National Hispanic Heritage Month: Marisela Pino

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Marisela Pino, who also may use the surname Pino-Vasquez or Vasquez-Pino. Marisela was eleven years old when she disappeared from Waterbury, Connecticut on March 20, 1993. She was last seen in the vicinity of a Nash’s Pizza & Groceries. The business, it seems, no longer exists, at least not under that name.

I found Cherry Street on Google Earth satellite view, but I don’t really know how to use Google Earth and I can’t figure out to access street view. Today, anyway, it appears to be in a working-class residential neighborhood. It may have appeared much different in 1993.

It bothers me that there is almost no information available on this case. Until recent years it wasn’t even listed with the NCMEC. I mean, this is a little girl, and it looks like this could well have been an abduction. By contrast, the unsolved disappearance of ten-year-old Bianca Lebron, a Hispanic child who went missing from Bridgeport, Connecticut eight years later, received a lot of media attention.

Does Marisela have a family? Do they still live in Connecticut? Perhaps there was a language barrier and that was a problem when her case came to getting the press attention it deserved?

Marisela has a possible scar on her left ankle, and a possible burn scar (described as “duck-shaped”) on her chest or abdomen. She was last seen wearing a black and gray jacket, a green and white shirt, jeans or a green denim skirt, white socks and blue shoes. If she is still alive today, she’d be 38 this month.

That’s all I know.

MP of the week: Melissa Espinoza

This week’s featured missing person (I’m sorry it’s late) is Melissa Ann Espinoza, a twelve-year-old girl who disappeared from Rancho Cordova, California on December 2, 1993.

She was last seen hanging out at her old apartment complex; her family had moved after a fire. The complex was in a bad neighborhood and Melissa is considered missing under suspicious circumstances and a probable abduction victim, but no suspects have been made and one seems to know anything.

Later today, I’m off to the zoo. Perhaps I’ll run into CrimeBlogger1983 again.

MP of the week: Nickolas Pogoneys

I’m sorry this week’s featured missing person was featured late; I was being lazy and irresponsible. Anyway, this week it’s Nickolas Pogoneys, a 58-year-old man who disappeared from Apple Valley, California on December 1, 1993. They found his car with all his stuff inside, including his dentures, but the keys were missing.

Native American Heritage Month: Virginia Pictou-Noyes

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Virginia Sue Pictou-Noyes, a 26-year-old member of the Mi’kmaq Indian Nation who disappeared from Bangor, Maine on April 24, 1993. The Mi’kmaq are live in the maritime provinces and Quebec in Canada, and in northern Maine.

Virginia seems to have had a very sad life. She had her first baby at fourteen, and dropped out of high school in her junior year. Three additional babies later, she married Larry Noyes and had three children by him, making a total of seven. Two of Virginia’s children died in a house fire in 1990.

Virginia was allegedly assaulted by Larry and his brother, Roger, and had to be hospitalized. This article has some details about what happened:

[Virginia’s brother] Robert Pictou said there was a dispute inside the bar and Pictou Noyes started walking toward the door to leave.

“Larry ran up behind her and jump-kicked her out the door,” Robert Pictou testified.

“She fell on the pavement face first and he jumped on her. He pinned her down, he put his knees on her arms and proceeded to beat her. Her brother-in-law came after him, kneeled down next to his brother and proceeded to beat my sister in the face.”

On the day of her disappearance, after a visit from her husband and brother-in-law, she left the hospital without permission and was last seen at a truck stop trying to get a ride home. After Virginia disappeared, the charges against Larry and Roger were dropped, presumably because there was no complaining witnessed.

Foul play is suspected in her case, and Larry and Roger are the prime suspects in her disappearance. Roger is dead, and Larry is drifting around Bangor as a transient when he’s not in jail for some violent offense or other.

Pride Month: Allen Livingston

In honor of Pride Month I’m featuring a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer missing person every day for the month of June. Today’s case is Allen Lee Livingston, a 27-year-old gay man who disappeared from Indianapolis, Indiana on August 6, 1993.

Livingston may have been a victim of the serial killer Herb Baumeister, who targeted young gay men in the Indianapolis area. However, his body wasn’t among the eleven unearthed on Baumeister’s property in 1996. So…shrug.

Pride Month: Christine Markey

In honor of Pride Month I’m featuring a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer missing person every day for the month of June. Today’s case is Christine Marie Markey, a 22-year-old bisexual woman who disappeared from Oneida, New York on January 10, 1993.

She had an altercation with her live-in girlfriend on the night of her disappearance; their relationship was troubled. Their landlord saw them go into their apartment together, but what happened after that is a mystery.

Christine never picked up her last paychecks from either of her two jobs. Her disappearance is considered suspicious.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Consuelo Vannausdle

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Consuelo R. “Connie” Vannausdle, a 31-year-old Filipino-American woman who disappeared from Lacey, Washington on April 25, 1993.

She may have been pregnant at the time of her disappearance, and her husband Mark said she was depressed and possibly suicidal, but the police doubt Mark’s claims.

Foul play is suspected in Consuelo’s disappearance, and Mark seems to be the prime suspect. He claimed she simply walked out on him and their two kids. He never reported her missing; her sister in California finally did in July, over two months after she was last seen.

In addition, Mark is definitely a violent man; in 2002, he shot a cab driver (not fatally) and stole the person’s cab. He pleaded guilty to first-degree assault and first-degree robbery and got a twenty-year sentence. In 2004, prison officials found steroids and an “escape kit” in his cell. Lovely man.

The coroner issued a death certificate for Consuelo in 2008. I hope their children were looked after by someone responsible.

(An aside: I find it interesting that “Consuelo” is a woman’s name, because almost all female names in Spanish end with A. In fact, Consuelo is the only one I can think of that ends with an O. You’d think it would be Consuela instead, but Consuelo is the norm. Shrug.)