National Hispanic Heritage Month: Ann Lombard

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Ann Lombard, aka Ana Lombard or Auriana Taylor, who disappeared from Placitas, New Mexico on April 29, 1996. She was 31.

It sounds likely that Ann was murdered by her live-in boyfriend, James Taylor, who claims she just left him. I’ll let the casefile tell more:

He and Lombard had a troubled relationship. In 1990, Lombard accused Taylor of holding her down and burning her on a stove. In 1992, one of Lombard’s children claimed he saw Taylor rape his mother and spray chemicals in her face.

Taylor was seen digging a large hole in his front yard the day after Lombard vanished. He asked a neighbor for digging equipment to repair a leaky septic tank. Police searched the yard when they learned about this, but the search turned up no evidence.

In 2002, Taylor allegedly choked his wife and threatened to “kill her like he did Ann.” In 2010, he was arrested at his Des Moines, Iowa home after a five-hour police standoff; he’d called 911 to say he was armed, poured gasoline all over his house and threatened to set it on fire. He has never been charged in Lombard’s case due to a lack of evidence.

Sounds like a real great guy, Taylor. I hope he gets what’s coming to him.

Ann Lombard left behind seven children. If still alive today, she’d be 56.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Nina Herron

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Nina Brenda Herron, who disappeared from Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 14, 2005. She was 21 years old.

Nina is one of MANY women missing from Albuquerque. Eleven victims between the ages of fifteen and thirty-two (and one fetus) were found in a mass grave in the desert on the West Mesa; those murders remain unsolved. Many of other women remain missing, however, and it’s unclear whether their disappearances are tied to the West Mesa murders.

If still alive, Nina would now be 35.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Trinidad Alcantar

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Trinidad Alcantar, a 55-year-old man who disappeared from Las Cruces, New Mexico on February 2, 2007. He had an unspecified mental condition requiring medication, which he didn’t take when he left.

Alcantar’s wife thought he might be having an affair with another woman. Police talked to the alleged mistress, who admitted she knew him and claimed he’d been abused by his family. She said she didn’t know where he was but thought maybe Mexico. Alcantar’s relatives suggested Deming, a town sixty miles west of Las Cruces, as a possible new residence for him.

I don’t think he was in Deming. It’s not a big town, and the cops weren’t able to locate him there. In 2016, nine years after his disappearance, the police put out an appeal to find him, but it was fruitless. He’s still listed as missing.

All accounts indicate Alcantar left on his own and doesn’t seem to want to return. It would be nice if he could be taken off the missing persons register, though, and the police can only do that when they find him. If he wants to get in touch with the cops, by law they’re not allowed to tell anyone his whereabouts.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Carmen Gonzalez

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month I’m featuring a Hispanic missing person every day from September 15 to October 15. Today’s case is Carmen Marta Gonzalez, a 37-year-old woman who disappeared from Santa Fe, New Mexico, a popular tourist town, on New Years’ Eve, 2000.

She checked into a Day’s Inn, intending to stay one night, but never checked out and was never seen again. Her van (which she was supposed to return to the rental company on December 30) turned up in “a snow-filled canyon” in the Sangre De Cristo Mountains, which is a range in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico.

As far as I can determine, the spot where the van was found isn’t too far from Santa Fe. Just what Carmen was doing in Santa Fe is unclear; it’s possible she planned to spend the New Year there, or she may have been thinking of moving to the area. She’s originally from Puerto Rico and worked as a nurse at a hospital on the on the Zuni Indian Reservation.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Girly Hossencofft

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I am profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP for every day of the month of May. Today’s case is Girly Chew Hossencofft, a 36-year-old woman born and raised in Malaysia who moved to the U.S. in the early nineties, after meeting and marrying an American, Daizien Hossencofft.

She disappeared from Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 9, 1999. By this time, she and Daizien were in the process of a divorce, as Girly had tired of his infidelity and domestic abuse.

Daizien pleaded guilty to Girly’s murder in 2002 and was sentenced to life plus 61 years in prison. He testified at the trial of his mistress, Linda Henning, who was also accused of the murder. It was a memorable trial to say the least, as Daizien said under oath that he was “a reptilian shape-shifter and capable of being in several places at one time.” He claimed Henning was innocent, but she was convicted anyway and got 73 years.

Girly’s body has never been found. Daizien implied that it was cannibalized.

Native American Heritage Month: Wilson Happy

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Wilson Happy, a 68-year-old Navajo man who disappeared from Farmington, New Mexico on June 4, 2008. Unfortunately the only photo I have of him is from the 1960s and is, I think, a high school graduation photo; he’s wearing a mortarboard in it.

From the circumstances of his disappearance, it looks like he may have been robbed and murdered. He withdrew $2k from the bank and was last seen sitting in a parked car (he didn’t own a car btw) looking really nervous and as if he expected someone to be coming.

Native American Heritage Month: Betty Claw

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Betty Ann Claw, a 49-year-old woman who disappeared from Farmington, New Mexico in 1996. November 28, Thanksgiving Day, was the last day anyone in her family saw her. I don’t know her tribal information.

For some reason, Betty Claw is not listed on the New Mexico state missing persons database. Her case got some media attention early this year when local outlets published articles appealing for information, but there isn’t a whole lot out there.

If still alive, Betty Claw would be in her seventies now.