Kristopher Charles Loesch, 10 (mother and mother’s girlfriend)
  4. Reagan Cordell Uden, 10 (stepfather)
  5. Karen Zhou, 10 (stepfather)
  6. Haleigh Breann Culwell, 11 (stepfather)
  7. Richard Lee Haynes Jr., 11 (father and stepmother)
  8. Adam Joseph Herrman, 11 or 12 (adoptive parents)
  9. Barry James Kephart II, 11 (father)
  10. Billy Sena, 11 (mother’s live-in boyfriend)
  11. Richard Loren Uden, 11 (stepfather)
  12. Terry Lee Westerfield, 11 (stepfather)
  13. Debra Jean Cole, 12 (mother’s live-in boyfriend)
  14. Crystal Gayle Dittmeyer, 12 (stepfather)
  15. Ivy Matory, 12 (stepfather)
  16. Jaliek L. Rainwalker, 12 (adoptive father)
  17. Doreen Jane Vincent, 12 (father)
  18. Melinda Karen Creech, 13 (mother)
  19. Kelly Jean Harris, 13 (stepfather)
  20. Rachel Marie Mellon, 13 (stepfather)
  21. Rachanda Lea Pickle, 13 (stepfather)
  22. Ricky Lane Thomas Jr., 13 (stepfather)
  23. Aundria Michelle Bowman, 14 (adoptive father)
  24. Toni Lynn McNatt-Chiappetta, 14 (father)
  25. Christina Marchell Richart, 14 (foster mother; her biological uncle’s wife)
  26. Monique Christine Daniels, 15 (stepfather)
  27. Tammy Sue Rothganger, 15 (stepfather)
  28. Jason Sims Jr., 15 (parents)
  29. Bethany Anne Sinclair, 15 (mother’s live-in boyfriend)
  30. Joyce Irene Cogburn, 15 (male temporary guardian)
  31. William Dale Gunn, 15 (stepfather)
  32. Josephine Yvette Cogburn, 16 (male temporary guardian)
  33. Margarette Ann Cuauhtli, 16 (adoptive father)
  34. Mindi Chambers, 17 (father)
  35. Alissa Marie Turney, 17 (stepfather; legally adopted her)

Honorable mention: Richard Gorham, 11. His mother’s live-in boyfriend is a suspect in his disappearance. However, Richard was living with his grandfather, Roland Himebrook, when he went missing. Himebrook disappeared too.

Let’s talk about it: Stephanie and Edward Hunsberger

This was a case suggested by a reader: the 1978 disappearances of Stephanie Hunsberger (nee Smith) and her husband, Edward Hale Hunsberger, who were 24 and 30 respectively when they vanished from Northwales, Pennsylvania on February 25 of that year.

The Hunsbergers were drug addicts and in pretty deep; Stephanie even occasionally worked as a prostitute to support her heroin habit. Both of them were in a methadone program at the time they went missing. After Stephanie missed one of her methadone clinic appointments, the staff contacted her father, Jay Smith, and asked if he knew where she was. He said he was trying to detox her himself with Placidyl (a prescription sedative with recreational uses; it’s no longer on the market) and “really good pot.” Neither of the Hunsbergers ever went back to the methadone clinic, and it was assumed they had relapsed.

After that, things get murky.

Read the couple’s casefiles for details on what a weirdo Stephanie’s father was. Suffice it to say that, although he had a doctorate and a respectable job as principal of Upper Merion High School, on his downtime he committed a series of armed robberies, and after his arrest in August 1978, the police found a TON of drugs at his house. He bonded out awaiting trial. He was later sentenced to five years.

Smith was later convicted of three counts of murder in the deaths of Susan Reinert, an employee at the school where he was principal, and her two children, Karen and Michael. Susan was murdered in June 1979, in a fairly unusual way — she was beaten severely, but she survived for about 24 to 36 hours afterwards, and the actual cause of death was a morphine overdose. Karen and Michael disappeared with their mom and the bodies were never found.

The police believed the murders were orchestrated by Susan’s boyfriend Bill Bradfield, an Upper Merion High School teacher, for money, but that Jay Smith actually committed the killings. Bradfield died while serving life in prison for the crimes. Smith (who was sentenced to death) had his conviction overturned because the prosecution had exculpatory evidence they’d unethically concealed from his defense (who claimed Bradfield had deliberately framed him). Smith died in 2009.

What of Stephanie and Edward? Well, the last confirmed sighting of them was on the aforementioned date of February 25, 1978, but there were several reported sightings of them after that, by Smith — not a credible witness perhaps — and by Stephanie’s younger sister, a neighbor, and others.

Now, Smith claimed the Hunsbergers went on the run because they owed money to drug dealers. But they left all their stuff behind at his house, including an uncashed tax return, and all those drugs which he claimed were theirs. Smith’s relationship with his daughter was understandably troubled, and he was demonstrably violent. Even if you don’t buy the story that he was a murderer, he was definitely a robber who, at the time of his arrest, was carrying multiple loaded guns and a syringe of “sedative drugs” (Placidyl?). The police consider him a suspect in Stephanie and Edward’s cases.

They definitely dropped out out sight sometime in 1978 or 1979; there were no sightings of them after that, and no one heard from them. Given the high-risk lifestyle they lead, and the lack of contact for nearly 40 years, I highly doubt they’re alive now. But who got them? Jay Smith? Drug dealers? Or just drugs? Or something else? Are their bodies perhaps listed as John Does somewhere else in the country, or do they lie undiscovered in a landfill or a shallow grave in Pennsylvania?

Let’s talk about it.

Make-a-List Monday: Teachers

This list is of MPs who were schoolteachers or college professors. I decided to include retired teachers, substitute teachers and student teachers, but not people who were just education majors in college, and not ones who had quit their education jobs to pursue other careers.

My dad is a professor of biology at Ohio State. Michael’s dad is a teacher; he taught high school Spanish and history, and since his retirement he’s taught Spanish at a local college off and on. Michael has held teaching jobs too; right now he’s a full-time tutor. One of my nephews is also a teacher, high school science I think.

Education is essential in any society and a good teacher can make an enormous difference in the life of a young person, but teaching is a very difficult job, and in the U.S. — not sure about other countries — teachers are underpaid and underappreciated.

  1. Carolyn Denise Brown
  2. Sharon Eugenia Davis
  3. Thomas Lee Duesterhaus
  4. Dorothy Geneva Freeman
  5. Jesus Maria Galindez
  6. Stephanie Marie Gant-Brady
  7. Tara Faye Grinstead
  8. Alice Kristina Wehr Hummel
  9. Elizabeth Ann Kenyon
  10. Sandra Lynn Kerby
  11. Alyos Jakob Krost
  12. Vicky L. Lynn
  13. Shelley Mook
  14. Oliver Wendell Munson
  15. Jennie M. Rehbinder
  16. Paige Marie Renkoski
  17. Randy R. Sitter
  18. Charles Southern Jr.
  19. Katherine Lynn Stobaugh
  20. Deborah Jean Swanson
  21. Leonard Taku
  22. Jane Ellen Wakefield
  23. John E. Warren