Pride Month: Edmond Tillman

In honor of Pride Month I’m featuring a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer missing person every day for the month of June. Today’s case is Edmond Tillman, a fourteen-year-old boy who went missing from Manhattan on August 10, 2005. He is gay and had recently come out to his mother. He was supposedly dating someone older, and his case is classified as a runaway.

At this point, a full thirteen years later, I have to wonder if Edmond really did run away, or if did but he came to harm afterwards — perhaps trafficking. I also wonder if his coming-out to his mom was really as smooth as she says. A lot of LGBTQ teens run away because feel were rejected by their families.

I hope he turns up alive and well and happy, wherever he is.

MP of the week: Deandre Brown

This week’s featured missing person is Deandre Nativoni Brown, a 22-year-old who disappeared from Jasper, Alabama on July 29, 2005.

It doesn’t look good for him: witnesses heard shots fired, the police found Brown’s bloodstained clothing, and the vehicle he was driving was found abandoned and burned.

MP of the week: Heather Bloom

This week’s featured missing person is Heather Bloom, a 28-year-old woman with Down Syndrome who was last seen in Berkeley, California on October 1, 2005. She probably disappeared sometime after that though.

People with Down Syndrome have various levels of functionality, and it sounds like Heather was at the lower end: non-verbal, wheelchair-bound and requiring “constant care and supervision.”

She was being cared for by her sister, Shari. After Heather’s parents reported her missing, the police tried to check on her welfare, but Shari wouldn’t let them in the house and they never actually saw Heather. The neighbors also said they never saw Heather either. Last I knew, Shari had moved to Norway — without her sister, presumably.

I did find this 2017 article which has more info about the case and additional pictures of Heather. Though the police are saying there’s no evidence she’s dead or in danger, honestly, to me it doesn’t look good. I mean, a person with those medical conditions would presumably have had to see doctors regularly. She was probably on Medicaid and Social Security disability. They should be able to track her if she was still alive.

Black History Month: Marcus Daniel

In honor of Black History Month I’m profiling one African-American MP every day on this blog for the month of February. Today’s case is Marcus J. Daniel, a University of Missouri student who disappeared from Columbia on December 6, 2002. I don’t know what he was studying or whether he was last seen on campus or what. He was 25 years old and would be 40 today.

Marcus apparently left of his own accord; he wrote a goodbye note to his dad, and a few days after his disappearance he sent his mom a letter postmarked Chicago. Perhaps as a result, he wasn’t reported missing until 2005.

He may believe he has good reasons for staying under the radar these past 15 years. In which case I recommend he contact the police and verify his identity and well-being. That way they can close his case and his family will know he is safe, but whatever new life he’s carved out for himself does not have to be disrupted.

There’s a current-age thingy now

Y’all might have noticed that now, in cases where there’s a date of birth available, the computer automatically calculates what the MP’s current age would be.

It’s kind of eerie for me. Like, I was touching up Breiton Ackerman‘s casefile and noticed: my god, this kid would be 18 now. Graduating high school, off to college or the workforce or the Army or wherever life would have taken him. But instead he’s four forever.

First MP of the week for 2018: Carina Karras

This week’s featured missing person is Carina Lynn Karras, twenty, missing since December 31, 2005. I have lots of pictures of her, ten in fact, but very little info on her disappearance. She was taking a train to Las Vegas and I don’t know if she disappeared en route or after she arrived.

Given that it’s Las Vegas and with Carina being a young woman and it having been twelve years, I’m concerned for her safety. I wish I knew more about this case.

Let’s talk about it: Bryan Hayes and Mark Degner

I find the disappearance of best friends Mark Anthony Degner and Bryan Andrew Hayes puzzling and troubling. They’ve been missing from Jacksonville, Florida since February 1, 2005 — twelve years, nearly twelve and a half.

At first the circumstances of the boys’ cases look pedestrian enough: they were living in a group home, told friends they were going to run away, and apparently did just that. They were even sighted in Holly Hill, a small town south of Jacksonville on the Florida coast, two months later.

And yet.

The boys, at just twelve (Mark) and thirteen (Bryan), were extremely young to have been gone this long. Bryan had run away before, but never for longer than a day, and Mark had no history of running away. Furthermore, they were developmentally delayed, functioning on the level of seven- to ten-year-old children, and both suffered from bipolar disorder.

How could they have remained off the map this long? Did the boys meet with foul play? If they’re still alive, why haven’t they resurfaced and who’s helping them stay hidden? Were relatives investigated? Were some member or members of the boys’ families unhappy that they were living in a group home? Or is it possible they fell victim to sex trafficking? Due to their disabilities. I should think they would have been extremely vulnerable to any kind of exploitation — even more so than most runaways.

The case reminds me of Clayton Lynn McCarter and Rodney Michael Scott, who ran away from a Bowling Green, Kentucky children’s home three and a half years ago and still haven’t been found. They were almost the same age: fifteen and thirteen. Clayton was developmentally delayed and had psychiatric issues, just like Mark and Bryan, and there’s a good chance Rodney had similar problems though I don’t know that for sure. I’m not suggesting McCarter/Scott disappearances are related to Mark and Bryan’s, though, given the distance in both time and space.

So what do you think happened to Mark Degner and Bryan Hayes? Let’s talk about it.