Flashback Friday: Nahida Khatib

This week’s Flashback Friday is Nahida Ahmed Khatib, who’s been missing from Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, a Milwaukee suburb, since October 1, 1976.

Born in British Mandate Palestine, raised in Lebanon, Nahida had married at sixteen and moved to the US with her husband Fahmi “Sam” Khatib. They were in the middle of a nasty divorce in 1976, but Nahida mysteriously disappeared midway through. Sam told their son his mother had walked out and abandoned him (wearing nothing but a bathrobe and fuzzy slippers), an opinion the police didn’t share.

It’s fairly obvious what happened here, but Fahmi is dead and presumably he took his secrets to the grave. I doubt we’ll ever find Nahida.

Make-a-List Monday: Special needs children

This list is of kids who were under 18 when they disappeared, who had serious medical conditions. I’m talking about the sort of thing that would have them frequently hospitalized and/or put in special education classes at school.

  1. Patrick Kennedy Alford Jr., 7 (ADHD and possibly emotional problems)
  2. Steven Eugene Anderson, 17 (moderately mentally disabled)
  3. Marble Ace Arvidson, 17 (behavioral problems, classified as a special needs child)
  4. Kevin Jay Ayotte, 3 (developmentally disabled, hearing-impaired and with limited speech skills)
  5. Nicholas Patrick Barclay, 13 (ADD)
  6. Allison Taylor Bayliss, 15 (Asperger’s Syndrome aka high-functioning autism)
  7. Emad Ali Ben-Mrad, 3 (hearing-impaired)
  8. Samuel Savage Becker Boehlke, 8 (Asperger’s Syndrome)
  9. Edward Dylan Bryant, 9 (ADHD)
  10. Fidelmar Liborio Cadenas, 10 months (unknown, but said to be “medically fragile”)
  11. Monica Cassandra Carrasco, 16 (anorexia and depression)
  12. Kevin Andrew McCarthy Collins, 10 (dyslexia)
  13. Cassie Kay Compton, 15 (possible bipolar disorder or depression)
  14. Jeremy Ray Coots, 4 (severely hearing-impaired)
  15. Carla Rebecca Corley, 14 (epilepsy)
  16. Chris Andrew Cunningham, 6 (seizures)
  17. Christopher Gage Daniel, 7 (unspecified, just says he’s classified as a special needs child)
  18. Mark Anthony Degner, 12 (developmentally delayed with bipolar disorder)
  19. Landon Lee Deriggi, 13 (severely hyperactive, visually impaired and learning-disabled)
  20. Adji Desir, 6 (severely mentally disabled and almost completely nonverbal)
  21. Christian Taylor Ferguson, 9 (severely physically and mentally disabled due to a prior stroke, needs life-sustaining medication)
  22. Andrea R. Gonzalez, 5 (severe emotional and behavorial problems)
  23. David Eduardo Gosnell, 3 (developmentally delayed)
  24. Ember Skye Graham, 6 months (epilepsy)
  25. Kenneth Warren Hager, 11 (mentally disabled and mute, severe epilepsy)
  26. Jyrine Kyese Harris, 2 (ostogensis imperfecta, aka brittle bones)
  27. Justin Phillip Harris, 13 (mentally disabled and cannot function without psychiatric medication)
  28. Bryan Andrew Hayes, 13 (developmentally delayed with bipolar disorder)
  29. James P. Higham III, 16 (mentally disabled with developmental and emotional issues)
  30. Mark Joseph Himebaugh, 11 (emotionally disturbed with behavioral problems and possible OCD)
