Make-a-List Monday: Special needs children

This list is of kids who were under 18 when they disappeared, who had serious medical conditions. I’m talking about the sort of thing that would have them frequently hospitalized and/or put in special education classes at school.

  1. Patrick Kennedy Alford Jr., 7 (ADHD and possibly emotional problems)
  2. Steven Eugene Anderson, 17 (moderately mentally disabled)
  3. Marble Ace Arvidson, 17 (behavioral problems, classified as a special needs child)
  4. Kevin Jay Ayotte, 3 (developmentally disabled, hearing-impaired and with limited speech skills)
  5. Nicholas Patrick Barclay, 13 (ADD)
  6. Allison Taylor Bayliss, 15 (Asperger’s Syndrome aka high-functioning autism)
  7. Emad Ali Ben-Mrad, 3 (hearing-impaired)
  8. Samuel Savage Becker Boehlke, 8 (Asperger’s Syndrome)
  9. Edward Dylan Bryant, 9 (ADHD)
  10. Fidelmar Liborio Cadenas, 10 months (unknown, but said to be “medically fragile”)
  11. Monica Cassandra Carrasco, 16 (anorexia and depression)
  12. Kevin Andrew McCarthy Collins, 10 (dyslexia)
  13. Cassie Kay Compton, 15 (possible bipolar disorder or depression)
  14. Jeremy Ray Coots, 4 (severely hearing-impaired)
  15. Carla Rebecca Corley, 14 (epilepsy)
  16. Chris Andrew Cunningham, 6 (seizures)
  17. Christopher Gage Daniel, 7 (unspecified, just says he’s classified as a special needs child)
  18. Mark Anthony Degner, 12 (developmentally delayed with bipolar disorder)
  19. Landon Lee Deriggi, 13 (severely hyperactive, visually impaired and learning-disabled)
  20. Adji Desir, 6 (severely mentally disabled and almost completely nonverbal)
  21. Christian Taylor Ferguson, 9 (severely physically and mentally disabled due to a prior stroke, needs life-sustaining medication)
  22. Andrea R. Gonzalez, 5 (severe emotional and behavorial problems)
  23. David Eduardo Gosnell, 3 (developmentally delayed)
  24. Ember Skye Graham, 6 months (epilepsy)
  25. Kenneth Warren Hager, 11 (mentally disabled and mute, severe epilepsy)
  26. Jyrine Kyese Harris, 2 (ostogensis imperfecta, aka brittle bones)
  27. Justin Phillip Harris, 13 (mentally disabled and cannot function without psychiatric medication)
  28. Bryan Andrew Hayes, 13 (developmentally delayed with bipolar disorder)
  29. James P. Higham III, 16 (mentally disabled with developmental and emotional issues)
  30. Mark Joseph Himebaugh, 11 (emotionally disturbed with behavioral problems and possible OCD)
  31. James Richard Howell, 9 (hyperactive)
  32. Elisabeth Ann Huster, 9 (hyperactive)
  33. John Christopher Inman, 17 (seizures)
  34. Danny Randall Jackson, 12 (ADHD)
  35. Tiahease Tiawanna Jackson, 10 (diabetes, high blood pressure, a kidney disorder and learning disabilities)
  36. Hevin Dakota James Lee Jenkins, 2 (autistic and nonverbal)
  37. Shanta Marie Johnson, 3 (exposed to cocaine in utero; classified as a special needs child)
  38. Lenoria Eleise Anne Jones, 3 (exposed to cocaine in utero, had ADHD)
  39. Barry James Kephart II, 11 (dyslexia)
  40. Adam Benjamin Lake, 17 (Crohn’s Disease)
  41. Patricia Ann LeBlanc, 15 (“unspecified condition that may endanger her welfare”)
  42. Marjorie Christina Luna, 8 (hearing-impaired)
  43. Louis Anthony MacKerley, 7 (hyperactive and learning-disabled)
  44. Dennis Lloyd Martin, 6 (learning-disabled and slightly developmentally delayed)
  45. Tiana Neshelle Martin, 10 (Graves Disease, a potentially fatal autoimmune disorder)
  46. Ashley Renee Martinez, 15 (bipolar disorder)
  47. Clayton Lynn McCarter, 15 (mentally disabled)
  48. Betty McCullough, 10 (deaf and mute, and said to be terminally ill though I’m not sure why)
  49. Alexandra Marie McIntire, 7 months (premature, developmentally delayed, lung problems)
  50. Brandy Lynn Myers, 13 (brain damage)
  51. Tristen Alan Myers, 4 (severe behavioral problems, possibly had ADD, was possibly mentally disabled)
  52. Amy Sue Pagnac, 13 (seizures and possibly bipolar disorder)
  53. William Fred Patient, 16 (ADHD, bipolar disorder and substance abuse issues)
  54. Larry Wayne Perry, 9 (moderately mentally disabled)
  55. Robert Thomas Pillsen-Rahier, 15 (behavioral and emotional problems)
  56. Bianca Noel Piper, 13 (ADHD and severe bipolar disorder)
  57. Angelo Gene Puglisi, 10 (epilepsy)
  58. Blake Wade Pursley, 14 (seizures, partial paralysis, and learning and behavioral problems)
  59. Eric Wayne Pyles, 12 (severe emotional and behavioral problems)
  60. Jaliek L. Rainwalker, 13 (severe emotional and behavioral problems including reactive attachment disorder, exposed to cocaine and alcohol in utero, can be violent)
  61. Natasha Marie Shanes, 6 (epilepsy, developmentally delayed)
  62. Jason Sims Jr., 15 (said to be autistic and nonverbal)
  63. Austin William Sparks, 15 (severe emotional problems)
  64. Roland Jack Spencer III, 3 (mentally disabled, hearing-impaired, can’t really walk, seizures)
  65. Aleacia Di’onne Stancil, 9 months (premature, born addicted to drugs)
  66. Brandi Jondell Summers, 5 (cystic fibrosis)
  67. Amber Jean Swartz-Garcia, 7 (hearing-impaired)
  68. Ricky Lane Thomas Jr., 13 (severe behavior problems, could be violent)
  69. Wilfredo Torres (learning disability)
  70. Daffany Sherika Tullos, 7 (epilepsy)
  71. Alissa Marie Turney, 17 (ADHD)
  72. David Clayton Warner, 12 (epilepsy)
  73. Brittany Renee Williams, 7 (AIDS)
  74. David Edward Williams, 13 (mentally disabled and has seizures)
  75. Fredrick James Workman, 15 (ADHD and ODD — that is, oppositional defiant disorder)
  76. Daniel Ted Yuen, 16 (depression and other emotional problems)

