Well, this is messed up

So I saw this case posted on NamUs and Googled her to start the process of putting her on Charley too. And I found this article. I don’t think the poor woman, Julie Mott, qualifies for the Charley Project, but her case is certainly puzzling and disturbing.

Julie died of natural causes on August 8, 2015. She was only twenty-five. On August 15, her loved ones held a memorial service for her. Sometime after the service, before the body could be interred, it disappeared. It has never been found.

I think I speak for everyone when I say: WHO DOES THAT?!!!

They have a person of interest, per the article:

A year later, surveillance video was given to San Antonio Police by Mission Park Funeral Home of Mott’s former boyfriend, Bill Willburn, twice attempting to enter the funeral despite previously being served a criminal trespass warrant.

Wilburn was arrested and charged with two counts of criminal trespassing.

He has consistently denied stealing Mott’s remains and was never charged with the crime.

Well, the thought of Willburn being involved is …icky, to say the least. I don’t know whether he did it or not, of course. And I don’t know which is worse, the idea that Julie’s body was stolen by a man who loved her (it’s happened before) or that it was stolen by a stranger for god knows what nefarious purpose.

Julie’s family sued the funeral home and was awarded $8 million. They’ve advertised a reward for the return of her remains, but they have never been found and I doubt they ever will be.

A bad photo is better than none at all (and other thoughts on recent updates)

Just added Amanda Elise Southern to Charley. The 28-year-old woman disappeared from a nightclub in Catahoula Parish, Louisiana 26 years ago. Unfortunately the only photo I could find of her is absolutely terrible, but what can you do?

Reading the articles about how her ex tried to SELL THEIR KIDS (albeit to their grandparents) after her disappearance, I was struck by how much confidentiality and privacy norms have changed in the past few decades.

I can understand publicizing the kids’ information because for awhile they were missing. (When Amanda’s parents refused to pay for custody of the children, the dad took off with them and was on the lam for over a month.) But then when in the articles talking about how they were found, there was all sorts of information about the children and what they had been through, including the fact that they were believed to have been sexually abused. That kind of thing would not be published in the newspaper today.

I hope the kids are all right. I think Amanda’s parents got custody of them after they were found with their father. It seems super unlikely that she would have just walked away, what with one of the kids having disabilities, her parents living out of state and the children’s father overseas.

Some other random thinking-out-loud stuff:

  • I am not sure that Courtney Corrinna Holden is really white. She is pretty dark-skinned and looks more likely to be Hispanic or maybe Native American. Certainly I’ve seen mistakes in this area before. She is adopted, but one article mentions that she was in touch with her biological brother, so it seems like this is something the police should know for sure. Shrug.
    In any case, her story is incredibly sad. Especially the details about her family nickname “Cinderella” and her son calling his grandmother “mom” and his uncle “dad.” The articles I read said her son even did this before Courtney went missing. I cannot imagine how sad and scared and trapped Courtney must have felt, and I doubt she’s alive today.
  • The guy Melissa Ann Jordon was last seen with is SERIOUSLY bad news. Judges see a lot of crazy stuff and I was stuck by that judge saying Mr. Nesbitt was one of the most violent and dangerous criminals she’d ever encountered in her career. The “felon in possession of a firearm” thing was something he pled down to, by the way; the original incident involved him breaking into his ex-wife’s house and holding her at gunpoint.
    Given how long his sentence is, I wonder if the authorities have ever tried to sit down with him since he was imprisoned, pointed out he doesn’t have much to lose, and asked him to tell what happened to Melissa. I’m sure he knows.
    (Melissa’s NamUs photo, btw, is a high school yearbook photo and almost ten years out of date. That’s why I didn’t use it, as I found a more current pic in Newspapers.)
  • I dunno what I would do without Facebook as a source for recent cases. Okay, I do know what I’d do, I’d put up the cases, but there would be a lot less info. The case of Melissa Rose Ann Garrett is a great example; her daughter posted a bunch of photos of her and more info about her disappearance. Sad story. The daughter seems to suspect Melissa’s boyfriend may have been involved. Anne Marie Hubbert is another case where most of the pictures and some of the other info came from Facebook; Anne’s page and her daughter’s.
  • Shakeeta Young disappeared just a few months after her nineteen-year-old son died. I found a few “RIP” posts on Facebook from some of the young man’s friends but no mention of a cause of death. I wonder if Shakeeta’s disappearance is in some way related. It’s very sad for their family, just bad luck all around there.

