Thinking aloud in today’s updates

  1. This may be setting some kind of record in how many murder-without-a-body cases were included in a single day’s update: there are seven here (or five if you want to get picky). I’ve got John Charles Cizek, Marcia Ann Forsberg, Hoggle siblings Jacob and Sarah, Donna Mae Jokumsen, and Lyon sisters Katherine and Sheila.
  2. The info I added to Marcia Forsberg’s page came from one of those “keep in touch with your high school class” type sites. In her profile on the page, Marcia talks about how happy she is in her marriage to her husband, described as her “soul mate and best friend” and “the love of my life.” Little knowing that the love of her life would, by his own admission, kill and dismember her a couple of years later. That’s hella depressing to read.
  3. Why is the NCMEC using Photograph 1 of Cynthia Bravo on their poster for her when Photograph 2 (via CDOJ) is so much better quality?
  4. I wonder if it’s significant that Cynthia disappeared just before her birthday. In Hispanic communities there’s something called the quinceanera or the fiesta de quince aƱos, where there’s a massive party on a girl’s fifteenth birthday and she dresses up in a fancy formal dress, something like a prom dress or a wedding dress; it’s a rite of passage celebrating the girl’s transition from childhood to womanhood. Cynthia is Hispanic and vanished just one day before she would have turned fifteen. Just a thought.
  5. Another question/thought about Cynthia: who the heck runs away with no shoes on?
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Flashback Friday: Willie Ann Rucker

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Willie Ann Rucker, who went by her middle name. She was 27 and recently divorced when she disappeared from Waterloo, Iowa on April 8, 1979. Her family believes her boyfriend may have been involved; they were having problems.

I don’t have much on this case. Rucker’s son David Barrett, who was just a baby when she disappeared, became a professional football player, so there’s that.

MP of the week: Whitney Sanders

This week’s featured missing person is Whitney Nicole Sanders, a 21-year-old woman who was last seen in Jacksonville, Florida during the early morning hours on September 20, 2013. I don’t have a lot on this case, but Whitney was the victim of an earlier crime that could be related to her disappearance: she was robbed and beaten a month before she was last seen, and the police had still not arrested anyone. Her mom theorizes that whoever robbed her might have been involved in her case.

MP of the week (a day late, sorry): Beverly Ribley

Yeah, so yesterday afternoon I had written a bunch of updates, then I had to leave the house for my weekly therapy appointment, and upon my return I felt awfully tired and lay down for a nap, and didn’t wake up until it was too late to post said updates.

Well, they’re up now, and my new MP of the week is Beverly Joan Ribley, missing from Spring Valley, California on April 27, 1975 — 42 years ago. She’d be 71 if she were still alive, but I doubt that she is.

I also added new pics of JoJo Boswell and Tiffani Amber Streling yesterday.

Select It Sunday: Carla Vicentini

Vivi D., a woman from Brazil, asked me to profile fellow Brazilian Carla Vicentini. I was going to make her my MP of the week but decided to do a Select It Sunday case for her instead.

Carla was 22 and living in Newark, New Jersey on a cultural exchange program when she disappeared on February 9, 2006. Vivi D., when asking for me to give the case some publicity, said, “There was not a lot of publicity in her case since she was a student in Brazil, she was there only a month when it happened.” Carla’s Charley Project casefile notes that her case “has been well-covered in the media in Brazil and in Portuguese-language newspapers in New Jersey, but the mainstream American press has given it little attention.”

I haven’t updated Carla’s case since 2009, but I ought to. I found this 2010 article and this 2015 article, both from the Star-Ledger newspaper, with additional details about her case.

She was a very attractive young woman, didn’t speak much English, and was perhaps a bit naive — she grew up in a small farming community in Brazil, and Newark is a pretty rough city. She was last seen leaving a bar with a strange man; my guess is he was either a trafficker or, more likely, a garden-variety predator who wouldn’t take no for an answer, and that he knows what happened to her. The problem is that he has yet to be identified.

Not sure what to do with this one

CDOJ has got a case in their database that puzzles me: one “Anuradha Fnu“, missing from Fremont, California on March 24, 2015.

The thing is, I’m quite sure that’s not her name. The letters “FNU” are used on official documents in this country to stand for “Family Name Unknown.”

I Googled “Anuradha” and that seems to be a common first name in India. That makes sense for this woman; CDOJ says she’s Indian.

I tried Googling “Fnu India” in hopes of discovering that “Fnu” was also a real Indian name, but nope. Instead I found this page written by this poor sap who moved from India to the U.S. only to have his surname mistakenly listed as Fnu on all his documents. (His real surname was listed as part of his first name.) He wrote his story to tell other people in the same situation how to correct the mistake.

I don’t know whether I should just put this woman up on Charley as “Anuradha Fnu” or whether I should just list her as “Anuradha” and explain that her last name isn’t available.

Thoughts, anyone?