AP/picture dump

Got some new age-progressions and new pictures for you, also middle names:

Make-a-List Monday: Cross necklaces

A list of people who were wearing a cross necklace when they disappeared. This is quite a common jewelry item, for men as well as women, as you can see — perhaps the most common jewelry there is in the Christian world. Fun fact: although all crucifixes are cross necklaces, not all cross necklaces are crucifixes. A crucifix has to have Jesus on the cross pendant. I know because I just looked it up.

  1. Peter Achermann
  2. Rosio Monica Beltran
  3. Nancy Leah Brannon*
  4. Alex James Buonassisi
  5. Michelle Lee Burchell
  6. Kimberly Shawn Cheatham
  7. Cody Robert Christle
  8. Matthew Jonathan Curtis*
  9. Peggy Ilene Humber
  10. Jesse Gabriel Florez
  11. Dean Leslie French
  12. Omar Jabree Gibson
  13. Scott Kevin Jared
  14. Janice Yvonne Johnson
  15. El Shawndrae Devon Jones
  16. Kathleen Kelly
  17. Robert Keck
  18. Yul Demetrius Kennedy
  19. Patricia Ann Krieger
  20. Ruth Ann Leamon
  21. Nieko Anthony Lisi
  22. Tommie Lee Lowery
  23. Larry Don Madden
  24. Tammy Mahoney
  25. Lubov Marchenko
  26. Carmen Magdalena Mares
  27. Wilbert Martin
  28. Ashley Nicole Martin Mauldin
  29. Gloria White Moore McDonald
  30. Shane Lawrence McKinney*
  31. Lori Ann Murchison-Dunbar
  32. Kenny Manuel Naidas Jr.
  33. Nguyet Minh Nguyen
  34. Georgia Darlene Nolan
  35. Michelle Loree Parker
  36. Bernadine Paul
  37. Kara Denora Rigdon
  38. William Larry Roland
  39. Michelle Lee Rust
  40. Jason Joseph Ryan*
  41. Jairo Javier Sanchez
  42. Lisa Ann Schmidt
  43. Miguel Sonny Scott
  44. Yvonne Renee Scott
  45. Bethany Anne Sinclair
  46. Sharon Rose Sons
  47. Walter Shannon Stevenson
  48. William Paul Smolinski Jr.
  49. Lisa Alaria Szasz-Lazzaro
  50. Angel Antonio Torres
  51. Vikki L.Vukelich
  52. Donald Beams Wallace
  53. Jacob Wallace
  54. Grongie Ward
  55. Rasheeyda Robinson Wilson
  56. Dawn Marie Young
  57. Violet Nancy Zarb

*maybe

Let’s talk about it: Francheska and Misheila Martinez

On June 9, 2000, Francheska Martinez disappeared from Paterson, New Jersey. She was twelve years old; it was the day before her thirteenth birthday. A few days later, the miniskirt and pink top Francheska had been wearing the day she disappeared were found inside a plastic supermarket bag in the driveway outside her mom’s house.

Francheska had a twin sister, Misheila. One month and twelve days after Francheska went missing, Misheila also disappeared. It’s been sixteen and a half years since then and nobody has heard from either of the girls.

Although the NCMEC classifies both sisters as runaways, the phrase “human trafficking” comes to mind. According to her friends, Francheska had a secret “boyfriend” who was 22 years old. I can well understand why he would want to keep such a relationship a secret because, pretty much by definition, there was something very wrong going on there. According to this legal website, if Francheska was having sex with that “boyfriend” he could have faced a very long prison term.

But even if human trafficking was involved here, it’s VERY unusual for these girls to have been gone as long as they have, without a word to anyone or any indication as to what became of them. What do you suppose happened? Let’s talk about it.

Flashback Friday: Loralee Lhotka

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Loralee Sue Lhotka — another one of those cases where I have precious little information and doubts about what I do have.

NamUs gives Loralee’s date of disappearance as January 1, 1975, but they also say she disappeared en route to a doctor’s appointment. Nobody makes medical appointments on New Year’s Day, although hospitals and perhaps a few urgent care clinics would be open. I think it’s more likely that the actual date of disappearance isn’t known and whoever entered the case into NamUs put down January 1 to encompass the entire year of 1975. I put in the Charley Project casefile that she disappeared on some unknown date that year. She would have been 19 or 20 at the time; she was born in June.

NamUs also gives Loralee’s race as “unsure.” The Washington State Missing Persons database entry for her lists her as white. She looks like she could have some Native American blood, but it’s very hard to judge by the photograph. For what it’s worth, the name Lhotka is of Czech origin. It is said that Loralee may use the last name Spamola, a VERY rare surname that’s almost unknown in the United States.

As for what caused her disappearance… I would have to guess foul play. Loralee may have decided to hitchhike to her doctor’s appointment and it’s possible she picked the wrong ride. Her wallet turned up in the Wenatchee National Forest in 1978. I wish I knew where exactly; the forest covers 2,700+ square miles over three counties.

Ruth Egnoski ponderings

Ruth Egnoski is one of those cases where I have VERY little info, and now it seems what little I had is being thrown into doubt. NamUs’s profile for her, recently added, says she disappeared sometime in the fall of 1964. I’ve got the date as sometime in 1966.

I had a look at Newspapers.com and what I find there hasn’t helped at all. The archived issues of the Janesville Daily Gazette have ten mentions of a Ruth Egnoski between 1955 and 1964. Janesville, Wisconsin is just twenty miles from Delavan, Wisconsin, the town Ruth disappeared from; it’s quite likely this is the same Ruth. (Unless it’s her mother.)

The newspaper’s August 21, 1964 issue has her name on the list of hospital admittances and calls her “Mrs. Ruth Egnoski.” Ruth would have been sixteen at the time, but in the 1960s it was common for girls that age to be married. Per the newspaper, on August 28, Ruth was released from the hospital. This is the last time she was mentioned in that newspaper. At least, it’s the last time she was mentioned in Newspapers.com’s archived issues of that newspaper, which isn’t exactly the same thing, yeah?

I know the people who write NamUs profiles utilize the same resources I do, and I have to wonder if the Newspapers.com mentions are the reason they list Ruth’s date of disappearance as sometime in the autumn of 1964. Yet this 2002 article gives the date of disappearance as 1966, and that’s what I had until now.

It’s possible nobody really remembers when she disappeared. It didn’t really attract any notice at the time — it was reported but the police didn’t investigate. Records get lost. People die. Memories fade.

I’ll update her casefile to reflect the uncertainty regarding the year. And I’ll add her middle name — Muriel. That’s all I was able to get from NamUs.

Flashback Friday: Diane Dye

This week’s FF case is Diane Genice Dye, a thirteen-year-old girl who ran away from her San Jose, California home on July 30, 1979. One of her friends, it is said, saw her in a shopping mall fifty miles away in December 1981, a year and a half after her initial disappearance. Diane spoke to her friend and said she didn’t want to go home and didn’t want anyone to know where she was. This was the last sign of her.

There’s a good chance Diane is still alive and still, perhaps, doesn’t want anyone to know where she is. Perhaps she doesn’t even know she’s still listed as missing. She would be 51 years old now.