MP of the week: Emily Paul

This week’s featured missing person is Emily Wynell Paul, a fourteen-year-old girl who ran away from Southport, Florida three and a half years ago, on April 13, 2013. She left a note saying she might come back after she turned eighteen. Emily will turn eighteen this coming March; here’s to hoping she does return.

As with most runaway cases, I don’t have a lot on her, but she did take her Xbox with her. I wonder if it was to sell.

(For me: I haven’t been doing all that great lately, hence my relative lack of blogging and updates. My medicine is being adjusted for the third time in as many months. I’m really hoping it works. I’ve been having godawful mood swings and falling apart over the least little thing.)

Make-a-List Monday: Bus Stops

This week’s MALM is of MPs who were last seen at the bus stop or bus station. It seems to me that people, especially women and children, are kind of vulnerable at bus stops. They’re often standing close to the curb, within grabbing distance of passing motorists. People who are waiting for the bus are often tired, distracted, perhaps hungry, perhaps with their hands full of shopping or whatever, and just generally not at their best. Maybe the weather is terrible; maybe it’s raining or snowing or blisteringly cold, or maybe it’s humid and 95 degrees in the shade. And anyone who’s waiting for a bus obviously wants to go somewhere, and if someone pulls up and offers them a car ride to their destination — especially if it’s someone they know — the person might just say yes.

I did exclude people who were last seen walking towards or away from a bus stop. There are quite a few of those. But if a person was at the bus stop about to leave, or was about to board or even had already boarded, I put them on the list (provided, in the latter instance, that the bus hadn’t left yet).

  1. Ashok Ankam
  2. Paget Renee Barr
  3. Carol Ann Batterman
  4. Susan Robin Bender
  5. James Elwood Brady
  6. Allen Briscoe Jr.
  7. Larhonda Marie Bronson
  8. Jose Moreno Caballero
  9. Fernando Paul Cardenas
  10. Kevin Andrew McCarthy Collins
  11. Ingrid Siomara Contreras
  12. Thwana Mithsell Darrough
  13. Kimberly Sue Doss
  14. Jeremiah Edward Foco*
  15. Mary Frances Gregory
  16. Gwendolyn M. Hooser
  17. Sandra Lee Hopler
  18. Rita Mae Hughes
  19. Barbara Ann Hutchinson
  20. Rochelle Maria Ihm
  21. Willie Mae Jackson
  22. Matthew Ellis Keith
  23. Joseph A. Krainak Jr.
  24. Alexandria Joy Lowitzer
  25. Faloma Luhk
  26. Maleina Quitugua Luhk
  27. Suzanne Gloria Lyall
  28. Heather Ann MacCrossen
  29. Kimberly Ann Mallard
  30. Pedro Castro Martinez
  31. Marta Alicia Michel
  32. Jackson Alexander Miller
  33. Alan Lee Morse
  34. Judith Erin O’Donnell
  35. Ariza Maria Olivares
  36. Carmen Maria Owens
  37. Byron Eric Page
  38. Francisco Robles Perez
  39. Annette Deanne Sagers
  40. Philistin Saintcyr
  41. Lloyd Melvin Thomas
  42. Kimberly Faye Thrower
  43. Delight Marie Watson
  44. John Albert Weichelt
  45. Billy Wellman
  46. Francis Loretta Heath Wells
  47. Nancy Debra Willis

*maybe

MP of the week: Nicasio Fernandez

This week’s featured missing person is Nicasio Carmona Fernandez Jr., a seventeen-year-old missing from Montclair, California. He disappeared on March 19, 1984, but for some reason he wasn’t reported missing until 1993.

