Let’s talk about it: Robby Floyd, her sister, and her children

32-year-old Robby Ann Hughes Floyd, her 17-year-old sister Jennifer Jane Hughes, and her children, Sarena Natoya Glenn, age 11, and 4-year-old twins Brent Nicholas Hughes and Brenttany Nicole Hughes, all dropped of sight in Fayetteville, North Carolina in December 1996 — almost twenty years ago. Both twins had a heart condition that needed treatment. Because Robby didn’t keep in regular touch with her family, they all weren’t reported missing until August 1998, almost two years later.

This is one of the casefiles on Charley that was researched and written by my predecessor, Jennifer Marra, of Doe Network and MPCCN fame; I haven’t contributed much to it.

There is some question as to whether they’re actually missing or not. They had been on the NCMEC but they’re not anymore; they’re not currently listed on NamUs and I don’t think they ever were. Furthermore, there’s a 2004 article about them headlined “Missing family is not missing”, which says Robby used several alias names and was wanted for writing bad checks. The article also says Sarena called her father in 1998 and contacted another relative in 1999. The police concluded the family was simply hiding out, perhaps in Alabama.

However… the WRAL television station ran a piece on the family in 2011, seven years after the previous article I mentioned, that said they ARE missing:

“We’ve checked activity on their social security numbers and there’s no activity,” said Lt. Jimmy Black of the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office. “No schools have called for their records. It’s as if they don’t exist anymore.”

That’s where the matter rests, as far as I can tell. I haven’t been able to find any more recent press coverage. But it boggles my mind how an entire family can disappear so completely, and how it wasn’t even noticed for quite some time.

So what happened? Let’s talk about it.

MP of the week: Hakan Karacay

This week’s featured missing person is Hakan Karacay, a Turkish immigrant who’d been living in the United States for eleven years when he disappeared from Clifton, New Jersey in 1999. The car he was driving, actually his brother’s, turned up on a remote road in the Adirondacks in New York five days later; the battery was dead and the tank was empty.

It’s a peculiar case. I wish I had more information about it.

MP for the week: Amanda Rivera

This week’s featured missing person is Amanda Marie Rivera, who was 14 years old when she disappeared on my fifth birthday: October 5, 1990. Last seen when someone dropped her off at a friend’s house in either La Mesa or Spring Valley, both of them cities in southern California.

Most cases like Amanda’s get written off as runaways, but for as long as I can remember she’s been classified as endangered missing. I don’t know why. I also don’t know why there’s two different places of disappearance and two different clothing descriptions given.

In fact, I have almost zero details about her disappearance at all, and I haven’t been able to find anything in the way of recent news that yields useful information. Of news about her from 1990, I’ve found nothing at all.

If Amanda is still alive, she’d be 40 today.

An aside: I really hope to be able to update today — I promised I would, and I found a lot of info on Daffany Tullos and Karen Zhou that I want to share with y’all. But my psychiatrist switched my meds again and I’m absolutely exhausted. I hope I get used to it soon and get my energy back.

Cynthia Day identified

I’ve still got her on Charley but not for much longer: Cynthia Louise Day, a 37-year-old mother of two who disappeared from National City, Illinois on August 10, 1990, has finally been identified.

Her remains were actually recovered in Pike County, Missouri (about an hour and a half away from National City), just sixteen days after she disappeared. Due to some error, an official missing persons report wasn’t filed for Cynthia for 14 years, which certainly didn’t help when it came to finding her.

All that was left of Cynthia was “a box of bones”, they were able to get one usable fingerprint and that was enough. It’s a good thing they were able to get that print, because lab technicians had BOILED the bones and that ruined chance of recovering DNA evidence. Apparently this boiling thing was common practice before DNA technology came onto the scene.

