Flashback Friday: Dermot Kelly

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Dermot Faulkner Kelly, who disappeared from Oglesby, Illinois on January 30, 1972, at the age of sixteen. The circumstances of his case make it unclear whether he died in a drowning accident/suicide or, perhaps, left of his own accord to make a new life elsewhere. If he did run away he didn’t take anything with him, and there hasn’t been any sign of him since 1972.

MP of the week: Mary Alexie

This week’s featured missing person is Mary Anne Alexie, an Alaskan Native woman who disappeared from Anchorage on October 10, 2012. Mary had left her home in Fairbanks and traveled to Anchorage to enroll in college, but missed the first day’s classes. In the early morning hours she called her friends and she was in a VERY vulnerable position at the time: drunk, disoriented, and lost in a dangerous city. And that was the last sign of her, from that day to this.

It’s a safe bet that something terrible happened to her.

Make-a-List Monday: State Capitals #9

See the previous lists:

Pierre, South Dakota

  1. Linda Marie Law

Nashville, Tennessee

  1. Nichole R. Burgess
  2. Oscar Alexander Campos
  3. Ricky Lee Franks
  4. Charles Hall III
  5. Donald Lewis Johnson
  6. Mayme H. Johnson
  7. Lakisha Danielle Jones
  8. Roger Kay Liles
  9. Richard Allen Locke Jr.
  10. Janet Gail Levine March
  11. Latisha Yvonne Milliken
  12. Pamela Jean Mitchell
  13. Debra A. Murr
  14. George Owens
  15. Steven Daniel Paul
  16. Veda Lou Powers
  17. Marcus T. Rutledge
  18. Alice Mae Sullivan
  19. Linda Carol Taylor
  20. Tabitha Danielle Tuders
  21. Laresha Deana Walker
  22. Jason Baker Wilson
  23. Lee Pasquelle Woodard
  24. Rodney Darnell Woodard
  25. Jennifer Lynn Wyant

Austin, Texas

  1. Matthew Cameron Barrows
  2. Jennifer Joyce Barton
  3. Michael J. Chouinard
  4. Robert Curtis Coe
  5. Shirley Dean Cowan
  6. David Harold Dilloway
  7. Daniel Fogg
  8. Irene Theresa Garcia
  9. Shawnta Denise Garrett
  10. Julie Ann Gonzalez
  11. John Franklin Gregory
  12. Jason Augustus Hill
  13. Joyanne Houk
  14. Sharon Zelinski McCully
  15. Mary McFadyen
  16. Gracie Nash
  17. Roxanne Elizabeth Paltauf
  18. Paresh Patel
  19. Richard Barnett Rinehart
  20. Debra Kay Stewart
  21. Patti Gail Swinburne
  22. Adan Andrada Velasco
  23. Adrian Demont Washington
  24. Tanisha Lorraine Watkins

Salt Lake City, Utah

  1. Lakhbir Banwait
  2. Acacia Patience Bishop
  3. John Lowain Casper
  4. Curtis Crosby
  5. Dale Duane Brown
  6. Piotr Drabik
  7. Debra Lee Frost
  8. David Mathew Jaramillo
  9. Sandra Haymes Matott
  10. William McBride III
  11. Jeffrey Dale Nichols
  12. Robert Michael Patton
  13. Douglas Perry Plummer
  14. Lloyd Michael Reese
  15. Jason Jack Simmons Jr.
  16. Dennis Smith
  17. Sheree L. Warren
  18. Aletha Jo Williams

Montpelier, Vermont

  1. Audrey Groat

Select It Sunday: Leon Moncer

This week’s Select It Sunday case was chosen by Julie W.: it’s her father, Leon Arthur Moncer, who disappeared from Bellaire, Ohio at the age of 21. It was February 18, 1982 — 35 years ago yesterday.

Leon’s case has a number of odd aspects to it — some indications of foul play, but also indications that he may have just left on his own. He has been declared legally dead, but his family still hopes for answers.

(And can I have some more Select It Sunday suggestions? I’m running dry.)