As to what’s happened to him, that’s unclear: the circumstances of his disappearance would seem to indicate foul play is a possibility, but people who knew him reported having seen him alive and well in Montclair and in the Los Angeles area in the nineties.

If he’s alive, I wonder if he even knows he’s listed as a missing person.

The sadness I get from the runaways

I posted one runaway case with today’s updates, a girl from Philadelphia. I won’t say her name because, God willing, her case will get removed eventually and I don’t want this blog entry coming back to haunt her later when she applies for things like rental accommodation and college and a job.

She’s been missing since mid-October 2015 — almost thirteen months. Usually I wait two years to post kids classified as runaways, but I sometimes make exceptions if the runaway is under 14. (Don’t ask me why 14 is my arbitrary cutoff. It just is.) In this case, the girl was thirteen and a half years old.

She’s listed as 5’2 but she’s probably grown an inch or two in the past year. She’s Hispanic, but I would have mistaken her for black. She certainly seems to enjoy fixing her hair in African-American styles; one photo I found showed her with braided extensions down to her waist. But I looked up her surname, and although it doesn’t sound at all Spanish, a Puerto Rican university bears that name.

I found her Facebook account, which is not uncommon in runaway cases. Loads of them are on Facebook, and many keep active accounts even while they’re missing. I also found the girl’s Twitter account —  now THAT I’m pretty sure I’ve never found before, not for a missing person. To check and see I searched charleyproject.org for the keyword “twitter” and came up with only a link to Charley’s own Twitter feed and links to the Twitter accounts of two relatives of MPs.

Of course I could only see what this girl chose to make public, but she hadn’t updated the public part of those accounts since well over a year before her disappearance — May 2014 for Facebook, July 2014 for Twitter. (And she has 496 Twitter followers, over 5 times more than my personal Twitter has.) I snagged several pictures of her from both accounts, and wound up with twelve photos altogether, far more than average. I could have added more, actually, but generally I stop at twelve.

Now, I have no idea what her home life was like before she disappeared. All I know is the street where she lived in Philadelphia, and the elementary school she attended. (Oh, and that she has at least two brothers, probably three, maybe more. That info came from her Twitter.) I checked the school website and it’s a K-8. If you go by her age, she was probably in seventh grade, perhaps eighth, when she went missing. That’s all I know about her personal circumstances before she disappeared.

But nevertheless, the information I uncovered while putting together this child’s casefile just made me feel sad. According to the NCMEC and NamUs, she already had at least one tattoo, and perhaps more, by the time she went missing. Some of her pictures betrayed her age, but others did not; she was clearly trying to look much older than she was. One tweet, posted when she was eleven years old, said, in part, that she was “mad as SHIT” because she liked a boy who didn’t like her back. (I don’t want to quote the whole tweet on here.) Her Facebook page had a photo montage with the caption reading “Trust No Bitch.” When she posted that image, she was two weeks past her twelfth birthday.

Let me emphasize that I am not condemning this girl for her makeup and her social media posts. I think some of them are unwise, but she’s a kid, and kids make mistakes. Certainly I’ve made serious mistakes before about what I post on social media, and will probably keep doing so, and I’m an adult. I just think it’s sad because, from what limited information I have, it looks like she was growing up way too fast.

And now she’s been missing for over a year. There’s a good chance she’s got caught up in the child prostitution trade, drugs, that sort of thing. Child traffickers see kids like that as fresh meat. A child can get snatched up and devoured by those vipers within a few days of leaving home. If this girl has gotten involved with that sort of thing, as a substantial percentage of runaways do, she could be anywhere in the country, or even elsewhere in the world.

She might be too ashamed by what has happened to her to call home. She want to call home but be prevented through threats of violence or worse.

Or she might be dead, lying a slab in a morgue somewhere, or in a potter’s field. Or perhaps still undiscovered, in a shallow grave or a landfill. Think of Syllania Edwards, for example, who ran away from Oklahoma and turned up dead — on that notorious mesa in New Mexico, the youngest known victim of more than half a dozen women murdered by a serial killer who remains unidentified.

Wherever she is, this girl from Philadelphia, I hope she’s safe, and I hope she turns up alive and able to put her life back together.

Called in to the NCMEC today

I’m writing up new cases and put together a certain case featured on the NCMEC database, a 16-year-old runaway girl, missing since September 2014. I drafted a casefile based on her poster, as per usual.

When I Googled her name I found she was on NamUs, but when I clicked on the link, it said “The case you are trying to view is restricted to authorized persons ONLY.” This usually means the MP has been located, but sometimes they do this for other reasons — like when they’re comparing the MP to a UID case and they’re pretty sure it’s a match and are just waiting to confirm. I investigated further and found a press release from August, saying two missing girls — including the one I was planning to post — had been recovered.

So I made a quick call to the NCMEC’s tip line (it’s 1-800-THE-LOST, translated to 1-800-843-5678) and told the nice lady what I found. She looked up the MP’s name and confirmed that yes, she had been recovered. It looks like she got left on the NCMEC website by accident. This isn’t the first time this has happened.

The hotline person thanked me and promised to take action. And now I shall move on to other cases.