Some more little updates

The Virginia State Police has put up a TON of MP cases I haven’t seen/heard of before. I added seven today and I’m nowhere near done. Except the next few updates to be Virginia-dominated. For some existing cases, I got extra photos from the VSP. Oh, and the NCMEC has sent a few APs as well. The lists:

NEW PHOTOS

  1. Dwayne Allen Chick
  2. Crist Nelson Dauberman Sr.
  3. Christopher Ray Douthat
  4. Thomas Lee Duesterhaus
  5. Shawn Darnell Givens
  6. Rachel Nicole Good
  7. William Christopher Hensley Sr.
  8. Harold Ray Jones Jr.

AP PHOTOS

  1. Keiosha Marie Felix
  2. Christian Miguel Sanchez
  3. Veronica Nichole Sanchez
  4. Domingo Sanchez Gonzalez
  5. Esmit Sanchez Gonzalez
  6. Esther Valdez

Flashback Friday: Tyler Inman

I decided to cover Tyler Jennings Inman for Flashback Friday because the other day a page called Finding Tyler “liked” the Charley Project on Facebook. Three-year-old Tyler apparently wandered out of his family’s Aberdeen, Washington home one night in December 1982, during a bad thunderstorm.

According to articles on the Finding Tyler page, the police seemed to focus on the theory that he fell in the river and drowned. If he did, though, his body was never found, and Tyler is today listed as a non-family abduction with the NCMEC.

If Tyler is still alive, he’d be 37 today.

Flashback Friday: Cynthia Gooding and Teresa Alfonso

This week’s Flashback Friday case — like my MP of the week for this week — actually multiple cases: Cynthia Robin “Cindy” Gooding, age sixteen, and her twelve-year-old friend, Teresa Armanda “Terry” Alfonso. The pair disappeared from Marathon, a small town in the Florida Keys, on August 20, 1974 — exactly 41 years, 11 months and 8 days ago.

Teresa and Cindy were dropped off at a movie theater and planned to hitchhike to a party. I’m not sure whether their parents knew about the party or whether they were allowed to go. The girls may have said they were going to see a movie when they really planned to go to the party.

I’m not sure of much of anything in this case; there is very little information available. In 2007 an article about Florida Keys missing persons and UIDs talked about Teresa a little bit and had a quote from her mom, but the article didn’t have any info I could use and, worse, didn’t even mention Cindy at all. That seems like lazy and irresponsible journalism to me; even if they  couldn’t find any of Cindy’s relatives to interview, they should have at least said Teresa disappeared with another girl.

(I did, however, find a 2010 article from the Key West Citizen. I had to buy it on Newslibrary. It talks only about Teresa, but does mention she disappeared with her friend Cynthia Gooding, and has some background info for Teresa and Cindy that I’ve added to her casefile.)

I wondered about the serial killers Gerard John Schaefer and Gerald Stano, both of which preyed on young girls and women in Florida in the 1970s, but Schaefer was imprisoned by 1974 and Stano’s stomping ground seems to have been central Florida, not nearly as far as south as the Keys. (I’m basing this on the back that Susan Basile and Gail Lorraine Joiner, both suspected Stano victims, disappeared from central Florida towns more than a five-hour drive north of Marathon.) This Instagram post (which doesn’t mention Teresa) suggests Cindy was a victim of the serial killer Donald “Pee Wee” Gaskins, but I have no idea where that source is getting the information from. As far as I know Gaskins only claimed victims in the Carolinas, but I don’t know much about him.

Those men certainly weren’t the only psychopaths running around the southern U.S. in the seventies, though. If I were to guess, I’d say probably the girls were hitchhiking and got picked up by the wrong person.

MP of the week: Sasha Davis

This week’s featured missing person (which I, erm, totally forgot to add yesterday) is Sasha Davis, but it’s actually  three people, not one: Sasha disappeared with her three-month-old daughter, Selah Davis, and an adult male companion, Jarib Bennett, who was not Selah’s father as far as I know.

The trio disappeared on February 15, 2008, from either the Bronx in New York City, or from Rochester, a city a good five and a half hours’ drive to the northwest. I put the Bronx because I usually list whichever city the MP was last in, but they were en route to Rochester  and their car turned up there, which is an indication — albeit not a conclusive indication — that they did arrive there.

There has been very little press attention on this case and I could find nothing at all for the past three years. The only new info my searches today turned up is that Selah’s middle name is Lee — I’ll add that. I wish I had more info and I wish some news outlet would cover the case: I mean, SOMETHING happened to these three, they can’t just have vanished into thin air. And it’s been eight and a half years.

I think foul play was probably involved and the two adults are no longer alive, although Selah might be. If she’s alive she would be nine years old in October.

Make-a-List Monday: Seizures

A list of MPs with who suffer from or may suffer from seizures. I include cases where people are taking medication and might get seizures as a withdrawal symptom if they stop abruptly.

Fun fact: many people on the autism spectrum, perhaps as many as one-third, also suffer from epilepsy. Which kind of makes sense, since both autism and epilepsy are neurological disorders. I don’t have epilepsy, but when I was sixteen I did have a grand mal seizure for no reason whatsoever. I was standing there talking to my dad, holding a pop, and then I remember seeing black and white spirals, and suddenly I was sitting on the couch and had somehow managed to spill pop all over my butt. (You know, the butt I was sitting on. I’m still not sure how that happened.) Dad said I started twitching and stuff and jerked my arms out in front of me like a zombie. I remember I had a splitting headache for the rest of the day.

