MP of the week (a day late, sorry): Lavorn Frye

This week’s featured missing person is Lavorn Frye, a twenty-year-old man who disappeared from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 30, 1991. Unfortunately, I don’t have anything more to report on his case.

I have another Executed Today entry that ran today: Sheyna Gram and the Jews of Preiļi. Preiļi being a small Latvian town whose Jewish population was almost entirely wiped out on this day in 1941. Sheyna Gram was a sixteen-year-old girl who kept a diary from the day of the German invasion of the Soviet Union until her death.

Unfortunately I’m really not doing very well at the moment. The last week or so has kicked my butt and I’m barely functioning. I’m sorry.

Make-a-List Monday: The Gospels

Cody N. suggested I do a Make-a-List Monday for people named Matthew, Mark, Luke or John — that four Gospels in the New Testament. I actually did a list of people named some form of John last fall. Today’s list is for people named John (and ONLY John, not Jonathan or Evan or Sean or suchlike) who have been added since then, and for people named Matthew, Mark or Luke (first names only, variants not included).

JOHN

  1. John Michael Baham Jr.
  2. John Peter Fox
  3. John Howard Friebely
  4. John P. Suggs
  5. John Curtis Tensley
  6. John Graham Thompson
  7. John William Wingler Sr.

LUKE

  1. Luke Robinson
  2. Luke Adam Sanburg
  3. Luke David Stout
  4. Luke Townsend
  5. Luke Aaron Tredway

MARK

  1. Mark Wayne Adamson
  2. Mark Addison
  3. Mark Lindsey Bachelder
  4. Mark Anthony Berumen
  5. Mark Bonner
  6. Mark Lawrence Bosworth
  7. Mark Travis Burkett Jr.
  8. Mark Kamaki Cajski
  9. Mark Twain Celestine
  10. Mark Skinner Clarke
  11. Mark Alan Cohen
  12. Mark Allen Collman
  13. Mark Anthony Cook
  14. Mark William Cowardin
  15. Mark Norman Dantche
  16. Mark Randall Davis
  17. Mark Anthony Degner
  18. Mark Lee Doose
  19. Mark Jeffrey Dribin
  20. Mark Duane Folz
  21. Mark Allen Garnett
  22. Mark Thomas Gibson
  23. Mark Joseph Himebaugh
  24. Mark R. Hudson
  25. Mark Allen Husk
  26. Mark Douglas Jackson
  27. Mark Randall Johnson
  28. Mark William Kotlarz
  29. Mark Stephen Lemieux
  30. Mark Steven Martin
  31. Mark R. Marvin
  32. Mark Arthur Maty
  33. Mark Allen Merritt
  34. Mark Allen Miller
  35. Mark Allan Nichter
  36. Mark Julian Oldbury Jr.
  37. Mark A. Peal
  38. Mark Wade Potts
  39. Mark Donald Ramin
  40. Mark William Seelman
  41. Mark Lane Smith
  42. Mark Allen Thompson
  43. Mark D. Tomich
  44. Mark Raymond Tourney
  45. Mark Andrew Wilborne
  46. Mark Wendell Wilson
  47. Mark Eugene Yoli
  48. Mark David Zeichner

MATTHEW

  1. Matthew Glen Anderson
  2. Matthew Cameron Barrows
  3. Matthew Colter
  4. Matthew Wade Crocker
  5. Matthew Jonathan Curtis
  6. Matthew John Ferris
  7. Matthew Kirby Gale Jr.
  8. Matthew Paul Garnes
  9. Matthew Scott Hulse
  10. Matthew Ellis Keith
  11. Matthew Stephen McCaskey
  12. Matthew Alan Mullaney
  13. Matthew Nolan
  14. Matthew Jacob Salazar
  15. Matthew Vincent Sueper
  16. Matthew Chase Whitmer
  17. Matthew Stephen Wood

Maybe I should phone this in on Monday

Earlier this month I mentioned on this blog a case of a local guy who disappeared, Kori Glossett, and how I went to school with Michael and Michelle Glossett, presumably relatives of Kori. Kori himself went to the same school but he was many grades below me and I’m not sure we ever met.

In my blog entry I’d said I had seen Michelle in a gas station awhile back. She was working there. Yesterday evening I was at the same gas station and, as I’d like to satisfy my curiosity as to what the Glossett twins’ familial relation is to Kori and maybe get more details about his disappearance, I asked the guy behind the counter if Michelle still worked there. Nope, he said.

