Sweeeeeet….

I have stumbled across a new collection of MP cases, put together by the National Park Service. This list is by no means exhaustive, I’m sure, but it’s a start, and I see several names I don’t recognize, as well as nuggets of information I didn’t have for cases already on Charley.

For example, it turns out that Trenny Lynn Gibson‘s real name is Teresa. Who knew? Even the NCMEC lists her as Trenny.

Anyway: woo! I hope they keep it current.

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Make-a-List Monday: “May be in the company of an adult male”

A lot of teenage girls who run away have run away to be with an older boyfriend. In those cases the NCMEC poster (and therefore the Charley Project) casefile usually has the note that the MP “may be in the company of an adult male.” There’s rarely any details about the companion, beyond the “adult male” designation.

Speaking of such things, a few details about pedophilia and statutory rape in the United States.

  1. These girls’ boyfriends are almost certainly NOT pedophiles as defined by the DSM-V, or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Pedophiles, by definition, must be attracted to pre-pubescent children, and there must be at least a five-year difference between the pedophile and the child. The runaways I’m talking about are in their teens, and in any case, many of the adult males we’re talking about are in their teens themselves — eighteen or nineteen — or early twenties. It’s a big pet peeve of mine when people use the word “pedophile” to apply to all sexual offenders. Call them predators, perverts, whatever, but “pedophile” is not the correct term.
  2. The age of consent varies by state. I think it’s generally between 16 and 18. In some states there are exceptions to the law for cases where the person under the age of consent is close in age to their partner — i.e. a fifteen-year-old and a seventeen- or eighteen-year-old, in a state where the age of consent is sixteen. And in some cases it can make a difference if the older person in the relationship is in a position of power over the younger one — for example, depending on the state, a high school teacher can be charged with a sex offense if they’re having sex with a student who’s over the age of consent, or even over the age of 18. Also, if an underage person gets married — and in some states you can marry at as young as twelve years old, if you get permission from a parent and/or family court judge — it’s legal for them to have sex with their spouse no matter what age they are.

Anyway, here’s my current list of female runaways who “may be in the company of an adult male.”

  1. Emily Bracamontes
  2. Lisamarie Canchola
  3. Nachida Keota Chandara
  4. Danica Dianne Childs
  5. Kimberlyn Rosa Cubias
  6. Keiosha Marie Felix
  7. Robyn Leslie Hatcher
  8. Janteyl Danielle Johnson
  9. Heyvi Marbely Lainez-Pinot
  10. Bessy Edilia Mazariegos Pereira
  11. Eliud Maluyn Ochoa
  12. Karla Yulisa Portillo-Amaya
  13. Mariela Roblero Bravo and her baby son, Wisley Tojil
  14. Maria Ines Salazar
  15. Elsa Janell “Lilly” Wind

Select It Sunday: Cayce Lynn McDaniel

Bridget B. asked me to profile Cayce Lynn McDaniel‘s case for Select It Sunday; the 21st anniversary of her disappearance was last month. She was fourteen when she disappeared from Milan, Tennessee on August 16, 1996. She attended a church party and then someone dropped her off at home, which was unoccupied at the time. Cayce’s mom arrived home in the early hours of the next morning and found her daughter gone. She had had time to change clothes, grab some milk and cookies and turn on the TV before she disappeared.

I did a search and found this 2017 article about the case, but it doesn’t say anything new. A 2010 article says the police believe Cayce is dead.

Thinking aloud in today’s updates

  1. This may be setting some kind of record in how many murder-without-a-body cases were included in a single day’s update: there are seven here (or five if you want to get picky). I’ve got John Charles Cizek, Marcia Ann Forsberg, Hoggle siblings Jacob and Sarah, Donna Mae Jokumsen, and Lyon sisters Katherine and Sheila.
  2. The info I added to Marcia Forsberg’s page came from one of those “keep in touch with your high school class” type sites. In her profile on the page, Marcia talks about how happy she is in her marriage to her husband, described as her “soul mate and best friend” and “the love of my life.” Little knowing that the love of her life would, by his own admission, kill and dismember her a couple of years later. That’s hella depressing to read.
  3. Why is the NCMEC using Photograph 1 of Cynthia Bravo on their poster for her when Photograph 2 (via CDOJ) is so much better quality?
  4. I wonder if it’s significant that Cynthia disappeared just before her birthday. In Hispanic communities there’s something called the quinceanera or the fiesta de quince años, where there’s a massive party on a girl’s fifteenth birthday and she dresses up in a fancy formal dress, something like a prom dress or a wedding dress; it’s a rite of passage celebrating the girl’s transition from childhood to womanhood. Cynthia is Hispanic and vanished just one day before she would have turned fifteen. Just a thought.
  5. Another question/thought about Cynthia: who the heck runs away with no shoes on?

Select It Sunday: Brittanee Drexel

Preston Winfrey, my new web guru, was given the honor of selecting my Sunday case this week, and he chose Brittanee Marie Drexel. Her case has been relatively high profile and bears similarities to Natalee Holloway’s: a beautiful high school student with everything going for her goes off to a resort town and is never seen again. She was seventeen and a junior when she disappeared from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina on April 25, 2009. She was from New York and had gone to Myrtle Beach (without parental permission) for spring break.

In 2016, investigators announced they thought they knew what happened to her. The theory is that she was abducted, held against her will and gang-raped for several days. Her abductors planned to sell her into prostitution, but because her disappearance received such widespread publicity, they decided to kill her instead.

This theory is short on evidence, though, and although suspects have been named in the alleged kidnapping, rape and murder, no one has been charged and Brittanee has never been found.

Yay, NCMEC added an old runaway case!

NamUs has the case of Tebble Anita Garrett, with a reasonable amount of detail — tattoo description, several aliases, was pregnant — but there was (and is, as of this writing) no photo on the casefile. In January I was able to get a photo of her from Newspapers.com and so I added her to Charley, but the photo was a few years out of date — Tebble, it seems, had been a chronic runaway, and the photo I had was from an article about one of her disappearances two or three years prior to 1988.

But yay, the NCMEC has just put up a poster for her! With another photo, presumably more recent!

(And the poster, I note, has a different listed date and place of Tebble’s disappearance than NamUs does. Sometimes NamUs gives the date a person was reported missing as the date of disappearance — they’re hardly the only source that does that either. Given Tebble’s status as a chronic runaway, it’s possible her family didn’t report her missing for six weeks because they expected her to return on her own. Or it’s possible they didn’t report her missing at first, then couldn’t quite remember when she was last seen. Or it’s possible she disappeared from Easley, South Carolina on September 7, then was sighted in Pickens, South Carolina on October 18. The cities are only seven to ten miles apart, after all.)

Anyway. I’m so happy they added her. Tebble’s been missing for almost thirty years now and I really LOVE IT when the NCMEC adds new-old cases. It makes my day, actually. Especially new-old cases I haven’t heard of before. Recently they did Henrietta Geck Cruz Avila, and I was able to get some additional info from the Newspapers.com archive (I LOVE THAT ARCHIVE, thanks for paying for the subscription, you-know-who-you-are) about her case. It reminds me a bit of Beverly Sharpman‘s.

Anyway. Thanks, NCMEC.