MP of the week: Stephanie Chavez

This week’s featured missing person is Stephanie Chavez, a sixteen-year-old Hispanic girl who disappeared from Palm Beach Gardens, Florida on February 8, 2013. She’s listed as a runaway and may have left with a man named Alex Arroyo. I have a photo of him but no other information. They may be in Mexico.

Stephanie would be 24 years old today. It’s worth noting that she is very short, under five feet tall. Somewhere between four feet one and four feet eight. She may use the last name Arroyo, same as Alex.

MP of the week: Adrian Poleahla

This week’s featured missing person is Adrian Curtis Poleahla, a Native American man who disappeared from Keams Canyon, Arizona on January 25, 2011. He was supposedly en route to Phoenix. His family, who hadn’t heard from him since August 2010, reported him missing in April 2012.

Poleahla is a talented wood carver and his kachina carvings fetched pretty good prices at galleries. The circumstances of his disappearance are unclear, but I hope he’s still out there. He’d be about 53 today.

Really good longread about Taalibah Islam and Typhenie Johnson

I regularly check the ididitforjodie website for links to articles about missing persons and other cold cases. I wanted to mention it here cause it’s awesome. Today I found a link to this article about the 2006 disappearance of Taalibah Fatin Bint Islam and the 2016 disappearance of Typhenie Kae Johnson. Both women had been dating the same man, he was the last person known to have seen them, and he told the same story as to what happened to each of them. The suspect, Christopher Revill, was convicted of kidnapping in Typhenie’s case but has never been charged in Taalibah’s.

It’s a really sad story, and so typical of domestic violence cases. The article is very detailed and well worth a read.

MP of the week: Isaac Robin

Hi, all. This week’s featured missing person is from the U.S. Virgin Islands; I think he might be the first Virgin Islands case I’ve ever made missing person of the week. Isaac Robin Jr., a twenty-year-old black man, disappeared on January 29, 2010.

A short geography lesson: the Virgin Islands are an archipelago in the Caribbean Sea; some British overseas territorial possessions, some are considered a part of the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, and the rest comprise another U.S. territory, formally called the Virgin Islands of the United States. There are three main U.S. Virgin Islands and fifty or so tiny ones. Not many people live on the island of St. John; the main population is split roughly equally between St. Thomas (where the capital city, Charlotte Amalie, is located) and St. Croix (from where Isaac Robin disappeared).

Unfortunately I don’t really have any details about Isaac’s disappearance. He was last seen near his home and was reported missing by his family four days later. For what it’s worth, he didn’t disappear during hurricane season, which runs between June and November.

A year or two ago I spoke with a journalist from the Virgin Islands; I think it was the same woman who wrote this article about Virgin Islands missing persons. I asked her, given how tiny the land area is and how many tourists go tromping through islands, if it would be possible for a body to go undiscovered on land. She said the islands have a lot of thick tangles of tropical jungle where a person could be walking just a few feet from a corpse and have no idea. I am not going to speculate what happened to Isaac Robin, but I thought it was worth including that information.

If still alive, he would be 31 today. He’s been missing for ten, going on eleven years.

Thank you all for my birthday and wedding good wishes. I appreciate it.

MP of the week: Jeremy Ashley

I hope everyone had a good Labor Day weekend. Mine wasn’t the best; I’m anxious about the political situation and the pandemic situation and my coming wedding. At this point, planning this ceremony is basically trying to make the best of a bad situation: we can’t have the party we want because we don’t want to kill anybody, and it’s a matter of trying to salvage what we can. Which is awful, but there’s nothing to be done.

This week’s featured missing person is Jeremy Dewayne Ashley, a 29-year-old man who disappeared from the seaside town of Trinidad in Humboldt County, California on November 11, 2017. He was hiking with a friend when he slipped and fell into the ocean, and got pulled out to sea.

Ashley’s case isn’t exactly a mystery, but his body has never been found, and if it washes up somewhere it would be nice if it could be identified.

MP of the week: Angel Rose Avery

This week’s featured missing person is Angel Rose Avery, a 35-year-old woman who disappeared from Kennett, Missouri on September 1, 2018. Hers is a “few details are available” case; I know nothing else about the case. I was able to snag a few additional photos of her from social media.

If still alive, Angel would be 37 today.

Because this isn’t suspicious or anything…

I invite all Charley Project blog readers to also read this article about the 2019 disappearance of Angela Green from Prairie Village, Kansas. It’s a pretty interesting story to say the least. And it stinks. Badly. I’m sure the police are every bit as suspicious as I am but it seems like there’s not a lot of evidence; it’s as much about what ISN’T there as what is.

I feel deeply sorry for Angela’s daughter; she’s in a bad position right now and through no fault of her own. I really hope she gets answers soon.

MP of the week: Sarah Hill

This week’s featured missing person is Sarah Ashley Hill, a 33-year-old woman who disappeared from Stuart, Virginia on June 6, 2018. After her disappearance, her car was found abandoned in a store parking lot. She had some substance abuse issues and lived a somewhat transient life.

There was actually an article published about Sarah’s case the other day but it didn’t have much in the way of new info, just that they did another search in late July. If still alive she’d be 35 today.

MP of the week: Stratis Elmore

This week’s featured missing person is Stratis Elias Elmore, a nineteen-year-old young man of Greek and Hispanic descent who disappeared from Roseville, California on October 19, 2017.

It’s unclear whether his disappearance was a suicide, or a faked suicide. He was facing criminal charges at the time of his disappearance and he had a record, and the police think he might just have done a runner, but his mom thinks he might be dead. In any case, three years is a long time for a teenager to drop completely under the radar.

NCMEC search becomes slightly less terrible, and more news

I first complained about the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s search engine back in 2013, and things got even worse with later versions of it. However, when I checked today, they’d made yet another version, which is slightly better than the last. Like, you can now search based on how old the child was when they disappeared. That’s kind of nice, I guess.

You still don’t have the ability to search by category, which they axed in 2013. As far as I can tell it’s because the NCMEC decided to phase out categories. They did this because when people saw “Family Abduction” or “Runaway” they just automatically tuned it out. I can understand the logic of the NCMEC’s thinking there.

I added Duke Flores‘s case today. It’s pretty awful. Probably not as bad as Noah McIntosh‘s (I blogged about his case in March), but it’s still pretty bad.

The whole story about Duke’s murder being prompted by his attempt he was trying to kill his infant cousin looks a little sketchy at first glance. However, both women gave the police the same account of the alleged attempted murder, and I wonder if Duke, who had autism, was just unable to deal with the baby’s crying. Most people with autism (including me) are very sensitive to noises.

They tried to cover up his disappearance by saying they’d taken Duke to a psychiatric hospital. If he was indeed trying to kill his cousin, this would have been a perfectly appropriate action to take. Certainly much more appropriate than strangling him.

We’ll never know if he really tried to smother the baby or not; the only two people alive to tell the story aren’t exactly credible witnesses. But no matter what he did there’s no excuse for murdering a six-year-old child with a disability.

The thing about his mom and aunt taking the other kids along while they disposed of his body is horrifying. Though the alternative would have been leaving them alone at home, and they were both really little. Hopefully too little to remember this later.

I hope these women get what’s coming to them. They are probably not very popular in jail; most of the women prisoners are mothers too.