“Oh,” I said. “Oh well. I run a missing persons database, you see. There’s a guy named Kori Glossett missing from around here and I figure Michelle must be related to him and I was going to ask her about it, see if she could tell me something I could put on my site. I don’t know a lot about his case.”

“Kori?” the gas station guy said, as if in surprise. He looked to be about 25 or so, about Kori’s age. “That ***hole? He’s STILL missing?”

“Yup,” said. “For over a year now.”

I was a bit surprised he was using that kind of language, given how he was an employee and I was a customer and we didn’t know each each other. I mean, I didn’t mind but I bet his boss would have had something to say about it.

“He’s not REALLY missing, you know,” the guy said. “He’s buried out in the woods.”

“Hmm,” I said noncommittally. I know there had been multiple search warrants executed on private properties, and digs on said properties for Kory’s body. You don’t really need to read between the lines to realize the cops think he’s dead.

“A LOT of people wanted Kori dead,” Gas Station Guy said. “This is what happens to scumbags, especially when they get into drugs.” He just kinda shrugged and smirked at me as he said that.

I gave him one of the Charley Project business cards. Maybe he will give it to Michelle or Michael or someone else in the family, and they’ll contact me.

But what I’m thinking is maybe I should call LE about this.

Chances are this guy knows nothing in particular about Kori’s case and is just repeating rumors he’s heard. Maybe LE has spoken to him already. But suppose he DOES actually know something and suppose the cops HAVEN’T interviewed him or heard of him? Maybe he even knows the person or persons responsible for Kori’s disappearance. Anything’s possible.

I didn’t catch the guy’s name or anything but it should be easy for the cops to learn his identity. Only two people were working in the gas station when I walked in yesterday.

So what’ll y’all think?

[EDIT: Yeah, like ten minutes after writing this I decided to call it in right then and there even if it was Saturday. The man who answered the phone listened politely, wrote down what I said, and promised to pass the info on to the detectives, plus my name and phone number for if they need to talk to me.

My mom is worried because this guy has my Charley Project business card and I used my credit card to buy snacks at the gas station so he’s got that info too. What if the police come to talk to him and he gets mad about it, she says. Well, the credit card billing address is my dad’s apartment, not my own house. He could harass me online, I suppose, but I doubt he will, and even if I did, I’ve certainly dealt with that before. He could steal my credit card info and buy stuff with it just to give me a hard time, but if someone does that within the next few days or weeks, I will tell the credit card company to look at him as a possible suspect in the theft.

I doubt anything will come of this at all but I’ve done my bit. It’s all you can do.]

MP of the week: Kelson Roby

This week’s featured missing person is Kelson Ryanell “Ryan” Roby, who disappeared on June 15, 1990 at the age of 31. The Texas Department of Public Safety page for him is a bit unclear: it says he’s missing from New York, but that he was last seen in Irving, Dallas County, Texas.

The Newspapers.com archive yielded no articles about Roby’s disappearance, but I did found some articles from 1979 that mentioned a Kelson Roby who matches the details of the missing man. The Kelson Roby in the articles transferred to the University of Northern Iowa from Anoka-Ramsey Community College in Minnesota and played on the UNI football team. The articles describe the UNI player as a college junior and 6’1 tall. The Kelson Roby on the Charley Project would have been 20 years old in 1979 (that is, about the age to be a junior in college) and his listed height is 6’2, well within the margin of error.

I don’t know for sure but I think it’s entirely likely that they’re the same person in spite of the distance. Kelson Roby isn’t the world’s most common name, after all.

I wish I knew more about Roby’s case. Foul play is suspected but I don’t know why. I do think it’s worth noting that he was wearing a pricey Rolex — gold and platinum with a diamond bezel — as well as a diamond ring. I’m assuming those things have serial numbers or something and are traceable.

This has literally never happened before

You know I’ve really been on a roll lately with updates. I posted 20 for today just a few minutes after midnight, went to bed, woke up in the early morning hours and now I’ve started on tomorrow’s updates already.

Anyway, I wanted to bring up a case I’m going to add tomorrow: Kori Glossett, missing from Ohio since late June or early July 2016. I really don’t know much in the way of details yet because I haven’t actually started researching writing the case yet, but things are kind of contradictory — one source I’ve seen gives the place as Van Wert, Ohio and the date as “approximately” July 1, and the other other source says it was Middle Point, Ohio and the date was June 24.

Anyway, the reason I’m writing about Kori is I’m 95% certain I went to school with close relatives of his.

