Make-a-List Monday: State Capitals #10

The last of the state capitals lists. See the previous 9:

Alabama — California
Colorado — Georgia
Hawaii — Iowa
Kansas — Maryland
Massachusetts — Missouri
Montana — New Jersey
New Mexico — Ohio
Oklahoma — South Carolina
South Dakota — Vermont

Richmond, Virginia

  1. Jamal Abdul’Faruq
  2. William Adkins
  3. Alex Felipe Bolanos-Martinez
  4. Doris Ann Brown
  5. Benjamin Lloyd Coffey
  6. Randall William Collins
  7. Melanie A. Davis
  8. William Keith Dean Jr.
  9. Jonathan Samuel Dorey
  10. Lander Stanhope Freeman
  11. Annie Doris Horne
  12. Hazel Alice Klug
  13. Laverne Denise Lewis
  14. Robert Sidney Long
  15. Benjamin Andrew Lott
  16. Richard William Miller Jr.
  17. Patricia Ann Schmidt
  18. Joseph Slaughter
  19. Elizabeth Ann Thomas
  20. Jaisle Elizabeth Thomas
  21. Stephanie Collette Wallace
  22. Brittany Renee Williams
  23. Jimmy Lewis Williams III

Olympia, Washington

  1. David Reuben Boniske
  2. Michelle Renee Maitland
  3. Donna Gail Manson
  4. Lynenne Lavette O’Neill
  5. Shantina Marie Smiley

Charleston, West Virginia

  1. Bobby Eugene Adams
  2. Robert L. Shaffer
  3. Starina Marie Woods

Madison, Wisconsin

  1. Patricia Gail Arnold
  2. Robert Lewis Christian
  3. John Edward Christoph’
  4. Danius W. Johnson
  5. Wook Kim
  6. Amos Kale Mortier
  7. Rita R. Rahn
  8. Jeanette Louise Zapata

Cheyenne, Wyoming

  1. Casey Franklin Harper

That’s all, folks.

Select It Sunday: Elizabeth Acton

Susan P. asked me to re-share Elizabeth Jean Acton‘s casefile on the Charley Project Facebook page. I thought I’d do one better and do a Select It Sunday about her.

Unfortunately I really don’t know anything about Elizabeth’s disappearance. The 41-year-old woman was last seen in Montross, Virginia on August 24, 1994. That’s all I know. Wikipedia says that Montross is the county seat of Westmoreland County, but it’s really tiny; the population was 315 people in the last census. It’s in northeastern Virginia, right near the coast.

If anyone can give me some more information about Elizabeth Acton’s case I’d be most grateful.

MP of the week: Edward “Ashton” Stubbs

This week’s featured missing person is Edward Ashton Stubbs, who goes by his middle name. He was less than a week shy of his 16th birthday when he walked away from his summer job in Dickinson, North Dakota and vanished on June 17, 2013.

Most agencies classify Ashton as a runaway. His family was quoted as saying he had health issues. I can’t figure out what those issues were, but I’m wondering if they were mental health issues rather than physical, since he was working a construction job and laying drywall. But I don’t know.

If Ashton is still alive, and I hope he is, he’d be 20 years old by now.

Make-a-List Monday: Female veterans

This CNN article says women comprise only 14.5% of the American armed forces overall. I’ve had several relatives serve in the military, but only one woman: my niece, who is in the Air Force and stationed in Minot, North Dakota right now. (Hi, Ali!) I thought I’d do a list of female veterans from the Charley Project.

  1. Angela Abbrederis
  2. Gloria Jean Baird
  3. Hattie Gertrude Brown
  4. Susan Carroll Cassell
  5. Regina Renee Cox
  6. Nonnie Ann Dotson
  7. Selena Marie Edon
  8. Gina Marie Ellison
  9. Margaret I. Haddican-McEnroe
  10. Lisa Michelle Hatchell
  11. Marina Miquelle Kissinger
  12. Elaine Faye Lehtinen
  13. Bonnie Rae Kelly
  14. Sharon Ann Martin
  15. Sheila Kathleen McBroom
  16. Frances Morales
  17. Debby Lynn Oberg
  18. Alma Louise O’Con
  19. Beth Ann Ricketts
  20. Shirley Gibbs Russell
  21. Veyda Maria Sellers
  22. Herlinda Ann Soto
  23. Virginia Alice Welch

Flashback Friday: Beatrice Calderon

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Beatrice Susan Calderon, last seen in San Jose, California on August 17, 1971. She was 33 years old at the time of her disappearance and would be 79 today if she’s still alive.

Unfortunately, I know doodly squat about the circumstances of her case.

Let’s Talk About It: William and Margaret Patterson

Middle-aged married couple William Durrell Patterson, 52, and Margaret M. Patterson, 42, vanished from El Paso, Texas on March 5, 1957. They were last seen by a neighbor who dropped by with some Girl Scout cookies. Margaret looked upset at the time and William didn’t seem to want company. That night there was unspecified “unusual activity” observed at the Patterson home. The next day they were gone, and it looked like they had left in a hurry.

William in particular seems to have been involved in some kind of sketchy things. His own father said he “made his living doing sleight-of-hand tricks” and he had always expected the Pattersons to disappear eventually.

There are some indications that they left of their own accord, the appearance of the house nonwithstanding. Let’s break it down:

  • On March 15, the Pattersons’ accountant got a telegram with instructions on how to manage their business in their absence. HOWEVER, the telegram was signed “W.H. Patterson” and not “W.D. Patterson.” The obvious explanations I can think of are (1) William did not really send that telegram or (2) William did send the telegram but messed up his initials on purpose as a duress signal.
  • William’s mistress, who lived in Juarez, said she saw him in the early morning hours of March 6 (the day after he and Margaret were seen in El Paso) and he told her he had important things to tell her and “when they come for me, I’ll have to go in a hurry.” HOWEVER, she later recanted this statement. What I’m wondering is: if William had important things to tell her, why not just tell her right then, since they were together and all?
  • The couple’s business associates went around telling everyone they were on an extended vacation. No word as to where they were getting this information, but as a result they weren’t reported missing for five months.
  • The Pattersons’ lawyer eventually got a letter, supposedly from William, postmarked May 29. It said they were getting out of dodge and would not be returning, and instructing that their property should be divided up. HOWEVER, the selection of heirs was…curious, to say the least, and handwriting experts were not sure that William had actually signed the letter, and for several legal reasons (starting with the fact that Margaret co-owned the couple’s photography business), it had no actual value as a will.

In 1984, a witness went to the police and said he had been hired to clean the Pattersons’ home after they disappeared and he saw blood in the garage, a piece of human scalp stuck to William’s boat propeller, and someone carrying away bloodstained sheets. The witness was an illegal immigrant and he said he didn’t go to the police at the time because he was afraid he’d be deported. I’ve got no idea if there’s any evidence to back up his statement. I’ve watched Forensic Files; I know they have all sorts of gizmos and experts in all kinds of obscure fields of crime scene analysis and it seems like if the house had still been there, they might have found something.

For what it’s worth, Margaret was completely estranged from her family. They hadn’t heard from her in 20 years and they assumed she was dead, which is an odd assumption if you ask me. She was a young healthy woman and she doesn’t appear to have vanished out of their lives into thin air; she became estranged from them because they disapproved of her marriage to William. So why would they assume she was dead?

Now, it’s been 60 years, and both of the Pattersons would be over 100 years old by now, so it’s a safe bet to assume they’re not alive anymore. What I would like to know is: do y’all think they were alive after 1957?

Let’s talk about it.