Make-a-List Monday: Bus Stops

This week’s MALM is of MPs who were last seen at the bus stop or bus station. It seems to me that people, especially women and children, are kind of vulnerable at bus stops. They’re often standing close to the curb, within grabbing distance of passing motorists. People who are waiting for the bus are often tired, distracted, perhaps hungry, perhaps with their hands full of shopping or whatever, and just generally not at their best. Maybe the weather is terrible; maybe it’s raining or snowing or blisteringly cold, or maybe it’s humid and 95 degrees in the shade. And anyone who’s waiting for a bus obviously wants to go somewhere, and if someone pulls up and offers them a car ride to their destination — especially if it’s someone they know — the person might just say yes.

I did exclude people who were last seen walking towards or away from a bus stop. There are quite a few of those. But if a person was at the bus stop about to leave, or was about to board or even had already boarded, I put them on the list (provided, in the latter instance, that the bus hadn’t left yet).

  1. Ashok Ankam
  2. Paget Renee Barr
  3. Carol Ann Batterman
  4. Susan Robin Bender
  5. James Elwood Brady
  6. Allen Briscoe Jr.
  7. Larhonda Marie Bronson
  8. Jose Moreno Caballero
  9. Fernando Paul Cardenas
  10. Kevin Andrew McCarthy Collins
  11. Ingrid Siomara Contreras
  12. Thwana Mithsell Darrough
  13. Kimberly Sue Doss
  14. Jeremiah Edward Foco*
  15. Mary Frances Gregory
  16. Gwendolyn M. Hooser
  17. Sandra Lee Hopler
  18. Rita Mae Hughes
  19. Barbara Ann Hutchinson
  20. Rochelle Maria Ihm
  21. Willie Mae Jackson
  22. Matthew Ellis Keith
  23. Joseph A. Krainak Jr.
  24. Alexandria Joy Lowitzer
  25. Faloma Luhk
  26. Maleina Quitugua Luhk
  27. Suzanne Gloria Lyall
  28. Heather Ann MacCrossen
  29. Kimberly Ann Mallard
  30. Pedro Castro Martinez
  31. Marta Alicia Michel
  32. Jackson Alexander Miller
  33. Alan Lee Morse
  34. Judith Erin O’Donnell
  35. Ariza Maria Olivares
  36. Carmen Maria Owens
  37. Byron Eric Page
  38. Francisco Robles Perez
  39. Annette Deanne Sagers
  40. Philistin Saintcyr
  41. Lloyd Melvin Thomas
  42. Kimberly Faye Thrower
  43. Delight Marie Watson
  44. John Albert Weichelt
  45. Billy Wellman
  46. Francis Loretta Heath Wells
  47. Nancy Debra Willis

*maybe

Let’s talk about it: Ashok Narain

NamUs gives the year 1987 for when Ashok Kumar Narain disappeared from Eugene, Oregon. Other sources say it was in April 1988. Regardless, Ashok’s disappearance is a very mysterious case — was he a murderer, a victim, or both?

The story begins in 1983 when Ashok, a native of Fiji, married Raj, a fellow Fijian from his village. It was an arranged ceremony. The couple moved to Oregon and subsequently had a little girl, Kamnee Koushal Narain.

The Narains regularly wrote letters to their families back in Fiji. Nobody back home detected anything amiss from the letters; it looked like a normal marriage and Raj seemed happy enough. The letters eventually stopped, but the couple’s Fijian relatives weren’t worried.

In the meantime, in September 1987, the dismembered remains of a pregnant woman were found in two different rivers in Washington and Oregon. A few days later, a toddler’s body was found in yet a third river in the vicinity. Although the police suspected the woman and child were related, they couldn’t prove it, and there were no missing persons that matched either of them.

Ashok’s brother reported the Narains missing in 2006. He’d heard about the dead woman and baby in Washington, and Raj’s family couldn’t find any trace of her online. In 2007, DNA testing confirmed the bodies were Raj and Kamnee. Mother and daughter were taken back Fiji for burial. Raj was 24 years old at the time of her death; Kamnee was only fourteen months.

I haven’t seen anything about a cause of death. It’s possible the police don’t know due to the condition of the remains. It’s equally possible that police do know and are withholding this information from the public.

So… where’s Ashok, the last surviving member in the family? Nobody knows.