  31. James Richard Howell, 9 (hyperactive)
  32. Elisabeth Ann Huster, 9 (hyperactive)
  33. John Christopher Inman, 17 (seizures)
  34. Danny Randall Jackson, 12 (ADHD)
  35. Tiahease Tiawanna Jackson, 10 (diabetes, high blood pressure, a kidney disorder and learning disabilities)
  36. Hevin Dakota James Lee Jenkins, 2 (autistic and nonverbal)
  37. Shanta Marie Johnson, 3 (exposed to cocaine in utero; classified as a special needs child)
  38. Lenoria Eleise Anne Jones, 3 (exposed to cocaine in utero, had ADHD)
  39. Barry James Kephart II, 11 (dyslexia)
  40. Adam Benjamin Lake, 17 (Crohn’s Disease)
  41. Patricia Ann LeBlanc, 15 (“unspecified condition that may endanger her welfare”)
  42. Marjorie Christina Luna, 8 (hearing-impaired)
  43. Louis Anthony MacKerley, 7 (hyperactive and learning-disabled)
  44. Dennis Lloyd Martin, 6 (learning-disabled and slightly developmentally delayed)
  45. Tiana Neshelle Martin, 10 (Graves Disease, a potentially fatal autoimmune disorder)
  46. Ashley Renee Martinez, 15 (bipolar disorder)
  47. Clayton Lynn McCarter, 15 (mentally disabled)
  48. Betty McCullough, 10 (deaf and mute, and said to be terminally ill though I’m not sure why)
  49. Alexandra Marie McIntire, 7 months (premature, developmentally delayed, lung problems)
  50. Brandy Lynn Myers, 13 (brain damage)
  51. Tristen Alan Myers, 4 (severe behavioral problems, possibly had ADD, was possibly mentally disabled)
  52. Amy Sue Pagnac, 13 (seizures and possibly bipolar disorder)
  53. William Fred Patient, 16 (ADHD, bipolar disorder and substance abuse issues)
  54. Larry Wayne Perry, 9 (moderately mentally disabled)
  55. Robert Thomas Pillsen-Rahier, 15 (behavioral and emotional problems)
  56. Bianca Noel Piper, 13 (ADHD and severe bipolar disorder)
  57. Angelo Gene Puglisi, 10 (epilepsy)
  58. Blake Wade Pursley, 14 (seizures, partial paralysis, and learning and behavioral problems)
  59. Eric Wayne Pyles, 12 (severe emotional and behavioral problems)
  60. Jaliek L. Rainwalker, 13 (severe emotional and behavioral problems including reactive attachment disorder, exposed to cocaine and alcohol in utero, can be violent)
  61. Natasha Marie Shanes, 6 (epilepsy, developmentally delayed)
  62. Jason Sims Jr., 15 (said to be autistic and nonverbal)
  63. Austin William Sparks, 15 (severe emotional problems)
  64. Roland Jack Spencer III, 3 (mentally disabled, hearing-impaired, can’t really walk, seizures)
  65. Aleacia Di’onne Stancil, 9 months (premature, born addicted to drugs)
  66. Brandi Jondell Summers, 5 (cystic fibrosis)
  67. Amber Jean Swartz-Garcia, 7 (hearing-impaired)
  68. Ricky Lane Thomas Jr., 13 (severe behavior problems, could be violent)
  69. Wilfredo Torres (learning disability)
  70. Daffany Sherika Tullos, 7 (epilepsy)
  71. Alissa Marie Turney, 17 (ADHD)
  72. David Clayton Warner, 12 (epilepsy)
  73. Brittany Renee Williams, 7 (AIDS)
  74. David Edward Williams, 13 (mentally disabled and has seizures)
  75. Fredrick James Workman, 15 (ADHD and ODD — that is, oppositional defiant disorder)
  76. Daniel Ted Yuen, 16 (depression and other emotional problems)

