Has the real Paul Fronczak been found? I’m uncertain.

So earlier this week there was an article on from a Las Vegas news outlet saying Paul Fronczak, the one that was stolen from the hospital as a newborn in 1964, has been located and is living in Michigan. The article promised more information later.

(The case is incredibly complicated and I recommend you check out Paul’s casefile on Charley. In a nutshell:

Paul was stolen from a Chicago hospital on April 27, 1964, just 36 hours after birth, by a woman who has posed as a nurse and has never been identified. In late 1965 an abandoned toddler was found wandering around a Newark, New Jersey store and was thought to be Paul Fronczak. There was no DNA testing available at the time to prove this definitively, but baby Paul’s parents accepted him as theirs and raised him.

In 2012, however, a DNA test established that this man was NOT actually the biological child of Mr. and Mrs. Fronczak. Not-Paul, as I call him, enlisted help from a genetic genealogist, and in 2015 he was identified. He and his twin sister were born into an abusive family, and shortly after they turned two, both twins disappeared and their three siblings were warned to never speak of them again. Their disappearances were never reported.

Not-Paul has published a book about all this, titled The Foundling: The True Story of a Kidnapping, a Family Secret, and My Search for the Real Me. I own a copy on Kindle but haven’t read it yet.)

Getting back to the report that the real Paul has been found… well, it’s been several days and there’s no further information released. Furthermore, that article I linked to above is the ONLY article I can find that talks about this alleged recovery. You’d think this would be explosive news that would make headlines all over the world, but nope.

Even if the actual Paul didn’t want his identity released, you’d think there’d still be something printed like “Paul now lives in a small town in Michigan and works as a Blank. He began having doubts about his origins because Reasons. His presumed abductor raised him as her own son and is now deceased. He would like his privacy respected at this time.” SOMETHING.

I’m beginning to wonder if this “recovery” was a hoax. Though, for what it’s worth, baby Paul isn’t listed on the NCMEC site anymore.

I really don’t know; the whole thing is very puzzling to me. Any ideas?

Lost at sea

So yesterday I added a case of six commercial fishermen who disappeared off the coast of Alaska when the fishing vessel Destination sank in 2017 with the loss of all hands on board. I think this was the largest “lost at sea” group of disappearances, and possibly the largest group of “lost/injured missing” people I’ve put up: Kai Jamal Hamik, Jeffrey Hathaway, Charles “Glenn” Jones, Lawrence Vincent “Larry” O’Grady, Darrik Monroe Seibold and Raymond Jay Vincler.

I also added Eric Lawrence Eder, an Alaska fisherman who fell off a fishing trawler off the coast of Alaska, and Angela Chingliak, whose body was never found after her boat sank in Goodnews Bay off the coast of Alaska.

I’m sure you’re sensing a pattern here. I got all those names off this list of missing persons in Alaska, which has 1,231 entries as of this writing. It’s just names and dates of disappearance, nothing else. The list of active missing persons bulletins, which has fliers with photos and the standard info, is much shorter. I has I think 117 people, unless I lost count.

Alaska DOES have a pretty high crime rate, but a lot of the missing persons on its list are only “missing” in a technical sense: their fates are known, and in many times so are their approximate whereabouts. They’re just on the lists in case their bodies turn up and need to be identified.

I’m not sure how far I’m willing to go with groups of lost/injured missing people. I mean, six is one thing, but I know there’s one ship that sunk in the Bering Sea and with like 45 people on board, almost all of whom perished, and they never found the bodies. I wouldn’t want to put up THAT group, and those 40-some people may very well be on that list of Alaska missings.

I guess it’s just a judgment call.

MP of the week: Jamal Mohammed

This week’s featured missing person is Jamal “James” Mohammed, a Tampa, Florida dance club owner who disappeared on October 17, 2007. I’ve got a pretty broad weight range for him, 145 to 220 pounds. From his photo (which, admittedly, only shows his face and neck) I’d be guessing he was at the lighter end.

He was last seen on his way to the club he owned. He was never seen again and his car turned up abandoned with some of his stuff inside. Foul play is suspected.

Technical difficulties the last few days

Yeah, so on Tuesday the internet pooped out right in the middle of an update. The combined efforts of me, Michael and my service provider’s tech support could accomplish nothing; we were all baffled. And so there was no internet for more than two days, which was rather awful. I could surf the web on my phone using data, but I could not update Charley, so no missing person of the week this week.

Late last night, with a service technician scheduled to come out today, Michael had a bright idea. He tried it, and poof! The internet works again!

I’m glad to be able to carry on again. Working on updates for today.

MP of the week: Kristi Krebs

This week’s featured missing person is Kristi Suzanne Krebs, a 22-year-old woman who disappeared from Fort Bragg, California on August 9, 1993. She had had one nervous breakdown before and may have suffered another that precipitated her disappearance.

Her car was found stuck in a creek in a state park, with no sign of her. Among the items left inside were her wallet and ID, as well as her undergarments — but not her other clothes. There’s been no sign of her since.

In other news, I’m feeling much better, nausea gone etc. And I’ve renewed my subscription to Ancestry till February so I can get photos from there; it’s an excellent resource for that. For example, I’ve found a photo of Howard Woolwine that I’ve replaced his previous photo with. Not only was the previous pic (supplied by the Virginia State Police missing persons listing) of very poor quality, but I’ve never been sure it was him; it appears to show a young black or Hispanic man, and Woolwine was an elderly white man.

The Ancestry subscription is expensive, $80 for just three months’ use, so I’m not sure how long I can continue to use it, but it’s mine till February.

I’ve been busy all day but hope I can get a proper update in tomorrow evening.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.

Saw doctor, got meds

So yesterday I saw the doctor and was given some medicine and they also did a blood draw to see if anything sketchy pops up in my lab work. I hope to be feeling better soon. Maybe I’ll actually get something done today.

In other news, I wanted to tell y’all about an app called Remini. It enhances old poor quality photos. I learned about it last night and tried it with an old family photo. So this was the original:

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and this was the result:

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And here’s a closeup of the face, before and after:

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I am very impressed and thought I should tell you guys because this could be a great tool for the missing persons world. You can do up to three photos a day for free; after that you must pay.