Articles about other kids in the wake of Jayme’s recovery

As often happens when a high-profile missing child is found, especially when they’re found safe, news agencies are dusting off their local missing kid cases and being all like, “Hey, you know how Jayme Closs was found? Here’s some kids missing in YOUR area and their parents hope they’ll get found too.” So far we’ve got:

I highly doubt Adji or Diana is alive. Adji is a special needs child and if he was abducted, I don’t think the abductor could have kept him long without attracting some attention. As for Diana, a suspect has been charged with her murder.

Native American Heritage Month: Ricarda Tillman-Locket

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Ricarda Tillman-Locket, a 22-year-old woman who disappeared from Memphis, Tennessee on February 19, 2007. She is of mixed Native and African-American descent and was born on the Winnebago Reservation, but I don’t know her tribal status.

Ricarda, or Rica as she was nicknamed, was estranged from her husband, Lou Lockett, at the time of her disappearance and living in a domestic violence shelter with their infant son. I suppose it goes without saying that Lou, who was the last person known to have seen her, is considered a suspect in her disappearance.

That concludes Native American Heritage Month. I’ll probably be back for more next year.

MP of the week: Latrice Armstead

This week’s featured missing person is Latrice Shay Armstead, a 38-year-old woman who disappeared from Memphis, Tennessee on July 28, 2012. A few days later, her car was found abandoned and burned in Clarksdale, Mississippi.

It seems likely that Armstead’s estranged husband was behind her disappearance. They were in the process of a divorce and she had a restraining order against him, but he was seen twice with her on the day she disappeared.

Pride Month: Charles Toliver

In honor of Pride Month I’m featuring a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer missing person every day for the month of June. Today’s case is Charles Lee Toliver, a gay man who disappeared from Oak Ridge, Tennessee on February 4, 2000. He was 30 years old.

Toliver’s disappearance is suspicious and his former roommate seems pretty sketchy, but it’s really not clear what happened.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Soon Hwang

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Soon Chon Hwang, a 44-year-old businessman who disappeared from Memphis, Tennessee on September 5, 2006. He owned a grocery store there.

Hwang was at a wholesale grocery shopping, presumably buying stuff to resell at his own store, when he got a call and left in a hurry, leaving his shopping behind. He was never seen again and his truck was found in West Memphis, Arkansas (just over the state border, about twelve minutes from Memphis) that same day.

I couldn’t find any news about this case; the only thing I could find was some court filing where Hwang was listed as a defendant in a lawsuit. The document notes that the sheriff couldn’t serve him because he’d been “missing F/2 yrs.” In fact, by then he’d been missing for three and a half years.

Sweeeeeet….

I have stumbled across a new collection of MP cases, put together by the National Park Service. This list is by no means exhaustive, I’m sure, but it’s a start, and I see several names I don’t recognize, as well as nuggets of information I didn’t have for cases already on Charley.

For example, it turns out that Trenny Lynn Gibson‘s real name is Teresa. Who knew? Even the NCMEC lists her as Trenny.

Anyway: woo! I hope they keep it current.

Select It Sunday: Cayce Lynn McDaniel

Bridget B. asked me to profile Cayce Lynn McDaniel‘s case for Select It Sunday; the 21st anniversary of her disappearance was last month. She was fourteen when she disappeared from Milan, Tennessee on August 16, 1996. She attended a church party and then someone dropped her off at home, which was unoccupied at the time. Cayce’s mom arrived home in the early hours of the next morning and found her daughter gone. She had had time to change clothes, grab some milk and cookies and turn on the TV before she disappeared.

I did a search and found this 2017 article about the case, but it doesn’t say anything new. A 2010 article says the police believe Cayce is dead.