Native American Heritage Month: Sally Hines

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Sally Ann Hines, a 58-year-old Seaconke Wampanoag woman who disappeared from San Antonio, Texas on December 14, 2017. The Seaconke Wampanoags are from Rhode Island.

I found this flier from the Facebook group Missing and Taken Indigenous People that has a little more info about her, including a photo of her in the clothes she was last seen wearing, and the fact that she has breast implants.

hines

Sally has multiple health problems including PTSD, bipolar disorder and a liver transplant. She needs daily medication to keep her body from rejecting her donor liver. Because of this I don’t see how she could still be alive. If she is alive she must be in VERY bad shape. She would be about 60 today.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Denis Revolorio Perez

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Denis Ariel Revolorio Perez, who disappeared from the border city of McAllen, Texas on April 30, 2018. He was 24.

Denis is from Guatemala and at the time of his disappearance, he and a friend were trying to cross the U.S. border illegally by swimming across the Rio Grande. (NamUs has it as “Bravo River” and I’m assuming that’s from the Spanish name for the river, Río Bravo del Norte.) Anyway, Denis’s friend made it; Denis did not and is presumed drowned.

He’s listed with the Hidalgo County Sheriff’s Office and presumably with the Mexican authorities as well, as is his remains could turn up on either side.

I found out a little bit more about Denis on Facebook and got some photos from there. He was from Santa Rosa, Guatemala and apparently worked as a dairy farmer. His family still hopes he’s alive, and there is a video in Spanish of a reporter with a woman, presumably a relative of Denis’s, holding up his picture and talking about him. (I cannot understand Spanish.) He came to the U.S. looking for a better life.

It is a HORRIBLY dangerous journey and the desert border areas of northern Mexico and the southwest U.S. are scattered with the remains of migrants who didn’t make it. I know they have a hard time trying to identify the bodies. There’s been an attempt to map migrant deaths; the link shows a map restricted to just one country in Arizona, and it’s got over 3,000 bodies recorded on it.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Ines Paredes

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Ines Paredes, a 33-year-old woman who disappeared on March 26, 2009.

There isn’t a whole lot of information available. She boarded a bus in Houston, en route to her home in Mexico, but just where in Mexico isn’t said. It would have been a long trip, as Houston is halfway across the state from the nearest border crossing. She apparently never arrived at her destination.

I’m not sure whether the border authorities keep a record of exactly who crosses where, and how the situation is handled with things like a bus. Because the Harris County Sheriff’s Office is investigating Ines’s case, I would guess they think she never made as far as Mexico.

It’s noted that Ines may be driving a yellow 1999 Ford pickup with Texas plates. I don’t know how the vehicle is associated with her, since she is supposed to have left in a bus. A lot of unanswered questions here.

If still alive, Ines Paredes would be 44 now.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Rosio Beltran

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Rosio Monica Beltran, a 26-year-old who disappeared from North Richland Hills, Texas on September 9, 2000.

All indications are Beltran was the victim of a homicide. She met a man, Mario Pietro, at a nightclub and went back to his place, and neighbors heard the sounds of fighting and screaming. Later, Beltran’s blood was found at Pietro’s residence.

Unfortunately, the prime suspect is dead; Pietro stole a car and took off, and two days later, after a confrontation with police, they shot him dead when he pointed a gun at them. It turned out to be a BB gun.

Rosio Beltran was from Peru and was in the US working as an au pair and learning English. She planned to return to Peru and become a teacher, but that never happened.

She would be 45 today.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Nora Aguayo-Flores

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Nora Aguayo-Flores, a black/Hispanic woman who disappeared from Pasadena, Texas on May 26, 2012. She was 28 years old, and if still alive would be 36 today.

Unfortunately I don’t know much about the circumstances of Nora’s disappearance. I do have some information on her many tattoos, including photos of three of them.