MP of the week: Kristi Krebs

This week’s featured missing person is Kristi Suzanne Krebs, a 22-year-old woman who disappeared from Fort Bragg, California on August 9, 1993. She had had one nervous breakdown before and may have suffered another that precipitated her disappearance.

Her car was found stuck in a creek in a state park, with no sign of her. Among the items left inside were her wallet and ID, as well as her undergarments — but not her other clothes. There’s been no sign of her since.

In other news, I’m feeling much better, nausea gone etc. And I’ve renewed my subscription to Ancestry till February so I can get photos from there; it’s an excellent resource for that. For example, I’ve found a photo of Howard Woolwine that I’ve replaced his previous photo with. Not only was the previous pic (supplied by the Virginia State Police missing persons listing) of very poor quality, but I’ve never been sure it was him; it appears to show a young black or Hispanic man, and Woolwine was an elderly white man.

The Ancestry subscription is expensive, $80 for just three months’ use, so I’m not sure how long I can continue to use it, but it’s mine till February.

I’ve been busy all day but hope I can get a proper update in tomorrow evening.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.

Native American Heritage Month: Sumi Juan

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Sumi Gail Juan, a 33-year-old Hoopa woman who disappeared from Hoopa, California on September 8, 2010.

Hoopa, California is a town in northern California and per Wikipedia, 80-plus percentage of the population is Native.

The police noted they had two persons of interest, also Native, whom they wanted to talk to: Robert Hodge Jr. and Debra Jealous-Of-Him.

It’s worth noting I’ve found NO mention AT ALL about Sumi since 2010 and I’m not 100% sure she is still missing.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Victor Ramirez

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Victor Mora Saul Ramirez, who disappeared from Huntington Park, California on January 3, 2012, at the age of twenty.

Ramirez may use the first name Saul, or the last name Mora. He may be driving a 1993 Chrysler Concorde with the California license plate number 3CTX681. If still alive, he’d be 28 today. I don’t have anything else on him.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Amalia Perez

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Amalia Perez, a 78-year-old woman who disappeared from Los Angeles, California on January 2, 1991.

No info on circumstances are available, but she’s noted to be a dependent adult. A lot of people that age are.

She is most definitely deceased by now due to time constraints (she’d be 107 today) but I’m sure her relatives would still like to learn what happened to her.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Miriam Guillen

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Miriam Daniela Guillen, who disappeared from Arleta, California on September 3, 2014, at the age of sixteen. She’s classified as a runaway.

Miriam’s hair was dyed blonde and cut in a mohawk at the time of her disappearance, and she has facial piercings, gauged ears and numerous tattoos. Her age-progression on her NCMEC poster shows what two of the tattoos are meant to look like: the spiderweb on her shoulder, and “HORROR” in large black letters on her upper chest. A pretty distinctive appearance.

Miriam is probably still alive, though she doesn’t seem to have surfaced on the radar in the past five years. She would be 21 today.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Enrique Garibay Ruiz

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Enrique Garibay Ruiz, a 51-year-old who disappeared from Los Angeles, California on October 5, 2017. Two years ago, less a day.

Garibay Ruiz is originally from Mexico, and he traveled to Hungary for college and decided to stay. He lived there with his wife and two kids and had some pretty prestigious jobs: professor, nuclear physicist, mathematician and writer.

He went to Los Angeles for vacation and disappeared on the day he was supposed to fly back. He called his wife and said he was on standby for his return flight, but that doesn’t make sense to me — surely if that was the case, he would have returned his rental car, and he didn’t. In fact the car has never been found. So Garibay Ruiz was lying? If so, why?

He never made his flight and was never seen again. The last sign of him is on October 6, when his credit card was used at a restaurant.

From what I can see it looks like a voluntary disappearance, but it’s entirely on the cards that there’s a lot more going on here that I’m just unaware of.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Agustin Zeferino

(I had pre-written cases for September 30 and October 1, using the app on my phone. I didn’t realize until very late on October 1 that neither of them went up, and in fact they seem to have vanished. I need to stop using that app to try to write entries; it never seems to work well. I am trying to reconstruct the entries from memory.)

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Agustin Zeferino, who disappeared from Santa Barbara County, California on August 11, 2014. He was a farm worker, probably a migrant.

Zeferino’s case is kind of unusual and scary because he was undergoing treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis at the time of his disappearance, and he was supposed to take medication for up to two years.

Although he was asymptomatic and not contagious at the time of his disappearance, since he disappeared he’s obviously stopped the treatments and he would have become contagious again and started developing symptoms again. As Zeferino’s disease is a threat to public health, a warrant has been issued for his arrest.

Without treatment, about there’s about a 50-50 chance that tuberculosis will kill you, unless you’re HIV positive that is, in which case it’s extremely lethal. The illness kills slowly; untreated, about one-third of patients die within two years and another third within five years. The person is ambulatory for most of that time — I think Edgar Allen Poe’s wife went dancing the same night her TB finally killed her — and spreading it everywhere they go.

I really really hope Zeferino is okay and just moved on, and that he has resumed his treatments wherever he is now, perhaps in another country. Because if he didn’t resume his treatment, he’s probably dead now, and he’s probably made other people sick.