When a woman, particularly a pregnant woman, is murdered, the police always start their investigation by looking at the husband or boyfriend. Yet, there’s no warrant for Ashok’s arrest and he isn’t even being called suspect; he’s only wanted for questioning as a witness. He certainly seems to have dropped off the map entirely since his wife and daughter’s killings — although I must admit, he had a really good head start.

Yet the dates here are pretty significant, because if the 1988 date is correct, that means Ashok was last seen over six months AFTER Kamnee and Raj’s killings. And that’s kind of hard to explain away.

I have no idea whether or not Ashok committed the murders. I do, however, think whoever did it was someone close to the victims. I believe this because the killer(s) went to a great deal of trouble disposing of the bodies and concealing their identities. I mean: dismemberment, hiding Raj’s head where it would never be found, and dumping the pieces in three different rivers in two different states. I think if the person was a stranger or only a slight acquaintance, they wouldn’t bother with all that.

R.I.P. Raj, and the baby you were carrying. R.I.P. Kamnee. I hope they find out who committed such a terrible crime.

And… let’s talk about it.

Make-a-List Monday: Minors in unusual living situations

I thought I’d make a list today of kids under 18 who were had atypical housing arrangements. I don’t mean kids residing with stepparents, adoptive parents, foster care, boarding schools, group homes or residential treatment centers. Nor do I include cases where the child was left with a non-relative in what was meant to be a temporary arrangement.

I mean minors living with their friends, those living with adult friends of their families, those living with a spouse or boyfriend or girlfriend, those living alone, and those living with members of their extended family, provided the extended family were not officially foster parents or adoptive parents.

I know a guy who lived in a situation like that for a few years. I figured I’d talk about him here. I’m using alias names for everyone, and also placing the story in a different state, for privacy. This story is going to last for several paragraphs so skip to the list if you don’t care. This is what he told me:

START OF STORY: Basically, my friend Alec grew up in a tiny sneeze-and-you-miss it farm community in Illinois. Alec was the oldest of three siblings, and his mother abandoned the family when he was like six years old and dropped completely out of sight. There was a divorce but they couldn’t force her to pay child support because they couldn’t find her.

Alec’s father, Craig, was an alcoholic. The only jobs he could get were low-paying manual labor — construction, farm work, that sort of stuff. There was basically no chance of him improving his career prospects because he was more or less illiterate. Craig could write his name, and he could slowly sound out words if he had to, but his comprehension was just about nil. I don’t know if he had dyslexia or an intellectual disability or whether he simply wasn’t properly educated, but it’s hard to find any kind of decent job if you can’t read.

Craig was also an unreliable employee because of his constant drinking. At home, when drunk, he would verbally abuse his children. I asked Alec once if his father ever beat him and he said no, but he did say Craig “smacked him around” sometimes. When Craig wasn’t working, the family subsisted on food stamps and welfare (this was back before the big welfare overhaul in the mid-nineties) and on whatever Alec could bring in from his own part-time jobs.

One day, when he was 16 or so, Alec just fed up with it and left, with no belongings, and only the clothes on his back. He went across town to his best friend from high school, Trevor Martin. By rural Illinois standards, Trevor’s family was rich. Mom was a professional counselor. Dad was an anesthesiologist, which is one of the highest-paying medical specialties. Alec basically showed up on Trevor’s doorstep and asked the Martins he could stay there for two years until he graduated high school.

And they let him. I wouldn’t say the Martins treated Alec like their own son, but they provided for his material needs and they were nice to him and didn’t use them as their verbal or physical punching bag. Alec remains in close touch with the Martin family to this day.

After Alec graduated high school, the Martins’ generosity did not extend towards paying for his college education. I’m not even sure he wanted to go to college anyway, and his GPA wasn’t that great. He opted to join the military. After his discharge he got a high-paying job using the training the military gave him, and he’s doing well for himself.

Technically I suppose this was a runaway situation, but Craig knew exactly where Alec was the entire time, and never reported him missing to the police. Alec continued to attend the same high school, and the teachers knew he was actually living with the Martins, and nobody reported it. I mean, let’s face it, he was in a much better living situation than CPS could have provided him. END OF STORY

Now on to the list!

