Articles about other kids in the wake of Jayme’s recovery

As often happens when a high-profile missing child is found, especially when they’re found safe, news agencies are dusting off their local missing kid cases and being all like, “Hey, you know how Jayme Closs was found? Here’s some kids missing in YOUR area and their parents hope they’ll get found too.” So far we’ve got:

I highly doubt Adji or Diana is alive. Adji is a special needs child and if he was abducted, I don’t think the abductor could have kept him long without attracting some attention. As for Diana, a suspect has been charged with her murder.

Native American Heritage Month: Damon Boyd

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Damon Lee Boyd, a 29-year-old Ojibwe man who disappeared from Itasca County in northern Minnesota on May 27, 2014.

Boyd has both an alcohol problem and some mental illness issues, and he’s been in several treatment centers in the past. He was last seen after “leaving” a residential facility in Polk County, Minnesota. I don’t know whether he was properly discharged from that facility, or absconded.

According to the Facebook page set up for him, he may have been in the Fargo, North Dakota area after his disappearance.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Keyla Contreras

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Keyla Contreras, a biracial Hispanic and African-American eighteen-year-old who disappeared from Manhattan on January 13, 2012.

Keyla’s case is concerning because she’s deaf and mute — meaning she can’t speak intelligibly and only communicates with sign language. Obviously that makes her extremely vulnerable. She left her home in the Spanish Harlem area at 7:00 a.m., perhaps to go to work or school, and vanished.

Unfortunately I know very little about her disappearance. Even the Whereabouts Still Unknown blog, known for its wonderful research, couldn’t find much on her.

MP of the week: Jessie Barnes

This week’s featured missing person is Jessie Barnes, a 28-year-old mentally disabled woman who disappeared from West Point, Mississippi, a small town in the northeast part of the state, on July 7, 2000.

Although she had mental challenges, Jessie was relatively high-functioning and would sometimes “drop out of sight for a few days.” Her family got concerned and reported her missing after ten days because her grandma had died and she didn’t show up for the funeral.

I think if she is alive (and this seems unlikely) she may be on the streets somewhere. She has a daughter, and if still alive she would be 46 years old today.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: William Gu

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is William Gu, a 22-year-old City University of New York student who disappeared from Brooklyn on March 7, 2013. I’m not sure of his ancestry but Wikipedia says his surname is either Chinese or Korean.

William was supposed to meet a friend on Staten Island, but never showed up, and his car was found wrecked and abandoned in Somerset, New Jersey. His disappearance is especially worrying because William had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) which causes “depression, paranoia, minor hallucinations and psychotic behaviors.”

William’s disappearance reminds me a lot of the disappearance of Sean Sidi, another young Asian man with a TBI who disappeared just two and a half months later, albeit on the opposite coast.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Le Tung Dinh

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Le Tung Dinh, a 38-year-old man of Vietnamese descent who was last seen standing in the doorway of his family’s apartment in San Diego, California on February 4, 1996.

Dinh was brain-damaged and mentally disabled, and couldn’t take care of himself, so he still lived with his parents. He apparently wandered away when his mom left him alone for a few minutes.

I wish I knew more about this case; I couldn’t find any articles about it in the newspaper archives. Dinh’s parents, who spoke only Vietnamese, are no longer in contact with the police, and NamUs says there’s no DNA available.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Wendy Kimura

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Wendy M. Kimura, a 28-year-old woman who disappeared from Cary, Illinois on May 21, 1999. I don’t know for sure but I think she’s of Japanese descent; Kimura is a Japanese surname.

Wendy was a Chicago resident who took the train to Cary on May 20, and spent the night with a friend. She was last seen walking along Route 14 the next day.

There isn’t a whole lot out there about the circumstances of her disappearance, but it’s worth noting that she has both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. In June 2013, fourteen years after her disappearance, the cops searched the Fox River for her, but didn’t find anything.