I think I’m getting back in the saddle

The past week has been a bit unproductive as I was afflicted with what was either a severe cold or severe allergies, not sure which. I was pretty miserable with coughing and general yuckiness and couldn’t get much done.

In the meantime, people have disappeared, people have been found (including Delilah Dawn Hopkins, finally identified after being missing almost twenty years), the wheel turns.

The good news is that, per FBI data, the rate of missing persons and missing kids in particular is at its lowest since 1990. It’s the start of a lovely summer, people. Let your kids play outside, provided the pollen count’s down.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Howard Takanaka

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Howard Shizue Takanaka Jr., a 26-year-old Army veteran who disappeared from Superior, Wisconsin sometime in January 1984.

The circumstances of his disappearance are vague; even the exact date his unknown. However, there’s no reason to think he’s not still alive today …somewhere.

Three dollars

Hey guys, the Charley Project is asking you for something: three dollars.

For three dollars a month, less than the price of a McDonald’s milkshake, you can help maintain one of the largest, most detailed missing persons databases online, a major tool for getting the information out there about cold cases.

If everyone who viewed the Charley Project on a daily basis donated just three dollars each month, that would be enough that the administrator could keep it as a full-time job and not have to cut back on missing persons work.

In exchange, this important tool can still be used by hundreds of thousands of people around the world, including law enforcement, journalists, podcasters, missing persons’ families, bloggers, amateur sleuths, and more.

If you can only afford to give two dollars or one dollar, that’s fine. If you can give more, terrific—any amount is appreciated.

You can use PayPal to donate to administrator@charleyproject.org. If you go to any Charley Project casefile, the PayPal button is at the top. Type in the amount, check the box that says “make this a monthly donation” and follow the steps.

It’s very easy and very, very much appreciated.

Next week is full up

Just a word of warning: I’m going to be extremely busy all of next week and I don’t think I’ll be getting much of anything done on the website. I’ve mentioned before about a certain project I’m working on. I’ll be working on that project all next week. I can’t say anything more about it in public at this time.

And next weekend, of course, I’m going to Wisconsin. It will take pretty much an entire day just to get there. I’ll be leaving Friday. The event is Saturday, and I’m going to spend Saturday night in Green Bay and then return home on Sunday.

Going to 5th Annual Wisconsin Missing Persons Awareness Event in April

So in two weeks I will be attending the fifth annual missing persons awareness event in Green Bay, Wisconsin. I went to the first, second, and fourth ones.

wisconsinevent

This year, I will not have to stay in l’Hotel a la Sketchy or an Airbnb; due to the sponsorship of a certain person who shall remain anonymous for the moment, I will be staying in a respectable establishment for once.

I should have a blast. I always do.

MP of the week: Debra Cole

This week’s featured missing person is Debra Jean Cole, a twelve-year-old girl who disappeared from Lebanon, Indiana on August 29, 1981.

They’re pretty sure Debra was killed by her mother’s live-in boyfriend, who definitely killed Debra’s sister Frances in 1983. Unfortunately, the boyfriend was never prosecuted in either case. He died in 1989, and Debra’s body has never been found.

Black History Month: Kimberly and Sarah Boyd and Linda McCord

In honor of Black History Month I’m profiling one African-American MP every day on this blog for the month of February. Today’s case is actually three disappearances: 32-year-old Sarah W. Boyd, her friend, 31-year-old Linda McCord, and Sarah’s daughter, two-year-old Kimberly Janis Boyd, who disappeared somewhere between Dorchester County and Orangeburg County, South Carolina on April 3, 1987.

They had gone to a gospel concert and were last seen driving back home. They never arrived and their car was found abandoned in Dorchester County on April 5.

I haven’t been able to find a whole lot on this case. It seems like it should have gotten SOME media attention; I mean, three people gone missing at once, and Kimberly was just adorable, a little doll. It’s entirely possible there was significant attention and I just haven’t found the news yet; this was thirty years ago, after all.

It sounds like the three of them may have been harmed by someone they stopped to help. If evidence was properly preserved and could be analyzed with modern forensic techniques, the case could be very solvable.