MP of the week: Kristi Krebs

This week’s featured missing person is Kristi Suzanne Krebs, a 22-year-old woman who disappeared from Fort Bragg, California on August 9, 1993. She had had one nervous breakdown before and may have suffered another that precipitated her disappearance.

Her car was found stuck in a creek in a state park, with no sign of her. Among the items left inside were her wallet and ID, as well as her undergarments — but not her other clothes. There’s been no sign of her since.

In other news, I’m feeling much better, nausea gone etc. And I’ve renewed my subscription to Ancestry till February so I can get photos from there; it’s an excellent resource for that. For example, I’ve found a photo of Howard Woolwine that I’ve replaced his previous photo with. Not only was the previous pic (supplied by the Virginia State Police missing persons listing) of very poor quality, but I’ve never been sure it was him; it appears to show a young black or Hispanic man, and Woolwine was an elderly white man.

The Ancestry subscription is expensive, $80 for just three months’ use, so I’m not sure how long I can continue to use it, but it’s mine till February.

I’ve been busy all day but hope I can get a proper update in tomorrow evening.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.

Native American Heritage Month: Sumi Juan

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Sumi Gail Juan, a 33-year-old Hoopa woman who disappeared from Hoopa, California on September 8, 2010.

Hoopa, California is a town in northern California and per Wikipedia, 80-plus percentage of the population is Native.

The police noted they had two persons of interest, also Native, whom they wanted to talk to: Robert Hodge Jr. and Debra Jealous-Of-Him.

It’s worth noting I’ve found NO mention AT ALL about Sumi since 2010 and I’m not 100% sure she is still missing.

Native American Heritage Month: Sally Hines

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Sally Ann Hines, a 58-year-old Seaconke Wampanoag woman who disappeared from San Antonio, Texas on December 14, 2017. The Seaconke Wampanoags are from Rhode Island.

I found this flier from the Facebook group Missing and Taken Indigenous People that has a little more info about her, including a photo of her in the clothes she was last seen wearing, and the fact that she has breast implants.

hines

Sally has multiple health problems including PTSD, bipolar disorder and a liver transplant. She needs daily medication to keep her body from rejecting her donor liver. Because of this I don’t see how she could still be alive. If she is alive she must be in VERY bad shape. She would be about 60 today.

Native American Heritage Month: Marion Gonangnan

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Marion Gonangnan, a 32-year-old woman who disappeared from Anchorage in 2003. I don’t have tribal info for her. The site Justice For Native Women says she had spent a lot of her life in the lower 48 states, was unhappy in Alaska and wanted to return to California, where she’d spent her younger years.

Marion may have been suffering from an ectopic pregnancy at the time of her disappearance. Basically, that happens when the fertilized egg implants in the fallopian tube rather than the uterus. The only treatment is to terminate the pregnancy; if left untreated, this is a life-threatening condition.

That alone would make her disappearance concerning, but Marion’s lifestyle indicates foul play could have been involved in her case. She had a history of drug abuse, sex work and “residential instability”, and a violent relationship with her boyfriend. (He was in jail when she went missing, though, so he isn’t a suspect.)

It seems likely that Marion is deceased. If still alive, she would be 48 today.

MP of the week: Kayla Welcome

I got my days mixed up; for some reason I thought Tuesday was Monday. That’s why my missing person of the week is a day late. Anyway, this week it’s Kayla Marie Welcome, a 23-year-old woman who disappeared from St. Cloud, Florida on May 7, 2015.

She’s of white and Puerto Rican descent and has several tattoos, though I don’t have any descriptions for them. I do have a photo of part of one of the tattoos, which is on Kayla’s thigh. I think it’s a word starting with C and the second letter is probably an H but I can’t guess any further than that.

I don’t know much about Kayla’s disappearance, but I do know she has a history of drug use and an arrest record for the same. She may have traveled to Uncasville, Connecticut after she went missing. If still alive, Kayla would be 28 today.

An unprecedented communication

So I heard from a lawyer today; they sent me an email regarding one of my cases. I am going to refer to the missing woman and her husband by the pseudonyms “Allison” and “Chad” because I don’t particularly want to hear from anyone else connected to the case, and don’t want this blog entry to turn up on a keyword search. However, this case should be pretty easy for viewers to find on Charley.

So Allison disappeared towards the end of a messy divorce from Chad. Her body has never been found. Chad was charged with her murder, and wound up being tried FOUR TIMES, which may be a Charley Project record. The result was this:

  • Trial #1: Conviction, overturned
  • Trial #2: Conviction, overturned
  •  Trial #3: Hung jury
  • Trial #4: Acquittal

It was just a big mess. Chad is probably guilty, but “probably” does not equal “beyond a reasonable doubt.” And a person ought to get a fair trial the FIRST time, not the fourth.

So now he’s suing for wrongful prosecution or something-or-other. I wonder if it’ll go anywhere. He was a wealthy businessman, but his wealth has probably been drained considerably by four trials’ worth of legal expenses, and it would have been difficult for him to run his businesses from behind bars.

So back to the lawyer. They are representing the defense in Chad’s lawsuit, and wanted to know if Chad had ever donated to the Charley Project, and why was Allison listed on the site in the first place, and how long had she been up there. I replied that Allison is just one out of 13,000+ cases and there’s nothing special about her being on there, and that to my knowledge I have never either heard from Chad or received a donation from him, or from anyone else connected to the case for that matter.

MP of the week: Kelly Whiddon

This week’s featured missing person is Kelly Allison Whiddon, a 44-year-old woman who disappeared from Panama City Beach, Florida on April 8, 2016. She goes by her middle name.

It seems likely that Whiddon was murdered by her live-in boyfriend, William Daily. They were in the process of a breakup at the time of her disappearance, and Whiddon’s brother got a tape-recorded admission from Daily that he had caused her death. However, the police haven’t been able to file charges against Daily for lack of admissible evidence. (The tape recording is not considered admissible in court.)