Ruth Egnoski ponderings

Ruth Egnoski is one of those cases where I have VERY little info, and now it seems what little I had is being thrown into doubt. NamUs’s profile for her, recently added, says she disappeared sometime in the fall of 1964. I’ve got the date as sometime in 1966.

I had a look at Newspapers.com and what I find there hasn’t helped at all. The archived issues of the Janesville Daily Gazette have ten mentions of a Ruth Egnoski between 1955 and 1964. Janesville, Wisconsin is just twenty miles from Delavan, Wisconsin, the town Ruth disappeared from; it’s quite likely this is the same Ruth. (Unless it’s her mother.)

The newspaper’s August 21, 1964 issue has her name on the list of hospital admittances and calls her “Mrs. Ruth Egnoski.” Ruth would have been sixteen at the time, but in the 1960s it was common for girls that age to be married. Per the newspaper, on August 28, Ruth was released from the hospital. This is the last time she was mentioned in that newspaper. At least, it’s the last time she was mentioned in Newspapers.com’s archived issues of that newspaper, which isn’t exactly the same thing, yeah?

I know the people who write NamUs profiles utilize the same resources I do, and I have to wonder if the Newspapers.com mentions are the reason they list Ruth’s date of disappearance as sometime in the autumn of 1964. Yet this 2002 article gives the date of disappearance as 1966, and that’s what I had until now.

It’s possible nobody really remembers when she disappeared. It didn’t really attract any notice at the time — it was reported but the police didn’t investigate. Records get lost. People die. Memories fade.

I’ll update her casefile to reflect the uncertainty regarding the year. And I’ll add her middle name — Muriel. That’s all I was able to get from NamUs.

Flashback Friday: Diane Dye

This week’s FF case is Diane Genice Dye, a thirteen-year-old girl who ran away from her San Jose, California home on July 30, 1979. One of her friends, it is said, saw her in a shopping mall fifty miles away in December 1981, a year and a half after her initial disappearance. Diane spoke to her friend and said she didn’t want to go home and didn’t want anyone to know where she was. This was the last sign of her.

There’s a good chance Diane is still alive and still, perhaps, doesn’t want anyone to know where she is. Perhaps she doesn’t even know she’s still listed as missing. She would be 51 years old now.

Carlene Tengelsen’s mom dies

I’ve been informed of this article that went out yesterday: Carlene Sessions Tengelsen‘s mother died on December 21, at the age of 83. This is her obituary, which says Carlene preceded her in death, along with another daughter. Carlene still has two living siblings though.

I wish the NCMEC would make a poster for her. I wish we could find out what happened. It’s been almost 45 years, and Carlene would be sixty years old in the unlikely event that she’s still alive.

Missing persons news

I’ll cover the recovery of the Yates girls in their own entry, but here’s some other missing persons news:

  • This accountant’s hobby? Identifying missing people through his drawings
    My friend and Irregular Carl Koppelman has been featured in the Orange County Register. He does wonderful sketches of UIDs and was instrumental in identifying Cali Doe as Tammy Alexander. Congratulations, Carl!
  • Trial date in 20-year-old cold case pushed back to October
    A year and a quarter ago ago, more or less, Kirsten Renee Hatfield‘s two-doors-down neighbor was charged with her murder. The headline of this article is pretty self-explanatory, and the news story explains why: the suspect has new lawyers now who need time to review the evidence.
    Kirsten’s case, for whatever reason, fascinated me back when I was a child and first started getting interested in missing persons. I had a website when I was twelve or so, with some poems and stories I wrote, and one of them was a poem called “Missing, Presumed Dead” and it was based on Kirsten’s disappearance, as I explained on the site. Kirsten’s mom found it and emailed me, saying she was touched that a little girl in Ohio was thinking of her and her lost daughter, but she didn’t believe Kirsten was dead.
  • Judge orders suspect in cold case homicide to trial in district court
    Apparently the motive for Cari Lea Farver‘s homicide was a love triangle; both she and the suspect, Shanna Goylar, were seeing the same man. According to prosecutors, after Goylar killed Cari, she burned the body and then went on Cari’s social media accounts and tried to make it look like she was still alive.
  • Missing Oklahoma woman found more than 20 years after disappearance
    This case isn’t one of mine. It’s a really awesome story, though, how hard Shelly Jennings’s daughters looked for her, and how she was found largely through their efforts. Twenty-three years after she walked away from her family in Oklahoma, she turns up at a bus station in Modesto, California. I hope they can reconcile, although given Shelly’s mental illness, this may not be possible.
  • For families of missing persons, not knowing is excruciating
    This is about the disappearance of Cody Henry Turner, who went missing from Washington in 2015.
  • Missing Minnesotans: Susan Swedell
    Obviously, an article about Susan Anne Swedell (for whom I recently posted an updated AP).

