43 years ago

Per this article, the authorities have finally identified Rudy Redd Victor, a 20-year-old Native American man from New Mexico, 43 years after his disappearance. (The article gives his date of disappearance as June 15, 1974; the Charley Project has it as July 21. Shrug. Perhaps July 21 is the date he was reported missing.) Anyway:

A decade after he fled the car during a fight with his girlfriend, who Victor was traveling with on their way back to his family’s home in Colorado, a skull was turned into the Lewis and Clark County coroner.

The skull was actually first found two years prior in the same canyon by a brand inspector, who kept the skull as a souvenir of sorts after locating it while wrangling cattle on the steep hillside in 1982.

Investigators visited the hillside and found more remains, including the lower jaw. They also found a cross with a turquoise center and remnants of a red T-shirt next to a pine tree.

[…]

Air Force investigators traveled to Wolf Creek to see the hillside where Victor’s remains were found. They, alongside the county coroner, a detective in the original case and others, climbed the steep terrain to the tree where it is believed Victor died. During the initial investigation into the case, officials found a wire noose hanging from the tree. Suicide is suspected… 

The official death certificate lists the cause of death as undetermined.

All I can say is…never say never.

Flashback Friday: Dermot Kelly

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Dermot Faulkner Kelly, who disappeared from Oglesby, Illinois on January 30, 1972, at the age of sixteen. The circumstances of his case make it unclear whether he died in a drowning accident/suicide or, perhaps, left of his own accord to make a new life elsewhere. If he did run away he didn’t take anything with him, and there hasn’t been any sign of him since 1972.

Make-a-List Monday: Special needs children

This list is of kids who were under 18 when they disappeared, who had serious medical conditions. I’m talking about the sort of thing that would have them frequently hospitalized and/or put in special education classes at school.

  1. Patrick Kennedy Alford Jr., 7 (ADHD and possibly emotional problems)
  2. Steven Eugene Anderson, 17 (moderately mentally disabled)
  3. Marble Ace Arvidson, 17 (behavioral problems, classified as a special needs child)
  4. Kevin Jay Ayotte, 3 (developmentally disabled, hearing-impaired and with limited speech skills)
  5. Nicholas Patrick Barclay, 13 (ADD)
  6. Allison Taylor Bayliss, 15 (Asperger’s Syndrome aka high-functioning autism)
  7. Emad Ali Ben-Mrad, 3 (hearing-impaired)
  8. Samuel Savage Becker Boehlke, 8 (Asperger’s Syndrome)
  9. Edward Dylan Bryant, 9 (ADHD)
  10. Fidelmar Liborio Cadenas, 10 months (unknown, but said to be “medically fragile”)
  11. Monica Cassandra Carrasco, 16 (anorexia and depression)
  12. Kevin Andrew McCarthy Collins, 10 (dyslexia)
  13. Cassie Kay Compton, 15 (possible bipolar disorder or depression)
  14. Jeremy Ray Coots, 4 (severely hearing-impaired)
  15. Carla Rebecca Corley, 14 (epilepsy)
  16. Chris Andrew Cunningham, 6 (seizures)
  17. Christopher Gage Daniel, 7 (unspecified, just says he’s classified as a special needs child)
  18. Mark Anthony Degner, 12 (developmentally delayed with bipolar disorder)
  19. Landon Lee Deriggi, 13 (severely hyperactive, visually impaired and learning-disabled)
  20. Adji Desir, 6 (severely mentally disabled and almost completely nonverbal)
  21. Christian Taylor Ferguson, 9 (severely physically and mentally disabled due to a prior stroke, needs life-sustaining medication)
  22. Andrea R. Gonzalez, 5 (severe emotional and behavorial problems)
  23. David Eduardo Gosnell, 3 (developmentally delayed)
  24. Ember Skye Graham, 6 months (epilepsy)
  25. Kenneth Warren Hager, 11 (mentally disabled and mute, severe epilepsy)
  26. Jyrine Kyese Harris, 2 (ostogensis imperfecta, aka brittle bones)
  27. Justin Phillip Harris, 13 (mentally disabled and cannot function without psychiatric medication)
  28. Bryan Andrew Hayes, 13 (developmentally delayed with bipolar disorder)
  29. James P. Higham III, 16 (mentally disabled with developmental and emotional issues)
  30. Mark Joseph Himebaugh, 11 (emotionally disturbed with behavioral problems and possible OCD)
  31. James Richard Howell, 9 (hyperactive)
  32. Elisabeth Ann Huster, 9 (hyperactive)
  33. John Christopher Inman, 17 (seizures)
  34. Danny Randall Jackson, 12 (ADHD)
  35. Tiahease Tiawanna Jackson, 10 (diabetes, high blood pressure, a kidney disorder and learning disabilities)
  36. Hevin Dakota James Lee Jenkins, 2 (autistic and nonverbal)
  37. Shanta Marie Johnson, 3 (exposed to cocaine in utero; classified as a special needs child)
  38. Lenoria Eleise Anne Jones, 3 (exposed to cocaine in utero, had ADHD)
  39. Barry James Kephart II, 11 (dyslexia)
  40. Adam Benjamin Lake, 17 (Crohn’s Disease)
  41. Patricia Ann LeBlanc, 15 (“unspecified condition that may endanger her welfare”)
  42. Marjorie Christina Luna, 8 (hearing-impaired)
  43. Louis Anthony MacKerley, 7 (hyperactive and learning-disabled)
  44. Dennis Lloyd Martin, 6 (learning-disabled and slightly developmentally delayed)
  45. Tiana Neshelle Martin, 10 (Graves Disease, a potentially fatal autoimmune disorder)
  46. Ashley Renee Martinez, 15 (bipolar disorder)
  47. Clayton Lynn McCarter, 15 (mentally disabled)
  48. Betty McCullough, 10 (deaf and mute, and said to be terminally ill though I’m not sure why)
  49. Alexandra Marie McIntire, 7 months (premature, developmentally delayed, lung problems)
  50. Brandy Lynn Myers, 13 (brain damage)
  51. Tristen Alan Myers, 4 (severe behavioral problems, possibly had ADD, was possibly mentally disabled)
  52. Amy Sue Pagnac, 13 (seizures and possibly bipolar disorder)
  53. William Fred Patient, 16 (ADHD, bipolar disorder and substance abuse issues)
  54. Larry Wayne Perry, 9 (moderately mentally disabled)
  55. Robert Thomas Pillsen-Rahier, 15 (behavioral and emotional problems)
  56. Bianca Noel Piper, 13 (ADHD and severe bipolar disorder)
  57. Angelo Gene Puglisi, 10 (epilepsy)
  58. Blake Wade Pursley, 14 (seizures, partial paralysis, and learning and behavioral problems)
  59. Eric Wayne Pyles, 12 (severe emotional and behavioral problems)
  60. Jaliek L. Rainwalker, 13 (severe emotional and behavioral problems including reactive attachment disorder, exposed to cocaine and alcohol in utero, can be violent)
  61. Natasha Marie Shanes, 6 (epilepsy, developmentally delayed)
  62. Jason Sims Jr., 15 (said to be autistic and nonverbal)
  63. Austin William Sparks, 15 (severe emotional problems)
  64. Roland Jack Spencer III, 3 (mentally disabled, hearing-impaired, can’t really walk, seizures)
  65. Aleacia Di’onne Stancil, 9 months (premature, born addicted to drugs)
  66. Brandi Jondell Summers, 5 (cystic fibrosis)
  67. Amber Jean Swartz-Garcia, 7 (hearing-impaired)
  68. Ricky Lane Thomas Jr., 13 (severe behavior problems, could be violent)
  69. Wilfredo Torres (learning disability)
  70. Daffany Sherika Tullos, 7 (epilepsy)
  71. Alissa Marie Turney, 17 (ADHD)
  72. David Clayton Warner, 12 (epilepsy)
  73. Brittany Renee Williams, 7 (AIDS)
  74. David Edward Williams, 13 (mentally disabled and has seizures)
  75. Fredrick James Workman, 15 (ADHD and ODD — that is, oppositional defiant disorder)
  76. Daniel Ted Yuen, 16 (depression and other emotional problems)