  1. Robert Albert Ahtonen
  2. Tonia Gay Aldrich
  3. Joann Angel
  4. Keith Edward Bamford
  5. Troy Donovan Burnett
  6. Randall William Collins
  7. Carla Rebecca Corley
  8. Jan Andre Cotta
  9. Chris Andrew Cunningham
  10. Hope Renee Curry
  11. Charles Daniels
  12. William Francis DiSilvestro IV
  13. Gary Dale Finck
  14. Jennie Lee Fisher
  15. Carol Jean Freeburg
  16. Noemi Gonzalez
  17. Donald Ray Goodman
  18. Jeremy Wayne Goodwin
  19. Ember Skye Graham
  20. Kenneth Warren Hager
  21. Ruvil Hale
  22. Jamie E. Harper
  23. Samuel Lee Hernandez
  24. Jesse Albertine Hoover
  25. Garrett Thomas Hughes
  26. Mark Inhoffe
  27. John Christopher Inman
  28. Refugio Isaguirre
  29. Nancy Lynn Jason
  30. Eulace King
  31. Michael S. King
  32. Peter Sean Kosky
  33. Wallace John Landry
  34. Robert Charles Livers Jr.
  35. Cheresa R. Lordi
  36. Shelley Diane Luty
  37. Tomas Santos Magdaleno
  38. Courtney Marcher
  39. Robert Wayne McCullar
  40. Cynthia Renea Milstead
  41. Steven Martin Moline Jr.
  42. Amy Sue Pagnac
  43. Timothy Scott Parry
  44. Steven Daniel Paul
  45. Angelo Gene Puglisi
  46. Blake Wade Pursley
  47. Rudolph David Rangel
  48. Gregory Wilson Reynolds
  49. Richard Allen Rhyne
  50. Gerald Rihlmann
  51. Tammy Dawn Risenhoover
  52. Robert J. Rithaler Jr.
  53. Tristan Markey Rivera
  54. Travis Dewayne Roberson
  55. Jackie Robinson
  56. William Robert Rochelle
  57. Reynaldo Rodriguez
  58. Laurel Lea Rogers
  59. Dudley Truett Scott
  60. Silas Sessions Jr.
  61. Reginald Jermaine Short
  62. Walter F. Smith Jr.
  63. Natasha Marie Shanes
  64. Terry Allen Shepherd
  65. Danielle Marie Sleeper
  66. Roland Jack Spencer III
  67. Jerry Tang
  68. Autumn Marie Traub
  69. Daffany Sherika Tullos
  70. Joseph D. Vanderhouwen
  71. David Clayton Warner
  72. Joseph Weber IV
  73. Ronald Eugene Westwick
  74. David Edward Williams
  75. Larry Williams

Select It Sunday: Isabella Miller-Jenkins

This week’s Select It Sunday case was chosen by Maddie C (she emailed, coincidentally, a few days before I received my most recent loony email): Isabella Ruth Miller-Jenkins, a seven-year-old who was abducted by her mother, Lisa Ann Miller, from Bedford, Virginia back in 2010. Lisa took her south; I think they were last known to be in Nicaragua. Isabella would now be fourteen.

This is a very high-profile family abduction case, mostly because Isabella’s parents are both women and Lisa is an ex-gay, right-wing Christian whose cause other right-wing Christian people have embraced — to the extent that several of them faced charges for helping her.

Lisa and Isabella’s other mother, Janet Jenkins, had split up amicably and Isabella lived with Lisa and had visitation Janet, but after Lisa joined Jerry Falwell‘s church, she decided homosexuality was sinful and wouldn’t let Isabella see Janet anymore because she didn’t want to expose her to that way of life. Several years of legal wrangling later, a family court judge transferred custody to Janet because he thought this was the only way Isabella could maintain a relationship with both mothers. In response, Lisa took her.

I am very much an LGBT ally, but even if I wasn’t, this case is really no different than any other family abduction case. You’ve got one parent who refused to let their ex see the child, alienated the child against her ex, made false accusations of abuse by the ex, and decided she was above the law and didn’t have to obey court rulings. This started long before the abduction, when the judge tried to enforce the visitation schedule by fining Lisa $25 for every day she wouldn’t allow Isabella to see Janet. Lisa racked up thousands in fines.

And to top it off, when they left Virginia, Lisa left Isabella’s pet hamsters behind at home to die a slow, horrible death of dehydration and thirst. Because, you see, if she asked anyone to look after them, that might tip the authorities off that they were going on the run. So she’s an animal abuser as well as a child abuser. Parental abduction is demonstrably child abuse, and Lisa is using religion as a shield for her crimes.

Not cool, Lisa. Not cool at all.

And now Isabella is probably living in pretty miserable conditions. El Salvador, one country where she and Lisa might be living, is an incredibly violent place and is considered the murder capital of the world. Although Nicaragua is safer by comparison, that’s not saying much, and Nicaragua is the poorest country in the western hemisphere, after Haiti. If Isabella is like most victims of family abduction — even those who aren’t living in third world countries — she is not receiving adequate education or health care. And of course she’s been completely cut off from the other side of her family, who love her. Lisa has, so far, stolen six and a half years of her life.

This is all pretty standard, alas, for family abductions. I cannot begin to explain how much parental kidnappers, and those that support them, disgust me.