Make-a-List Monday: Family abductions of kids who are now adults

This list is for kids who were abducted by parents or other relatives, and are now over the age of 18. In some of these cases, the MP has siblings who were abducted also and are still minors. Many of these children have been missing for a depressingly long time. I did not include cases where they believe the abductor killed the child after taking them.

I should emphasize that just because the kid is now an adult and still hasn’t resurfaced doesn’t mean they want to stay missing or were fleeing an abusive situation. Many times children are lied to by the abductor and told that their left-behind parent is dead, or that the left-behind parent was an abusive, horrible person and they’re better off without them.

Many victims of family abduction are young, below school age, and thus they wouldn’t have much, if any, memories of their former life. Even in cases of older children, it’s still possible to poison their minds against the left-behind parent. You have to consider the idea that children want to believe their parents have their best interests at heart. Especially in a situation where they have no other influences, it can be easy to convince them of things that are not true and alienate them against the other parent.

There’s also the issue of international abduction cases where the child/children were taken to a country (such as, say, Saudi Arabia) where women are not allowed to travel without the permission of a male relative. So, even if they wanted to come back, they can’t.

There is one case I know of where a girl was abducted by her father and taken to Mexico. She was very young at the time and her father told her that her mother was dead or had abandoned her, I can’t remember which. I don’t even remember her name. When the girl was 17, I guess her father’s conscience had been bothering him because he finally told her the truth about what happened, that he had stolen her from her mother and that her mother was alive and looking for her. The girl then traveled to the United States and eventually did locate her mother.

This happened like ten years ago — I know because remember writing about it on Websleuths and I haven’t been active on there in ages. I wrote that I was glad that the father owned up to what he had done and gave his daughter a chance to reunite with her searching mother. Other posters on the forum were angry at him, saying “I can’t believe you’re defending this man, he did something horrible.” Well, I wasn’t exactly defending him, and I freely admit that yes, he did do something horrible. But at least he eventually tried to do right by his daughter and his ex-wife, which is more than can be said for most abductors in such cases.

  1. Jehad Ahmed Abuhamda (was 13, is now 18)
  2. Berania Teresa Agapito (was 11, is now 18)
  3. Wendy Agapito (was 14, now 20)
  4. Gloria Aguilar (was 13, now 21)
  5. Amina Ashraf Al-Jailani (was 9, is now 20)
  6. Layla Ashraf Al-Jailani (was 7, now 18)
  7. Sarah Molouk Amiri (was 3, now 26)
  8. Cameron Jeffrey Anderson (was 12, now 28)
  9. Kyle Nicholas James Anderson (was 9, now 25)
  10. Rachel Marie Anderson (was 13, now 30)
  11. Yareli Marlem Barajas (was 12, now 19)
  12. Anastacia Marie Argentova-Stevens (was 5, now 19)
  13. Emad Ali Ben-Mrad (was 3, now 19)
  14. Shoshana Kaila Black (was 2, now 22)
  15. Reuben Bennett Blackwell II (was 2, now 23)
  16. Halle Patricia Bobo (was 6, now 18)
  17. Jacob Allen Bobo (was 9, now 20)
  18. Ebrahim Bozorgi (was 6, now 23)
  19. Zafar Bozorgi (was 1, now 19)
  20. Miranda Elaine Budiman (was 4, now 22)
  21. Angela Estella Burns (was 1, now 21)
  22. Natasha Alexandra Augusta Carter (was 10, now 26)
  23. Brittani Nicole Dolbear (was 3, now 22; today is her birthday)
  24. Olivia Addison Edwards-Tuttle (was 8 months, now 26)
  25. Sarah Raquel Elsafi (was 9, now 18)
  26. Tariq Ahmed Elsafi (was 12, now 26)
  27. Joseph Zachary Ernst (was 10, now 18)
  28. Marcus Antonio Farina (was 9 months, now 25)
  29. David Eduardo Gosnell (was 3, now 21)
  30. Antonia Guerrero (was 12, now 23)
  31. Stephanie Guerrero (was 13, now 24; tomorrow is her birthday)
  32. Austin Cole Hernandez (was 4 months, now 20)
  33. Ethan James Hernandez (was 2, now 18)
  34. Leonid Jacobson (was 3, now 21)
  35. Jesse Robert Kaslov (was 1, now 19)
  36. Jewel Koranteng (was 2, now 19)
  37. Mario Lopez* (was 6, now 18)
  38. Sandra Lopez (was 11, now 21)
  39. Sarah Anne Lord (was 3, now 22)
  40. Bianca Isabella Lozano (was 1, now 23)
  41. Ezra Lok Lui (was 2, now 19)
  42. Brandon Mema (was 2, now 18)
  43. Ray Preston Morrison IV (was 2, now 21)
  44. Diana Judith Portillo (was 12, now 18)
  45. Soomaiiah Jalaaluddeen Quariishi (was 7, now 23)
  46. Kyle Ivor Rae (was 2, now 22)
  47. Melissa Erin Reiter (was 1, now 25)
  48. Andrea Michelle Reyes (was 1, now 19)
  49. Alejandra Rivera-Romero (was 8, now 20)
  50. Wesley Rivera-Romero (was 6, now 18)
  51. Nadia Rougebianni (was 2, now 18)
  52. Stacy Ann Kathleen Rudolph (was 13, now 29; today is her birthday)
  53. Isabella Saileanu (was 2, now 18)
  54. Domingo Sanchez Gonzalez (was 11, now 19)
  55. Esmit Sanchez Gonzalez (was 15, now 23)
  56. Deborah Lyyn Sanders (was 1, now 34)
  57. Nicolas Marcel Santin (was 12, now 23)
  58. Emily Michelle Sawyer (was 3, now 33)
  59. Adam Osama Shannon (was 4, now 19)
  60. Kamelia Maria Spencer (was 2, now 19)
  61. Caroline Victoria Teague (was 4, now 19)
  62. Bethany Maria Tiner (was 3, now 23)
  63. Gabrielle Torres (was 12, now 21)
  64. Vivian Aileen Trout (was 2, now 22)
  65. Therese Rose Vanderheiden-Walsh (was 5, now 32)
  66. Prathima Venkatesan (was 8, now 18)
  67. Charles Jason Vosseler (was 3, now 33)
  68. William Martin Vosseler (was 2, now 32)
  69. Brianna Christine Warnes (was 2, now 23)
  70. Takoda Tei Weed (was 6, now 18)
  71. Tiffany Susan Westford (was 2, now 25)
  72. Kelly Ann Yates (was 10 months, now 32)
  73. Kimberly Ann Yates (was 3, now 35)
  74. Christopher Louis Zaharias (was 3, now 32)
  75. Lisa Mae Zaharias (was 1, now 30)

