What the heck?

I was in the process of drawing up a Make-a-List Monday when I went and checked the NamUs entry for Timothy Scott Parry, and on the “physical” section of his NamUs page, it says he had “Cro-Magnon eyebrows.”

Who on earth put that in? Maybe it’s just me, but I find that pretty offensive, especially given that Timothy was physically and mentally disabled. I would be offended if I was a family member or friend of Timothy’s. His eyebrows don’t even look that strange to me in the pictures, just a bit thicker than usual.

I doubt whoever put that into NamUs was trying to upset anyone. This other picture, included in the NamUs profile, is a scanned copy of a paper flier for Timothy, and it says “Cro-Magnon eyebrows.” My guess is that whoever entered the info into NamUs just copied it without thinking. But I think it should be rephrased.

It reminds me of another MP case profiled on another website, not NamUs, where it said the female MP had a “tramp stamp.” That’s derogatory term for a tattoo on a woman’s lower back. The term, in addition to being offensive, could also be confusing for people, perhaps non-English speakers, who don’t know what a “tramp stamp” means. They should have just said she had a tattoo on her lower back. With Timothy, they could say he has a protruding brow ridge or something that doesn’t sound like they’re making fun of him.

(If you’re wondering, btw, why I sometimes talk on this blog about issues I think NamUs should fix, it’s not to make them look bad. I think NamUs is a great resource, as evidenced by how often I use it for Charley Project research. Rather, it’s because some of the people who volunteer for it don’t like me and have made this abundantly clear, and I’m afraid they wouldn’t listen to me if I emailed them privately about the issue.)

Flashback Friday: Irene Matheson

(Sorry, I accidentally posted my Select It Sunday post today instead of Flashback Friday. I removed it immediately and rescheduled it for Sunday. I missed both FF and SIS last week; my apologies. Ironically, it was because I was so busy harvesting website update info that I forgot all about those regular weekly blog features until it was too late. And it’s almost too late tonight; it’s after eleven. I ought to start pre-scheduling these like I usually do with my Make-a-List Mondays.)

This week’s FF case is Irene M. Matheson. She barely qualifies; Flashback Friday cases are for people who disappeared before my birthdate of October 5, 1985, and she disappeared on October 1 of that year. I added her in late 2014 and haven’t updated her case since.

Irene, who vanished from her home in Miami, was 69 disappeared; she would now be 100 years old if she’s still alive. I don’t have much on her. I think she left her home of her own accord, because her car disappeared and she left the doors locked. There were some dishes in the sink but I’m not sure how significant that is; some people wash their dishes right away after a meal (or coffee in this case; there was only a coffee cup and a spoon), and some people wait.

Other than the dirty dishes the home was clean and neat with no indications of a struggle. Irene’s car turned up in an apartment complex parking lot, also neat and clean with no indications of a crime. Oddly enough, although Irene had been missing for two months by then, the car had only been in that parking lot for a week.

I would like to know whether Irene suffered from dementia or any other condition that would cause her to become disoriented and wander away. I think not, because none of the articles I found mention it and because she was working at the time of her disappearance, but I wish I knew for sure.

There’s been no press about this case since December 1985, a few days after her car was found.

R.I.P., Irene.

ET: Con O’Leary

Another Executed Today post: Irish fratricide Cornelius “Con” O’Leary. He was convicted of the murder of his brother Patrick and hanged in 1925. It was a pretty brutal crime — the victim brutally attacked, probably as he slept, then dismembered.

All of the family members who still lived at home were charged with murder: Con, the family’s elderly mother and two sisters, Maryanne and Hannah. If there were witnesses to the crime, they never talked; all the evidence was circumstantial. I’m sure Con was guilty. As for the others, I think they may well have guilty knowledge, but I’m not at all convinced they were directly involved in Patrick’s murder.

The mother (I don’t remember her name) was released without being tried due to ill health. Maryanne, who was probably not involved, died of cancer while awaiting trial. Hannah was convicted — unjustly, I believe. I don’t know whether she was guilty or not, but the case against her was very weak and the judge, I think, biased. She served 17 years in prison before being released.

The Trail Went Cold

I do give occasional shout-outs to other MP blogs and websites and so on. Here’s another: a podcast called The Trail Went Cold, which discusses unsolved murders and missing persons every two weeks. I found out about them after their Twitter feed followed my Twitter feed.

I’ve only listened to one episode, the most recent one, about Dannette and Jeannette Millbrooks, but I liked it and learned some stuff about their cases — most of it frankly horrifying — and plan to listen to the other episodes. Robin Warder, who runs the podcast, also writes for Cracked.

MP of the week: Pamela Biggers

This week’s featured missing person is Pamela Pendley Biggers, a 52-year-old woman who disappeared from Panama City Beach, Florida on January 27, 2008. She actually lived in Hueytown, Alabama, a five-hour drive away, but was in Florida on business.

Pamela was under a lot of stress when she disappeared because her son was about to be deployed to Afghanistan. She was actually experiencing some serious signs of mental illness, including auditory hallucinations, and her doctor thought she might have developed schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, but Pamela refused to see a psychiatrist.

If she had in fact only just gotten bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, her case was highly unusual; those illnesses usually develop in the late adolescent or early adult years, and Pamela was middle-aged. That said, it’s not completely unheard of for a person to start manifesting symptoms later in life. It’s also possible that, if Pamela did have one of those illnesses, she had been dealing with symptoms for a lot longer than is supposed. I was diagnosed with severe depression at 23; two years later, my doctor changed his mind and decided I was actually bipolar. In fact, I’d been dealing with symptoms since I was a child and just did a good job of hiding it.

In any case, Pamela must obviously be considered an at-risk missing person. There were some leads placing her in Ohio after she disappeared, but I haven’t found a whole lot of news about this. The most recent article I could find is two years old.

Make-a-List Monday: Roadside stuff

This list is for MPs whose belongings — such as identification, purse, cell phone, etc. — turned up alongside the road after they disappeared. (I didn’t count cars though.) I actually did a list of this recently, but just for cell phones; I decided to expand on it.

This seems to me like a pretty good indication of foul play: either the MP was forcibly abducted from the roadside and dropped the items during the struggle, or whoever harmed them tossed the incriminating things out their car window. I mean, no one just voluntarily leaves their wallet or their phone in such a place in an ordinary situation.

The part of Ohio where I’m from used to be pretty much all swamp. They drained the swamps by digging ditches. There are ditches pretty much everywhere, on both sides of the road. They fill with stagnant water sometimes, or the grass in them grows knee-high. If someone threw something out the window, there’s a good chance that it wouldn’t get found for months or years, or maybe never.

  1. Danielle Tamara Brown
  2. Tara Leigh Calico
  3. Christopher Dale Gregory
  4. Jamie Rochelle Grisim
  5. Sierra Mae Lamar
  6. Mary Georgine Lang
  7. Anna Marie Molina
  8. Trung Quang Ngo
  9. Starr Maurie Hill
  10. Lucinda Lynn Schaefer
  11. James Leon Throneberry
  12. Paula Anne Worcester