Some behind-the-scenes updates

Yeah, I’m sorry I’ve been kind of absent this month so far. I think I might have mentioned I’m taking some different medicine, cause my old medicine made me gain 40 pounds. This new medicine seems to work, as far as moods go, and I don’t think I’ve gained any more weight, but it’s interfering with my sleeping a lot. It seems like I can’t sleep more than four hours at a time. And four hours plus four hours does not eight hours make. I’ve been really tired and draggy and unable to accomplish much even when I’m awake.

Anyway, I am getting some stuff done today. I have:

Middle Name and Date of Birth Added

  1. Linda Lou Bean
  2. Nanette Evette Thomas
  3. Jacob Lewis Tipton

Date of Birth Added

  1. John Howard Friebely
  2. Adrian Genti Gokaj
  3. Pamela Diane Ingle
  4. Napoleon M. Ray
  5. Joe Saxton
  6. Chad Allen Scudder
  7. Lori Dee Wilson

Pictures Added

  1. David Antonio Cambray
  2. Maria Ann Monrean
  3. Kathy Pereira

AP Updated

  1. Amanda Alexandra Adlai
  2. Brittney Ann Beers
  3. David Michael Borer
  4. Bryan Keith Fisher
  5. Kyron Richard Horman
  6. Ayesha Faheem Khan
  7. Fatima Faheem Khan
  8. Sindy Jazmin Perez-Aguilar
  9. Jasmine Anne Marie Sajedi
  10. Stevey Howard Sommerville
  11. Vivian Aileen Trout
  12. Anna Christian Waters
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MP of the week: Wilson Happy

I am sorry I did not post this yesterday. I have been extremely sleep-deprived lately and after my therapy appointment I went home and collapsed. Didn’t wake up until well after Michael got home.

Anyway, Wilson Happy is the new missing person of the week. An elderly Navajo man, he disappeared from Farmington, New Mexico on June 4, 2008 and I think the circumstances are suspicious: he went to the bank, withdrew $2,000, and then sat out in a car (not his, he didn’t have one) in the parking lot, looking nervous. And was never seen again. I can’t help but wonder if he was being robbed.

Flashback Friday: Donald Ewalt

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Donald Cary Ewalt, missing from El Centro, California on October 4, 1979 — 38 years ago this past Sunday. He was last seen in the company of three males and foul play is suspected in his disappearance. Ewalt was 22 at the time and would be 60 today.

For some reason the Texas Department of Public Safety is assisting. Shrug.

I checked for him in the Newspapers.com archives and found an article from 1972 in the Opelousas Daily World, a Louisiana paper, about a 15-year-old by that name. My Donald would have been that age in 1972. The Louisiana Donald had run away from home and gotten a job at Grand Canyon National Park, but after several weeks the park authorities got suspicious and called the cops, who called his parents, who sent him the bus fare to come back home.

Flashback Friday: Steven Kirchhoff

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Steven Dick Kirchhoff, who disappeared from Waterloo, Iowa on January 24, 1978. He was 22 years old. Foul play is strongly suspected in his case: Kirchhoff was a known drug dealer, he was allegedly carrying $8k in cash on the day of his disappearance, and a neighbor heard bumping noises and someone crying out “Oh God, don’t do this to me!”

He may have been killed by Richard Forsyth, who himself disappeared from Waterloo in October 1979. It’s possible that Forsyth met with foul play also, or he may have hopped the border into Canada.

Flashback Friday: David Sampson

This week’s Flashback Friday case is David Robert Sampson, a 21-year-old student at the University of Washington who disappeared from Seattle on March 1, 1977. I don’t know his major, but he was interested in “botany, hiking and environmental issues,” so perhaps it was something like biology.

Indications are Sampson left of his own accord; he took several possessions, including survival gear, a Bible and other religious materials, but no ID or cash. He may have joined some kind of cult; his case reminds me a bit of Robert Spurlock‘s. (I ought to do a Make-a-List Monday of cases where the MP is thought to have joined a cult.) It’s worth noting that Sampson disappeared at the tail end of the hippie era, and it sounds like he might have found that lifestyle agreeable.

But if he did join a cult, where has he been since 1977? Canada maybe? But if he left the country, how’d he cross the border without any identification?

I was able to get Sampson’s date of birth today from the Washington State Missing Person Search database. The anonymous author of the excellent Whereabouts Still Unknown blog has an entry for him as well. I couldn’t find anything about his disappearance in the newspaper archives, though, which isn’t surprising giving it was 1977 and he was a college student and a man at that. That profile of missing person is rarely covered in the news even today.

If he is still alive, and he may very well be, David Sampson would be 62 today. There’s a good chance his parents would be dead by now, but perhaps he has siblings or cousins who are still hoping for resolution in his case.

Strike that, reverse it: murder-without-a-body cases

It has been brought to my attention that Walter Shannon Stevenson, whose case I resolved yesterday, has not been found after all. This article, from which I got the original information, has issued a retraction. A suspect, Jeffrey May, has been charged with his murder, but Walter’s case is currently a no-body homicide.

I hope the body turns up soon. In the meantime, I’ll remove the resolved notice and put up Walter’s casefile again with the next update (probably today).

And speaking of murder-without-a-body cases, it looks like the only indicted suspect in Katherine and Sheila Lyon‘s 1975 disappearances is about to plead guilty. Some articles:

This isn’t the end of the story — there’s another suspect who is also believed to have been involved — but it might be the beginning of the end.

As of this writing, the Corpus Delicti section of Charley — my three lists of murder-without-a-body cases currently on the website — has approximately 615 names. (I saw “approximately” because a few names are on more than one list due to multiple defendants and multiple outcomes. I wish I could find the outcomes for more of those cases on List Three, which surely must have been resolved by now.)

For more details about murder-without-a-body cases, I highly recommend you check out Tad DiBiase’s website (particularly this PDF) and book.

MP of the week: Shaun Thornhill

This week’s featured missing person is Shaun Thornhill, who was last seen in St. Francisville, Louisiana on January 23, 2012. Thornhill had come to town looking for work, but got arrested for public intoxication and spent the night of January 20/21 in jail. He bonded out the next day and stayed in a local hotel for the next two days and possibly a third; they’re not sure. On January 23, his pickup truck was found abandoned in Adams County, Mississippi with all his stuff inside.

I can’t say what happened to Shaun Thornhill, of course, but I don’t think it was anything good. I tend to suspect that anyone who left behind all their belongings, particularly their car, has probably come into some trouble. If he wanted to leave on his own he would have needed transportation to wherever he was going.