(Reading about that kind of thing reminds me of a historical TV medical drama I saw once, set in 1905, where the hospital was showing off their brand new X-ray machine, the latest thing in medical technology. The TV characters were like, “You have to hold your hand in front of the machine for about ninety seconds, and then you can see all the bones inside it. Isn’t it neat? Want to try it again?” And I was wincing and thinking “Nooooo! Don’t do it!” By the end of the show, the X-ray technician had died of radiation poisoning.)

Anyway… now begins the murder investigation. Cynthia was allegedly involved with prostitution and drugs, and she had a rocky relationship with her boyfriend, who disappeared shortly after she did and later ended up in prison. That’s a lot to be getting on with.

But at least Cynthia’s daughters can bury her.

MP of the week: Richard Clark

This week’s featured missing person is Richard Victor Clark II, one of the few cases I have never updated in the nearly twelve-year history of the Charley Project. Clark was 21 years old when he disappeared from the central Texas city of Temple on August 7, 1992. If he’s still alive he’d be 45.

I doubt he’s still alive, though. I don’t have much on his disappearance but it really doesn’t look good.

Select It Sunday: Brian Neil Hooks

Two people — named Andi and Andy, oddly enough — have asked me to do Brian Neil Hooks for Select It Sunday. The 21-year-old has been missing from Florence, South Carolina since September 24, 1988 — nearly 28 years ago. He may go by his middle name.

Andi thinks Brian may be a John Doe whose skeletal remains were found in in St. Louis, Missouri in 1992. The decedent, who is estimated to have died sometime between 1989 and 1992, had been stabbed to death. About that suggestion, I have no comment. Matching MPs with UIDs has never been my thing.

Someone, a relative I think, set up a Facebook page for Brian. The most recent post as of this writing, dated June 24, would resonate with anyone who has a missing loved one:

I would do anything to talk and hug you one last time! You cross my mind more than I see your face, I pray for you more than you may hear my voice, I miss you more than you think and I love you more than you know sometimes you just have to be strong ..to keep yourself from breaking You will never know how much you miss hearing a voice until that voice is silenced forever…the worst thing in this world is not knowing where you are we miss you an love you so much the pain of you not being here is unreal at times it’s been to long for us not to know what happen to you […] The worst goodbyes are the ones that are never said, And never explained…

Brian was either gay or bisexual, and had a boyfriend at the time of his disappearance. The boyfriend claims he simply “ran off” without saying where he was going, and never came back. That’s a story I’ve heard many times before. Another source I found claims Brian’s boyfriend gave three different stories to explain Brian’s disappearance, and also says the man had been convicted of murder.

That certainly doesn’t look good. Almost 30 years of complete silence looks even worse.

A few tiny updates, and a bit of thinking aloud

Sheldon Boyd has a new picture, as does Nicole Evelyn Silvers, and Shaliegh Sharrie Phillips has an updated AP, and Jesse Yancey‘s date of disappearance has been corrected; it had said May 31 but NamUs says it was actually May 28. I’ve also corrected his race; I had said he was white but NamUs says he’s Native American.

Now…is it just me or does Nicole Silvers’s disappearance look kind of suspicious? She was sixteen and the police claimed she was an emancipated minor. To quote this legal site:

A minor who is “emancipated” assumes most adult responsibilities before reaching the age of majority (usually 18). Emancipated minors are no longer considered to be under the care and control of parents — instead, they take responsibility for their own care… If a young person under the age of majority is emancipated, the parent or guardian no longer has any say over the minor’s life. An emancipated minor can keep earnings from a job, decide where to live, make his or her own medical decisions, and more.

In other words, if she was emancipated, Nicole did not need to run away.

There’s a bit of a rub, though — I saw a post on Websleuths from someone who said “According to her parents, Nicole was NOT emancipated.”

I don’t know what means — if she wasn’t emancipated why would the police claim she was? Was she in the process of getting emancipated? Or was it just a completely incorrect statement from the cops/media? I don’t know and I wish someone who does could get in touch with me. I haven’t said anything in Nicole’s profile about the disputed info because “info shared by police to the media” trumps “second-hand statement posted on Websleuths” in my mind.