Well, I’m off

Yeah, so Michael and I are leaving to catch our flight to Poland in a little bit. Until we return home on June 5, I’ll only be semi-available at best. We’re not taking our smartphones because of security concerns (of both the “pickpocket” and “government snooping into our data” variety). I’m bringing my tablet though, and we will have wifi in the various places we’re staying in.

You guys be good while I’m gone and don’t do anything I wouldn’t do.

Well, that was fun

Yeah, so I’m back from Reynoldsburg, Ohio, where they held an event today to honor the missing children of Ohio. Although I showed up in an unofficial capacity only, I had a blast.

I mainly came cause Gina DeJesus, one of the Cleveland kidnap survivors, was speaking. The event was at the Messiah Lutheran Church. I showed up slightly late and had to sit in the back. There were several speakers before Gina, and I spent some time trying to figure out which one of the people sitting in the audience was her. It was fairly easy because half or more of the attendees were black, and most of the rest were white. I zeroed in on two brown-skinned women in the front but couldn’t figure out which one was Gina. They turned out to be Gina and her older sister Myra.

My view from the back of the church; Gina is on the right and Myra is on the left.
My view from the back of the church during the sisters’ speeches; Gina is on the right and Myra is on the left.

Anyway, Gina read a speech off several sheets of paper about how it was important to pay attention to missing persons bulletins, and it was important to pay attention to your surroundings and the people in your neighborhood and so on because you never knew who might be hiding something. I mean, people went inside Ariel Castro’s house and had no clue about the women held captive there. I think a lot of that is because the idea that your friend, neighbor or relative might have three kidnapped women locked in his basement is just something that would not occur to most people.

Myra spoke also, and talked about what life was like having a missing family member. One of the things she mentioned was how a man known to the family told her parents, reassuringly, something like “Don’t worry, they won’t find her dead.

That man was named Ariel Castro.

There was an intermission before a middle school choir showed up to sing a song. I went around talking to people — not Gina, I was not sure whether to approach her or not at that point — and handing out business cards. There were booths about various topics set up in the lobby and an adorable remote-controlled talking boat that went around telling people about boat safety. I told the boat about the time I nearly drowned in Lake Michigan at age five, failing to mention the fact that this near-tragedy did not involve a boat, just some poorly supervised beach time.

Me and the talking robot boat.
Me and the talking robot boat.
Gina (far right) with members of the anti human trafficking group Break Every Chain.
Gina (far right) with members of the anti human trafficking group Break Every Chain.

So after all that was over we had a balloon release in the parking lot. Fortunately the wind cooperated.

Just before the balloon release.
Just before the balloon release.
Post balloon release. Each one has a missing child's name attached.
Post balloon release. Each one has a missing child’s name attached.

Just before we all left, I decided to approach Gina after seeing some other people do so. We didn’t really talk but she consented to have her photo taken with me before we parted ways. I wish I had remembered to smile in the picture. It was one of those days where it was cloudy out (it rained later) but the light hurt your eyes anyway, and I was squinting so hard I forgot about smiling.

Gina DeJesus (right) and me.
Gina DeJesus (right) and me.

And then I went home.

Altogether it was a most profitable visit. I made some contacts and hope to return next  year.

ET today, my best so far this year

I had an Executed Today entry posted this day, for Oscar Jackson, who was lynched in Wright County, Minnesota on April 25, 1859. His execution/murder was the flashpoint for an interesting but little-known event in Minnesota history known as the Wright County War. Fun fact: one of the suspected lynchers was later elected to the Minnesota House of Representatives.

I do believe (and the Headsman seems to believe) that this is my best entry so far for 2017, although I actually wrote it last summer.

ET #218: William and John Dyon

My 218th Executed Today entry was published yesterday: the hangings of William Dyon and his son John, who had murdered William’s brother (another John) in Doncaster, England in 1828. The two killers weren’t terribly bright; they went around telling everyone who would listen that they hated the victim, they even said they wanted to kill the victim, they allowed themselves to get spotted in the area with their rifles, and William left distinctive boot prints at the crime scene.