  1. Anthony Ross Allen
  2. Andria Ann Bailey
  3. Erica Monique Bradley
  4. Kristina Delane Branum
  5. Zackery Lee Brewer
  6. Niki Diane Britten
  7. Monica Cassandra Carrasco
  8. Amber Elizabeth Cates
  9. Christopher Gage Daniel
  10. Tracy Lynn Davenport
  11. Timothy Jacob Davison
  12. Theresa M. Fishbach
  13. Elizabeth Franks
  14. Angela Lee Freeman
  15. Debra Lee Frost
  16. Richard Gorham
  17. Coral Pearl Hall
  18. Tinze Lucinda Huels
  19. Jennifer Jane Hughes
  20. Karen Beth Kamsch
  21. Mary Sue Kitts
  22. Ruth Ann Leamon
  23. Kase Ann Lee
  24. Chloie Rhianna Leverette
  25. Alexandra Cassandra Livingston
  26. Kristopher Charles Loesch
  27. Faloma Luhk
  28. Maleina Quitugua Luhk
  29. Brianna Alexandria Maitland
  30. Tianna Neshelle Martin
  31. Ila Veronica Tucker Maynard
  32. Heather Lorraine Mehlhoff
  33. Launa Renee Merritt
  34. Garnell Monroe Moore
  35. Sophia Felecita Moreno
  36. Tristen Alan Myers
  37. Ariza Maria Olivares
  38. Victoria Jane Owczynsky
  39. Alicia Guzman Padilla
  40. Jose Francisco Fuentes Pereira
  41. Larry Wayne Perry
  42. Eric Wayne Pyles
  43. Christina Marchell Richart
  44. Joseph Rodriguez
  45. Kathleen Edna Rodgers
  46. Qua’Mere Sincere Rogers
  47. Cristina Ester Ruiz-Rodriguez
  48. Alisha Smiley
  49. Roland Jack Spencer III
  50. Rocio Chila Sperry
  51. Edward Ashton Stubbs
  52. Kylan Patrick Stubler
  53. Patricia Lynn Taylor
  54. Mary Rachel Trlica
  55. Daffany Sherika Tullos
  56. Jahi Marques Turner
  57. Leah Jean Van Schoick
  58. Mary Ann Verdecchia
  59. Brittany Renee Williams
  60. April Susanne Wiss
  61. Quinn Renard Woodfolk
  62. Shelby Raistlin Wright

 

An honorable mention: Marble Ace Arvidson. Although his residence was officially a foster home, his “foster father” was in his twenties — that is, only a few years older than Marble — and many accounts refer to the other residents in the home as “roommates.”

It’s pretty hard to put a list like this together. I may very well have missed a few, or more than a few. My apologies.

Holy wow, what happened here?

I was looking at Charley’s visitor stats and noticed that last month my average was nearly 19,000 independent visits a day. My usual average is 9-10,000 visits a day. When I looked at the page for April at first I thought there was a mistake, because most of the days seemed to hover around 10,000, sometimes more, sometimes less.

Then I saw April 21 and 22. 30,509 visits for April 21. And a whopping 198,839 visits for April 22.

Whaaaat?

The number of visits for the days after that are elevated, but not hugely so — around 15,000. And surprisingly, the most-visited casefile is not Peter Kema‘s, but Tammy Leppert‘s.

Did something big happen in Tammy’s case that I’m missing? The only thing I can find is that Tammy was the subject of this Reddit thread.

More on the Peter Kema indictments

As you all probably know, Peter Kema Jr‘s parents, Peter Kema Sr. and Jaylin Kema, have been charged with his murder. Well, I have just read comments Peter Boy’s siblings made to the media about the indictments, and it’s pretty heartbreaking.

Peter Boy’s younger sister is referred to as “Devalynn” in his Charley Project casefile; she later changed her name to Lina Acol. (She was sent to live with her maternal grandparents after Peter Boy’s disappearance, and was legally adopted by them.) She was only four years old when her brother disappeared but she remembers what happened. In the last few years she’s renewed her relationship with her mother, hoping Jaylin would tell her what really happened to Peter Boy. Lina even allowed Jaylin to spend time with her son. I can’t imagine how hard that must have been.

This is such an awful case. So many kids who are abused have literally no one who really cares about them. Peter wasn’t one of those kids. He had grandparents who cared about him and his siblings and would have taken them in if they could have.

I hope Jaylin flips on Peter Sr. and testifies against him. That seems like the best way to win this case.

Fox News article

This is the article I got quoted in: Parents indicted in cold case murder of Hawaiian boy by Malia Zimmerman.

“It was just absolutely horrifying the torture this child was subjected to,” said Meaghan Good, founder and editor of The Charley Project, a website that is tracking 9,500 unsolved murder cases including that of Peter Boy Jr. “I read all 2,000 pages about the case released by the Department of Human Services in 2005, and it very obvious what happened to Peter Boy Jr.”