MP of the week: Bruce Falconer

This week’s featured missing person is Bruce Falconer, a 21-year-old Marine who disappeared from Bismarck, North Dakota on February 20, 1981, after a night out with his friend Tim Jewell. Jewell disappeared also, but his body was found in 1992. I suppose by then there probably wasn’t much left, but the authorities ruled the cause of death as exposure and they think Bruce probably died of exposure too.

Their car got stuck in the mud along the Missouri River and I guess the two men left to get help, but got lost. Winter weather in North Dakota is no joke, and probably both of them had been drinking.

I do think it’s slightly odd that Jewell’s body was recovered and Falconer’s wasn’t. You’d think they’d be close together.

Yeah, so this is the first time I’ve been to my computer in a few days. I’ve got a horrible cold and have mostly been lying in bed and reading a bit and sleeping a lot.

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Flashback Friday: Gloria Korzon

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Gloria Suzanne Korzon, who disappeared from Warrington, Pennsylvania on March 9, 1981. The case is a very sad but pretty typical example of domestic violence.

Due to her husband William’s attempt to cover up her absence, she wasn’t reported missing until July of that year. When Gloria’s family reported her disappearance to the police and they asked William about it, he lied and said she was visiting an aunt out of state.

Furthermore, the couple’s marriage had been pretty terrible. The police had been called to their home eight times, and Gloria left behind a list of times when William allegedly assaulted her; the list was three pages long.

William is, obviously, the prime suspect in his wife’s disappearance, but no charges have ever been filed in her case.

Thinking aloud in today’s updates

Yeah, I went a bit nuts this night.

  • Regarding Angelica Gandara:
    It would appear from the neighbor’s account that someone was stalking Angelica prior to her abduction. I’m not sure what to make of the account by the witness in San Antonio, though.
    It’s certainly plausible but I don’t know if it was ever verified — I could find only one article about it. Nowadays it would be pretty easy to verify since I’m assuming all convenience stores have security cameras, but I don’t think that was the case in 1985.
    If that girl WAS Angelica, though, it would seem to indicate she was kept alive for an extended period after her disappearance, which makes me wonder if human trafficking was involved. Perhaps she might even still be alive today.
    The fact that the little girl didn’t ask for help doesn’t mean this witness’s account is discredited — Shasta Groene didn’t ask for help either, although she did keep walking up to people and staring at them in right the face.
  • Regarding Carol Woolsoncroft:
    I tried to find out what Eugene LaFaye is doing nowadays but came up with nothing I could verify. I couldn’t find anyone by that name listed in the sex offender registry. I couldn’t find him listed in the Florida Department of Corrections database.
    I did find mention of a Eugene LaFaye in the Fort Myers area in 1979 and I’m pretty sure this guy was Carol’s boyfriend’s father, since (a) the 1979 Eugene was 65 is and Carol’s Eugene would have been in 19 at the time and (b) I know Carol’s Eugene is a junior, so his father would have had the same name.
    I did find mention of an “incapacitated person” named Eugene LaFaye in the Fort Myers area in 2001. I’m not sure which Eugene this is. Eugene Sr. would have been 87 by then.
    At any rate this is a very sad but all-too-common kind of disappearance — domestic violence. It’s like super-obvious what happened, they just can’t prove it.
  • Also… I found photos of Ivan Gutierrez and Charles Gibson! They’re not even really awful photos, either! I mean, they’re not the greatest, but they’re about as good as you can expect from newspaper archives, and I could finally add the cases to Charley!
    Though why Gibson is in FDLE and Gutierrez isn’t, I don’t know; one of the articles said Gutierrez was officially reported missing by his father. Shrug.

MP of the week: Barry James Kephart II

This week’s featured missing person is Barry James “Bucky” Kephart II, an eleven-year-old boy who disappeared from Albuquerque, New Mexico on August 22, 1981. This is an exceptionally sad case, an all-but-confirmed child abuse homicide at the hands of his father, Barry Kephart Sr.

Unfortunately, charges can’t be filed in this case because at the time of Bucky’s disappearance, New Mexico had a fifteen-year statute of limitations on that type of crime. The statute of limitations no longer exists, but for Bucky it expired in 1996.

A stray thought

I was going over some old cases and NCMEC cases and stuff (and phoned in a tip to their hotline; I found a missing kid’s equally missing mother on Facebook) and noticed that on Amber Crum‘s casefile I’d written,

In 1986, investigators checked the fingerprints of a girl who was abandoned in California that same year. The girl matched Amber’s general physical description and was about the right age. Their fingerprints did not match, however.

I wonder, now, if that abandoned little girl was Denise Beaudin‘s child, Dawn/Lisa? Dawn was about the same age as Amber would have been, and she was abandoned in California in 1986.

I suppose I’ll probably never know. But it seems moderately likely.

Flashback Friday: Gary Wayne Dover

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Gary Wayne Dover, who disappeared from the city of Denton, Texas on August 29, 1981. Denton is up in the northern part of the state near the Oklahoma border.

I don’t have much on Gary Dover’s case. His car was found abandoned after his disappearance, which isn’t a great sign. I haven’t heard about any evidence of violence in the car, like blood or anything, but foul play is suspected in Dover’s disappearance.

A fairly unusual distinguishing characteristic: Dover has a bullet wound scar in his lower left leg, and the bullet was still inside him. He also suffers from an unspecified “eye disorder” but generally refused to wear his prescription glasses.

If he were alive today he could be 66.

Select It Sunday: Roger John Ellison

Selected by Michael W.: Roger Ellison, a seventeen-year-old senior who vanished from Cedaredge, Colorado on February 10, 1981. (I should have done this last Sunday. My apologies.)

Although many kids disappear en route to or from school, it seems very few of them actually disappear on the school campus itself. Roger did: he definitely made it to school that day, and was sighted putting stuff in his locker in the morning, but never attended class.

His case is classified as a non-family abduction and police believe he was killed shortly after he went missing. And there is someone the cops have in mind, a person of interest.