Flashback Friday: Ronald Zellmer

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Ronald LeRoy Zellmer, who disappeared from Sioux City, Iowa on April 6, 1985 at the age of 31, and his car was found abandoned on a bridge just over in the border in Nebraska during the wee hours. Zellmer had depression and the police don’t seem to be sure whether he committed suicide or whether something else, such as abduction, happened to him.

Make-a-List Monday: Parents who took their own lives

This list is for cases where one of the MP’s parents (or both, in theory, though I don’t think there are any of those) committed suicide after the MP went missing. I’m sure the tremendous strain caused by the missing child contributes significantly to depression, etc., which leads in turn to the person’s death. I have decided not to include cases where the parent was a suspect in the MP’s disappearance.

  1. Rogelio Realme Cerda
  2. Frederick Andrew Holmes
  3. Katya Marie Lyne
  4. Diane Nguyen Robbins
  5. Anna Christian Waters
  6. Alan John Westerfield and Terry Lee Westerfield*

*I know it doesn’t say that in their casefiles, but the boys’ biological father killed himself several years after they vanished.

Flashback Friday: Charles Howard Bolter

This week’s Flashback Friday is Charles Howard Bolter, a 69-year-old man who disappeared from Waterford, California two days before Christmas in 1972. His car was found abandoned sometime after his disappearance with the keys still in the ignition, and this is the last sign of him.

Nine days before his disappearance, Bolter was robbed by three men who forced him to withdraw $30,000 from his bank accounts. (According to the Inflation Calculator, that’s the equivalent of about $165,000 in today’s money.) As far as I know, no suspects were ever arrested or identified. Although the robbery might suggest Bolter met with foul play — perhaps the perpetrators decided to silence him — his family thinks he may have taken his own life. If he did so, he certainly hid himself very well.

I don’t think we’re ever going to find out what happened to Charles Bolter. It’s been over forty years, after all. If he were still alive today he’d be 111 years old.

Comparison between Golden Gate Bridge suicides and other jumpers on Charley

Out of curiosity, I checked out the jumpers on this week’s list and compared them to the Golden Gate Bridge jumpers I have listed. I chose to include only those where either the cops specifically said they were sure the person had jumped, or there was a witness or the person’s stuff was found in the water. I left out those who merely left their car parked near the bridge, though I’m sure many of those also died there.

There were 21 names and as far as ages are concerned, they just about corresponded with the other list: most of them young, seven in their twenties, four in their teens (two of them only fifteen, sigh). However, in the previous list, there were almost as many females as males. Not so with the GGB list: eighteen males and only three females.

According to John Bateson’s wonderful book on the subject of Golden Gate Bridge suicides, three-quarters of the jumpers are male. 3 of 21 is only fourteen percent, though. But I suppose the additional difference might be explained by the fact that that male bodies, being heavier, might sink deeper and be less likely to be found than female ones, which is why they would appear on Charley. Just a hypothesis, mind.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: put up a barrier already. People are dying while you complain about it ruining your precious view.