National Hispanic Heritage Month: Meredith Medina

(I had pre-written cases for September 30 and October 1, using the app on my phone. I didn’t realize until very late on October 1 that neither of them went up, and in fact they seem to have vanished. I need to stop using that app to try to write entries; it never seems to work well. I am trying to reconstruct the entries from memory.)

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Meredith Ann Medina, a sixteen-year-old girl who disappeared from Midwest City, Oklahoma on February 14, 1989. She may go by the nickname Mere or her middle name, Ann.

She’s classified as a runaway, and I don’t know anything else about her disappearance. However, it’s worth noting that Meredith’s stepmother, Nancy Jean Medina, also disappeared without a trace in the 1980s, four and a half years before Meredith did.

It could be just a coincidence that there are two women missing from the same family. Certainly I’ve seen numerous cases of multiple people in a family disappearing in completely unrelated instances. It is odd, though.

If still alive, Meredith is now 46 years old, 47 late this month.

Black History Month: Terrence Haney

In honor of Black History Month I’m profiling one African-American MP every day on this blog for the month of February. Today’s case is Terrence Lee Haney, age 36, who disappeared from Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 2, 2001.

I don’t have very many details, just that he apparently disappeared somewhere in the two-block distance between his sister’s home and his own. Foul play is suspected.

Terrence Haney is related by marriage to another missing black man, Edward Larnell Martin, who disappeared from Tulsa in 1999. No apparent connection, though. Just a lot of bad luck there.

Native American Heritage Month: Kimberly Mullens

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Kimberly Doreen Mullens, a 33-year-old woman who disappeared from Tulsa, Oklahoma on June 1, 1998. I don’t know her tribe.

The circumstances of her disappearance are suspicious, as she was in an abusive marriage. Her husband said she simply left him after an argument, but that’s the kind of story we hear a lot.

MP of the week: Timur Mardeyev

This week’s featured missing person is Timur Mardeyev, a 27-year-old man who disappeared from Tulsa, Oklahoma on November 29, 2011.

Mardeyev was born and raised in Kazakhstan, which is in central Asia, but it looks like he’s ethnically Russian; Kazakhstan was part of the Soviet Union. Mardeyev was a recent immigrant; he moved to the U.S. the same year he disappeared and lived with relatives. He had a fiancee in Russia and they planned to settle in Tulsa after the marriage.

It looks like something terrible happened to him. From his GPS we know he didn’t drive his usual route. The GPS has the car visiting two casinos, and when it found abandoned in a parking lot:

Mardeyev’s keys were in the ignition and his GPS system and expensive sunglasses were inside the car, along with a bottle of Coke and an open bottle of whiskey. His Bible and some paperwork he was filling out for his visa were missing.

There was gravel in the front and back seats of the car, which is uncharacteristic of Mardeyev; he kept his vehicle very clean. The car’s money change compartment had been cleaned out and the radio was tuned to a rap station; Mardeyev listened only to CDs or a Russian-language station. In addition, the driver’s seat was pulled too far forward for a person of Mardeyev’s height.

Furthermore, although he was carrying a lot of cash, perhaps as much as $5,000, his family said he was frugal and not the kind of person who would have gone to a casino. The casino had no surveillance cameras (seems odd to me that they didn’t) so no one knows whether Mardeyev actually went there and left his car there.

Native American Heritage Month: Dawn Nakedhead

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Dawn Michelle Nakedhead, a sixteen-year-old girl who disappeared from Fort Gibson, Oklahoma on October 18, 1991. (I had her middle name misspelled as “Mechelle.” It’s corrected now.) I do not know her tribe.

Dawn has a very large family and lived with her aunt, Joyce Green, at the time of her disappearance. It’s pretty common for Native American children to live with extended family members. She was last seen using the phone at a convenience store. She was going to stay the night with a friend in nearby Muskogee, but I guess she never arrived at her friend’s house.

Mystery U did a piece on Dawn in September; it includes an age-progression they made. The circumstances of her disappearance are unclear. Sadly, her mother, Lorene, died in 2017 without ever learning what happened to her, and at least one of her brothers is also deceased.

A long-ago disappearance and a repressed memory

I wrote up the case of Maxine Beatrice Green last night. The details, if true, are pretty horrifying. According to Maxine’s daughter Norma, her ex-husband, Hobart, raped Maxine and beat and strangled her to death and buried her body in a river bottom.

The problem with Norma’s story is that she says she repressed the memory and it only came back to her 25 years after the fact, and she has exactly zero hard evidence to support it.

That Norma herself believes the murder happened is evident in the fact that, after the police wouldn’t listen to her, she used her own money to have the alleged burial site excavated. That Hobart murdered his wife I can also well believe; he was a demonstrably violent man who later beat his baby son to death and buried the body on his farm.

But nothing turned up at Norma’s excavation site except a few buttons and some animal bones. They should have found at least Maxine’s purse, or part of it, or some of the contents of it, as Norma remembers the purse being buried with her mother.

It’s possible, I suppose, that every part of Norma’s story is correct EXCEPT the burial site. But I have some other questions:

  1. What about Norma’s sister, who was also alleged to be present at the murder and burial? What is she saying? How old was she at the time; was she old enough to remember any of this?
  2. What about Hobart’s girlfriend, who was also said to have been there? She is unnamed in the news articles. Does Norma know her identity, and was she ever interviewed?
  3. Maxine and Hobart had four other children. Where were they on the night in question, and do they remember anything?

I think Hobart must be dead by now. I can find no record of his death, but he’d be nearly 90 today and I can’t find him listed as an inmate in the Missouri Department of Corrections database.

Given how old the case is, and how Hobart was already in prison for life, I can understand that the police were reluctant to invest a lot of resources in this. But six children grew up with their mother, and it would be nice to know why, and where she is now.

Reader discretion advised

So here’s a copy of the court filing in the Ashley Freeman/Lauria Bible case. It is horrific. I haven’t even read it yet myself and I know it’s going to be horrific.

I did glance at the first few pages and it looks like the sole living suspect, Ronnie Busick, was the lookout and two men who are beyond earthly justice actually killed Danny and Kathy Freeman. And of course, if Busick and his lawyer have any brains at all they’re going to dump as much blame as possible on the dead guys and paint him as an innocent bystander or something.

I had bad dreams last night about the girls being held captive by those men. Some real Silence of the Lambs type stuff.

Not gonna update today. I’ve been out all day and now I’ve got some things to do. I’ve got to deal with an email sent in with about a zillion corrections on one of my cases. And possibly take Michael to the hospital when he gets home, depending on how awful he feels. He’s been sick for awhile.