*Mario’s case was probably a family abduction; at least it stands to reason that it was. He and his three siblings were in foster care, with Mario and Joel placed in the same home, and the boys vanished together and their biological parents disappeared at the same time. (Mario’s brother has since been found.) He’s still classified as “endangered missing” though, and I don’t think warrants have been issued for his parents.

 

An idea about APs

I first thought of this issue a few years ago, but I don’t think I’ve discussed it on this blog before. So I thought I’d bring it up and see what y’all think about it.

And a disclaimer: I’m doing my best to write things in a non-offensive way and to make sure my facts are correct, but I don’t know much about the Muslim world at all, so if I mess up, I’m sorry. If I’m wrong about something, feel free to call me out on it.

(Recently, on a chat app my phone, I spoke to a guy who grew up in Saudi Arabia and now lives in the UK. I had never spoken to a Saudi person in my life. I said, “I’ve heard X, Y and Z about Saudi Arabia, are those things true?” He confirmed they were and said I was, for an American, “surprisingly well-informed” about Saudi Arabia. Which is really depressing when you think about it because I don’t know much about the country at all. I can name three cities there: Mecca, Medina, and Jeddah. The first two I know about only because they’re famous in the history of Islam, the third I know about only because I read a novel set there. So it’s not that I am well-informed about Saudi Arabia or Muslim issues at all, it’s just that everyone else knows even less than I do. In a blind world, the one-eyed man is king. But moving right along…)

I have an idea about APs for a very specific subset of people: Muslim girls who were taken by a non-custodial parent and are believed to be now living in a Muslim-majority country where the girls and women generally wear some form of the hijab.

I don’t know much about the hijab, but I know there are different types of covering and in a few countries (like Saudi Arabia) women are legally required to wear them, and in other countries it’s just sort of the done thing, a cultural expectation to dress in this way. But I’m not trying to talk about whether a Muslim girl or woman should or should not wear the hijab. What I’m actually thinking is this:

In the countries I’m talking about, the girls and women will usually wear, at minimum, a scarf on their head, and in most cases the scarf covers most or all of their hair. They’ll wear this pretty much all the time they’re out in public. So why, when the NCMEC makes APs for these girls, do they not show that scarf?

Sarah Molouk Amiri, for example, is believed to be in Iran, where the hijab is required by law and just about every female wears some form of head covering even if it doesn’t completely conceal their hair. My Google image search for “Iranian women” turned up a lot of photos of women in various scarves; many of these women wore scarves that covered most or all of their hair, and also their neck up to the chin. Yet Sarah’s latest AP (done four years ago) shows her wearing no headscarf, and her entire neck and parts of her collarbone were also uncovered in the picture. I find it hard to believe that a woman living in Iran, even a super-modern cosmopolitan city girl, would ever dress that way in public. Wouldn’t it be more helpful to show an AP of Sarah dressed in the clothing worn by the females of the country where she’s supposed to be?