Make-a-List Monday: Older children where a parent is suspected

This list is for kids over the age of ten where one or both of the child’s parents (or step-parents, or guardians) is a suspect or possible suspect in their disappearance, or the circumstances indicate they could be involved. I’m not talking about family abduction cases, I mean cases where they think the parent killed the child. I’m including murder-without-a-body cases.

Child abuse and neglect occurs at all ages, of course, but it’s my understanding that child abuse deaths in older kids are relatively rare. I don’t know much about this sort of thing but my guess would be it’s because older kids are both less fragile and more capable of defending themselves than infants and toddlers.

I’m grouping these kids in alphabetical order by age, and the suspect is in parentheses. In a lot of these cases, other family members — siblings or a parent — are also missing.

  1. Sheketah Michele Brown, 10 (father)
  2. Shakeima Ann Cabbagestalk, 10 (stepfather)
  3. Kristopher Charles Loesch, 10 (mother and mother’s girlfriend)
  4. Reagan Cordell Uden, 10 (stepfather)
  5. Karen Zhou, 10 (stepfather)
  6. Haleigh Breann Culwell, 11 (stepfather)
  7. Richard Lee Haynes Jr., 11 (father and stepmother)
  8. Adam Joseph Herrman, 11 or 12 (adoptive parents)
  9. Barry James Kephart II, 11 (father)
  10. Billy Sena, 11 (mother’s live-in boyfriend)
  11. Richard Loren Uden, 11 (stepfather)
  12. Terry Lee Westerfield, 11 (stepfather)
  13. Debra Jean Cole, 12 (mother’s live-in boyfriend)
  14. Crystal Gayle Dittmeyer, 12 (stepfather)
  15. Ivy Matory, 12 (stepfather)
  16. Jaliek L. Rainwalker, 12 (adoptive father)
  17. Doreen Jane Vincent, 12 (father)
  18. Melinda Karen Creech, 13 (mother)
  19. Kelly Jean Harris, 13 (stepfather)
  20. Rachel Marie Mellon, 13 (stepfather)
  21. Rachanda Lea Pickle, 13 (stepfather)
  22. Ricky Lane Thomas Jr., 13 (stepfather)
  23. Aundria Michelle Bowman, 14 (adoptive father)
  24. Toni Lynn McNatt-Chiappetta, 14 (father)
  25. Christina Marchell Richart, 14 (foster mother; her biological uncle’s wife)
  26. Monique Christine Daniels, 15 (stepfather)
  27. Tammy Sue Rothganger, 15 (stepfather)
  28. Jason Sims Jr., 15 (parents)
  29. Bethany Anne Sinclair, 15 (mother’s live-in boyfriend)
  30. Joyce Irene Cogburn, 15 (male temporary guardian)
  31. William Dale Gunn, 15 (stepfather)
  32. Josephine Yvette Cogburn, 16 (male temporary guardian)
  33. Margarette Ann Cuauhtli, 16 (adoptive father)
  34. Mindi Chambers, 17 (father)
  35. Alissa Marie Turney, 17 (stepfather; legally adopted her)

Honorable mention: Richard Gorham, 11. His mother’s live-in boyfriend is a suspect in his disappearance. However, Richard was living with his grandfather, Roland Himebrook, when he went missing. Himebrook disappeared too.

Hrmm…

I’ve been up all night doing this and that and have been combing over the under-eighteens on NamUs that have no photos, looking to see if I can find some photos. I found one for Tebble Anita Garrett, but it’s several years out of date; I found an archived article on Newspapers.com from when she ran away in 1985. She got found two and a half weeks later.

More interestingly, I found a 2001 obituary for a Mildred Armstrong of Greenville, South Carolina — Tebble disappeared from Pickens — that mentions one of her survivors as “a daughter, Tebble Garrett, who disappeared in 1991.”

NamUs says Tebble disappeared in 1988. I wonder if perhaps her family heard from her or saw her at some point in 1991? Or did they merely report her missing in 1991, when in fact she dropped out of sight years earlier?

She definitely disappeared more than once, and the NamUs profile indicates Tebble had some serious difficulties by 1988: she was seventeen, pregnant, had needle marks on her arms and four street names. By that point I wouldn’t be at all surprised in her family quite wasn’t sure when they’d seen her last, poor girl.