Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Song Joseph

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I’m profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP every day for the month of May. Today’s case (which was supposed to run last night but didn’t; I forgot to schedule it and it was stuck in drafts) is Song Im Joseph, a 20-year-old Korean-American woman who disappeared from Rehoboth Beach, Delaware on June 8, 1975.

Song had been born and raised in South Korea and moved to the U.S. in late 1974 after she married an American serviceman, Alton Joseph. By the time of her disappearance, mere months into their marriage, the couple was having unspecified problems, and Song told people she was being followed around by a Korean-speaking man.

It really doesn’t look good for her and I feel deeply sorry for her. I mean, she was a young woman who moved to another country, another culture, to have a happy life, a better life than she might have expected in South Korea, and then everything so rapidly went sideways.

This concludes my Asian Pacific American Heritage Month posts. See you next year.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: James Goh

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I’m profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP every day for the month of May. Today’s case is James Junhee Goh, a Korean-American 23-year-old who disappeared from Rancho Palos Verdes, California on February 24, 2008.

It’s no mystery what happened: he was swept out to sea near this lighthouse and presumed drowned after saving a friend from the same fate.

Goh’s body was never found and probably never will be at this date, but he died a hero.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Anwesha Dey

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Anwesha Dey, a 30-year-old woman of Indian nationality who disappeared from Lincoln, Nebraska on May 3, 2015. She had moved to the area to attend graduate school at the University of Nebraska.

We basically know what happened; it’s a matter of finding her. Anwesha was walking home from a friend’s house when she fell into a creek. It wasn’t deep, but it had a strong current and she couldn’t swim. She was swept away and is presumed drowned.

No one was around I guess, but her last moments were captured by a surveillance camera owned by a nearby business.

Anwesha’s body could theoretically have made it all the way to the Atlantic Ocean.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Hiep Luu

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Hiep T. Luu, a 21-year-old Vietnamese immigrant who disappeared from Berwyn, Illinois on December 15, 2003.

Luu had moved to the U.S. in the 1990s and was living with his parents, sisters and brother-in-law. He was last seen when he left home to drive to work. He never arrived and was never heard from again.

I don’t have much information on this case, but as his car is missing also, I have to wonder if he got into an accident of some kind. Driving conditions in the midwest in the wintertime can be rather horrible. It’s a forty-minute drive from Berwyn to Woodridge, the town where his job was, and I note several forest preserves dotting the area. I wonder how thoroughly these have been searched.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Aarshiya and Jiaa Patil

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is the sisters Aarshiya Manish Patil and Jiaa Manish Patil, who disappeared together from Thornton, Colorado on Christmas Eve, 2010. They were three and one respectively.

The children, who are of Indian descent, are classified as family abduction victims. Their mother, Ritu Hemchandra Desai, took apparently them to India. They may be living in the city of Pune, a major city in the state of Maharashtra on the eastern coast of India.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Dawood Kullo

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Dawood Kullo, a 39-year-old of Pakistani descent who disappeared from Houston, Texas on March 27, 1995.

Kullo had an argument with his girlfriend and stomped out the day he disappeared. I normally consider give the significant other a serious side-eye in such cases, but Kullo was seen at a bar after the argument so who knows what happened to him. Unfortunately I don’t have a lot of information.

About his name: the Arabic version of David is pronounced something like Dah-ood and it’s transliterated in a lot of different ways, such as Daud, Daoud, Da’ud, and…Dawood. Pakistanis speak Urdu, not Arabic, but both Pakistanis and Arabic speakers are all mostly Muslim, and what I’m trying to say here is that Kullo’s name is basically “David David Kullo.”

I wonder if “David” is actually a nickname/Anglicization rather than his legal middle name, especially as NamUs has his name given as “Dawood (David) Kullo.”

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Diane Suzuki

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Diane Yayoe Suzuki, a 19-year-old of Japanese descent who disappeared from Aiea, Hawaii on July 6, 1985. She was a student at the University of Hawaii and a part-time dance instructor, and apparently disappeared from work. Some blood was found in the dance studio bathroom.

The suspect in her disappearance is Dewey Hamasaki, a photographer at the dance studio who knew Diane. There was never enough evidence to charge him, and the case remains unsolved after over 30 years.