A set of twins named Michael and Michelle Glossett were in my class at the Lincolnview school district in Van Wert County when I was growing up. Lincolnview is a super rural district, to the extent that it doesn’t actually have a town attached to it, but one of their campuses was in Middle Point and many of the students came from there. (And I will note that the name of the town is Middle Point with two words, not Middlepoint, as the link above says. Just makes me wonder how many other errors are out there on state databases and stuff that it would take a local to spot.)

Given the proximity and the surname and the fact that both Michael and Michelle are listed as “friends” on Kori’s Facebook page (along with five other Glossetts), I’m sure Kori has got to be a close relative of those kids I attended school with. Probably not a full brother, because Michael and Michelle are biracial (black and white) and Kori is listed as white. But perhaps a half brother or a cousin.

I actually saw Michelle at a gas station in Van Wert a few months ago, and I was aware of Kori’s disappearance at the time, but I didn’t think to ask her about it until I’d already left.

I’ve never actually known anyone from my life prior to my missing persons involvement who had a relative that disappeared and stayed gone this long. I do have a longtime friend whose grandfather (I think?) disappeared, and he asked me for advice on what to do about it, but the missing man was found (dead, alas) a week or so later.

Anyway. I’ll do the best I can for Kori.

[EDIT: Gah, this is proving difficult. The published information about Kori’s tattoos may be inaccurate. I found photos of the tattoos on his Facebook page but they’re not clear enough to read. See Charley’s Facebook page. Sigh.]

Let’s Talk About It: William and Margaret Patterson

Middle-aged married couple William Durrell Patterson, 52, and Margaret M. Patterson, 42, vanished from El Paso, Texas on March 5, 1957. They were last seen by a neighbor who dropped by with some Girl Scout cookies. Margaret looked upset at the time and William didn’t seem to want company. That night there was unspecified “unusual activity” observed at the Patterson home. The next day they were gone, and it looked like they had left in a hurry.

William in particular seems to have been involved in some kind of sketchy things. His own father said he “made his living doing sleight-of-hand tricks” and he had always expected the Pattersons to disappear eventually.

There are some indications that they left of their own accord, the appearance of the house nonwithstanding. Let’s break it down:

  • On March 15, the Pattersons’ accountant got a telegram with instructions on how to manage their business in their absence. HOWEVER, the telegram was signed “W.H. Patterson” and not “W.D. Patterson.” The obvious explanations I can think of are (1) William did not really send that telegram or (2) William did send the telegram but messed up his initials on purpose as a duress signal.
  • William’s mistress, who lived in Juarez, said she saw him in the early morning hours of March 6 (the day after he and Margaret were seen in El Paso) and he told her he had important things to tell her and “when they come for me, I’ll have to go in a hurry.” HOWEVER, she later recanted this statement. What I’m wondering is: if William had important things to tell her, why not just tell her right then, since they were together and all?
  • The couple’s business associates went around telling everyone they were on an extended vacation. No word as to where they were getting this information, but as a result they weren’t reported missing for five months.
  • The Pattersons’ lawyer eventually got a letter, supposedly from William, postmarked May 29. It said they were getting out of dodge and would not be returning, and instructing that their property should be divided up. HOWEVER, the selection of heirs was…curious, to say the least, and handwriting experts were not sure that William had actually signed the letter, and for several legal reasons (starting with the fact that Margaret co-owned the couple’s photography business), it had no actual value as a will.

In 1984, a witness went to the police and said he had been hired to clean the Pattersons’ home after they disappeared and he saw blood in the garage, a piece of human scalp stuck to William’s boat propeller, and someone carrying away bloodstained sheets. The witness was an illegal immigrant and he said he didn’t go to the police at the time because he was afraid he’d be deported. I’ve got no idea if there’s any evidence to back up his statement. I’ve watched Forensic Files; I know they have all sorts of gizmos and experts in all kinds of obscure fields of crime scene analysis and it seems like if the house had still been there, they might have found something.

For what it’s worth, Margaret was completely estranged from her family. They hadn’t heard from her in 20 years and they assumed she was dead, which is an odd assumption if you ask me. She was a young healthy woman and she doesn’t appear to have vanished out of their lives into thin air; she became estranged from them because they disapproved of her marriage to William. So why would they assume she was dead?

Now, it’s been 60 years, and both of the Pattersons would be over 100 years old by now, so it’s a safe bet to assume they’re not alive anymore. What I would like to know is: do y’all think they were alive after 1957?

Let’s talk about it.