Flashback Friday: Eva West

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Eva Susan West, a 28-year-old who disappeared from Oklahoma City on June 14, 1985. After her disappearance made the news, Eva’s mom got a call from someone saying she was all right, but this was never confirmed and her mom never actually spoke to the caller. The police don’t think Eva is all right, and they think drugs could be a factor.

Let’s talk about it: Four patients in the same medical practice

Between 1996 and 1997 four people, all of them in roughly the same age group, disappeared from the Los Angeles area: Robert Vincent Black, 64, on March 12, 1996; Patricia Laxer, 63, on August 11, 1997; Goldie A. Swanger, 75, on August 29, 1997; Richard Dean Davison, 70, on October 29, 1997. Mysteriously, not only were all four of these individuals patients of the same doctor (I never found out anything about him), but they all supposedly disappeared while going either to or from appointments with him.

The first answer that strikes me is “serial killer connected with the medical practice,” but what little I knew about the cases didn’t seem to indicate foul play; in fact the police not only suggested they were alive, but that each “may be a patient in a hospital or nursing home.”

In 2004, I found out Goldie Swanger’s case had been resolved, but I did not learn her fate at the time, whether she’d been found dead, or what. I blogged about this in 2011, and in 2014 a commenter, claiming to be Swanger’s biological son, left a comment on that blog entry. I quote from it below. He, his daughter Andria and another of Goldie’s granddaughters traveled to Los Angeles in 2000 or 2001 and

did a little investigation, got medical records from a doctor that Goldie was seeing before she became missing. That doctor told me that she saw him about once a month and then just never showed up and that he wondered what became of her! We found out where she was last at, alive, during her being “missing”. I believe it was a nursing home or something to that effect. I believe the government department that we today call the SRS had something to hide as they threw roadblocks in our search of Goldie.

I’m not sure what he means by SRS. Google turned up “special retirement supplement” which doesn’t make a lot of sense, and “supported residential services” which does, but supported residential services isn’t an American government department, only a service provided by the state government in Victoria, AUSTRALIA. My guess is he meant something similar to supported residential services that the U.S. or California government provide, but got the acronym wrong. Anyway, on with what Goldie Swanger’s son said:

It seems strange that as soon as my wife and I determined that her last name was Swanger and informed the SRS we knew her last name, the “SRS” had one hissy fit, and we determined that Goldie was still alive! But when we got to California she had passed away! Now that is strange! We found out where she lived previous to this facility and saw the place (apartment) and met and talked with a person who knew Goldie (an apartment neighbor). The administrator of the facility she was last at clammed up when we started to question the circumstance as to why Goldie was at this facility. Andria talked with a person who worked in that facility and knew Goldie as a patient(?). Andria has the info on this place. Goldie’s biological family believe that what we discovered may possibly be something to do with medicare fraud. The other missing persons in that area may just have been admitted to that same facility. We don’t know. We couldn’t find out.

The plot thickens indeed. This is most peculiar. I’d love to learn more about this case — some questions that come to mind are who was this doctor, what was his speciality, is he still practicing, what the MPs were seeing him for, and what were their general states of physical/mental health at the time they went missing? The facility administrator may have “clammed up” because there was something sketchy going on, but it could have been for confidentiality reasons (HIPAA).

I suppose it’s possible the other three could be still alive, particularly if they’re in a reasonably good care facility. (Key words being “possible” and “reasonably good”.) By now Black would be 85, Davis would be 89, and Laxer would be 83. But I wonder if anyone is even looking for them by now. If I was looking to imprison some people in a care facility against their will for the purposes of committing medical assistance fraud, I’d be targeting people with no living relatives, or at least no close relatives, and few ties to their community — people who would be easily missed.

So what happened to these people? Let’s talk about it.

MP of the week: Alexis Dillard

This week’s featured missing person is Alexis Dillard, who is male. A KU senior, he vanished on December 11, 1992, after a night out drinking with his fraternity brothers in North Lawrence, Kansas. There’s a theory that he drowned in the Kansas River, possibly while trying to swim across. He was 22.

And yes, I’m aware that suspect Pedro Hernandez was convicted of Etan Patz’s murder and I’m aware I have to re-write his entire casefile. That’ll be my task for tomorrow.