And that’s just one example. There are many family abduction cases where the girls are thought to be living in countries where some form of hijab is commonly worn in public. And the NCMEC, when it makes APs for them, NEVER shows them in Islamic clothing. One time, years ago, do an AP of a missing girl who was supposedly in Pakistan, and it did show her wearing a headscarf, which is what made me suddenly realize that this was an issue. They never made another one like it, and when they updated this particular girl’s AP a few years later, the scarf disappeared.

The obvious counter-argument to the “have them wear a scarf in the picture” is that it’s necessary for the APs to show the girls’ hair and neck etc., so we can better see what they look like. And also that if they added a scarf to the picture, people would be distracted by it and be focusing on the scarf rather than the girl/woman’s face.

But the thing is, if they’re living in a country where the hijab is required by law or where nearly all women wear some form of it, literally no one in public is going to see these girls’ hair and neck and collarbones and what have you. So it doesn’t help show what the girl looks like. As for distracting from the focus on the girl’s face, you could argue that, if, say, an Iranian person was looking at Sarah Amiri’s AP, that person might get distracted by the exposed hair and neck and collarbone.

Anyway… So what do you think of my idea? I’m especially interested in hearing from any Muslims in the audience.

Thinking aloud writing today’s updates

Laurie Lynn Bradshaw: *Googles the name of the guy driving her car* Weird…no sign of him on the internet at all. The article saying they can’t find him is from August 1987. I wonder if he ever did turn up?

Joanne Long Fugett: The date of birth given on this obituary would match Joanne’s age; this is probably her. I’ve seen such notices for MPs who have been declared legally dead. But why would Joanne get declared legally dead just seven months after her disappearance?

Donna Kay Gibson: My God, if someone abducted this poor woman (which looks likely) when she had laryngitis… She wouldn’t even been able to scream for help.

Miller Smith Harlow: This is a strange case. It looks like it must have been foul play, but why? Who would want to kill this harmless, likable retiree?

Abdallah Ahmed Hassan and Barkad Ilyas Hassan: Weird, two guys with the same surname disappear from the same city just two weeks apart. Probably not related though. Hassan is a really common Muslim name. Abdallah was apparently Somali. I wonder if Barkad and his friend Hamza Okie were too? The photos all look like passport-type pics.

Francisco Arroya Hernandez: The Virginia State Police page mistakenly calls him “Franciso” and then refers to him as “Francisco” in the text of the document; I wonder if “Arroya” is also a mistake and it’s supposed to be “Arroyo.”

From the VSP page also, La-Teasha LaMone Brooks and Heather Dialian Hodges have one new photo each.

MP of the week: Amira Mubarak

The featured missing person for this week is Amira Farooq Mubarak, an eleven-month-old girl who was abducted from Manhattan by her non-custodial father on August 5, 2000. I think Amira is breathtakingly cute in those photos. Those big, bright brown eyes are stunning. My dear friend Annie Keller’s site For the Lost, which is a great resource for family abduction cases especially, has a little bit more info than I do in its profile for Amira. It says she and her father may be traveling a green 1992 Lexus and may be in either Canada or in Pakistan. Her father, Muhammad Farooq Butt, is of Pakistani descent, though I don’t know if he was actually born there. I’ll have to update her case with the For the Lost info.

I really hope Amira is in Canada and not Pakistan, which is one of the poorest nations in the world and not a great place for girls. Although marriage is illegal in Pakistan for girls under 16 and boys under 18, child marriage for girls is pretty common regardless, and a proposed law raising the marriageable age to 18 for both sexes was roundly rejected in 2014. Pakistan’s Council of Islamic Ideology believes that girls as young as 9 ought to be allowed to marry in some cases. Honor killing is also an issue there.

Amira is now 16. Her case is one of the older family abduction cases on Charley, and as she was less than a year old at the time of her abduction, she won’t remember her mother or other left-behind relatives. Who knows what, if anything, she’s been told about them. I hope she’s happy and healthy, wherever she is, and I hope she will be reunited with her searching family someday. Perhaps social media can help. I know of many cases where searching parents have found their lost children on Facebook and have been able to at least start a relationship with them.