MP of the week: Edward “Ashton” Stubbs

This week’s featured missing person is Edward Ashton Stubbs, who goes by his middle name. He was less than a week shy of his 16th birthday when he walked away from his summer job in Dickinson, North Dakota and vanished on June 17, 2013.

Most agencies classify Ashton as a runaway. His family was quoted as saying he had health issues. I can’t figure out what those issues were, but I’m wondering if they were mental health issues rather than physical, since he was working a construction job and laying drywall. But I don’t know.

If Ashton is still alive, and I hope he is, he’d be 20 years old by now.

Missing Person of the Week: Uma Sewpersaud

Yeah, I was going to do a Make-a-List Monday yesterday of people who disappeared on the fourth of July, but life intervened: I got more and more manic over the weekend and as a result I was awake for two and a half days in spite of lying quietly in bed most of the time. I developed an ear infection and due to the holiday weekend, no outpatient clinics were open, so I had to go to the hospital for treatment. I was bouncing off the walls by this point and they outright asked if I was on drugs. (I was not. Except the ones I’m supposed to be taking.) Then on Monday I finally crashed and slept. all. day.

Anyway. Today’s missing person of the week is Uma Davi Sewpersaud, a thirteen-year-old girl who disappeared from Orlando, Florida on January 28, 2002. Uma is either from Guyana or at least of Guyanese parentage. Guyana is in South America but culturally, it’s Caribbean, and almost half the population is of Indian (that is, Asian) descent, including Uma.

Anyway, the cops think Uma ran away. I hope she really did and hasn’t met with foul play. I mean, it’s been 15 years now. But if she went to Guyana, as the police believe she might have, maybe that’s why she’s fallen off the map.

Oh, and I would like to note (for people who want to identify bodies) that she was tiny, even for her age, when she disappeared. Less than four and a half feet tall and just 70 pounds. (At the same age I was 5’1 or 5’2 and around 90 or 100 pounds.) Maybe if she died shortly after her disappearance and her body was found, they might have thought it was of a younger girl.

Let’s talk about it: Bryan Hayes and Mark Degner

I find the disappearance of best friends Mark Anthony Degner and Bryan Andrew Hayes puzzling and troubling. They’ve been missing from Jacksonville, Florida since February 1, 2005 — twelve years, nearly twelve and a half.

At first the circumstances of the boys’ cases look pedestrian enough: they were living in a group home, told friends they were going to run away, and apparently did just that. They were even sighted in Holly Hill, a small town south of Jacksonville on the Florida coast, two months later.

And yet.

The boys, at just twelve (Mark) and thirteen (Bryan), were extremely young to have been gone this long. Bryan had run away before, but never for longer than a day, and Mark had no history of running away. Furthermore, they were developmentally delayed, functioning on the level of seven- to ten-year-old children, and both suffered from bipolar disorder.

How could they have remained off the map this long? Did the boys meet with foul play? If they’re still alive, why haven’t they resurfaced and who’s helping them stay hidden? Were relatives investigated? Were some member or members of the boys’ families unhappy that they were living in a group home? Or is it possible they fell victim to sex trafficking? Due to their disabilities. I should think they would have been extremely vulnerable to any kind of exploitation — even more so than most runaways.

The case reminds me of Clayton Lynn McCarter and Rodney Michael Scott, who ran away from a Bowling Green, Kentucky children’s home three and a half years ago and still haven’t been found. They were almost the same age: fifteen and thirteen. Clayton was developmentally delayed and had psychiatric issues, just like Mark and Bryan, and there’s a good chance Rodney had similar problems though I don’t know that for sure. I’m not suggesting McCarter/Scott disappearances are related to Mark and Bryan’s, though, given the distance in both time and space.

So what do you think happened to Mark Degner and Bryan Hayes? Let’s talk about it.

Make-a-List Monday: Runaways with medical conditions

This article with worrying information about Clayton McCarter’s medical conditions prompted me to make a list of runaways with medical problems.

  1. Nova Cierra Awe: “may be in need of medical attention”
  2. Hailey Eli Burns: Asperger’s Syndrome and past behavioral problems, takes medications which she doesn’t have with her
  3. Lurline Michelle Bergeron: history of drug abuse
  4. Emily Bracamontes: “may be in need of medical attention”
  5. Jason Wayne Dennis: suicidal
  6. Martha Wes Dunn: “may be in need of medical attention”, heavily involved with drugs
  7. Shimeaka Renee Gibson: lupus
  8. John Christopher Inman: has a shunt in his skull, needs anti-seizure medication which he doesn’t have with him
  9. Janteyl Danielle Johnson: pregnant
  10. Ashley Renee Martinez: bipolar disorder
  11. Clayton Lynn McCarter: ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder, mentally disabled and functions at a five-year-old level, takes psychiatric medication
  12. Cynthia Lorraine Perry: history of drug abuse
  13. Rachel Geraldine Pratt: pregnant
  14. Cindy D. Valle: pregnant
  15. Glenna Jean White: needs medication
  16. Daniel Ted Yuen: depression and emotional problems, possibly a danger to self and others
  17. Elsa Janell Wind: possibly pregnant
  18. Fredrick James Workman: ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder, needs medication