A cluster of resolves

Sometimes it seems like I don’t get a resolved case for a month and then suddenly get hit with a dozen at once. This next update will have five. So far. I’m linking to their casefiles but they won’t be up for much longer.

  • Runaway Sualee Jeseenia Gonzalez Castro has been found alive, per NCMEC. She had been missing for two years and almost two months and is now 19 years old.
  • Runaway Alondra Hernandez-Trujillo has also been found alive, per NCMEC. She had been missing for almost three years. She is now 18.
  • Convicted murderer Thomas Riffenburg has confessed to the killings of his girlfriend, Jennifer Anne Walsh, and their son, Alexander Mitchell Riffenburg, who had been missing from Palmdale, California since January 9, 2009. Jennifer was 23 and Alexander was only a year old. This article provides a lot of background info about their cases, more than I have on Charley. Thomas provided hand-drawn maps to where he’d buried their bodies, and the cops found remains and are awaiting DNA confirmation of their identities. I think I’ll resolve their cases now; it’s highly unlikely they’re anyone but Jennifer and Alexander.
  • A skull found in the woods 2001 has been identified as Ella Mae Williams, an 80-year-old woman with Alzheimer’s Disease who wandered from her Gainesville, Florida home on March 25, 1990. (The article incorrectly gives her age as 78.)
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Thinking aloud in today’s updates

  1. This may be setting some kind of record in how many murder-without-a-body cases were included in a single day’s update: there are seven here (or five if you want to get picky). I’ve got John Charles Cizek, Marcia Ann Forsberg, Hoggle siblings Jacob and Sarah, Donna Mae Jokumsen, and Lyon sisters Katherine and Sheila.
  2. The info I added to Marcia Forsberg’s page came from one of those “keep in touch with your high school class” type sites. In her profile on the page, Marcia talks about how happy she is in her marriage to her husband, described as her “soul mate and best friend” and “the love of my life.” Little knowing that the love of her life would, by his own admission, kill and dismember her a couple of years later. That’s hella depressing to read.
  3. Why is the NCMEC using Photograph 1 of Cynthia Bravo on their poster for her when Photograph 2 (via CDOJ) is so much better quality?
  4. I wonder if it’s significant that Cynthia disappeared just before her birthday. In Hispanic communities there’s something called the quinceanera or the fiesta de quince años, where there’s a massive party on a girl’s fifteenth birthday and she dresses up in a fancy formal dress, something like a prom dress or a wedding dress; it’s a rite of passage celebrating the girl’s transition from childhood to womanhood. Cynthia is Hispanic and vanished just one day before she would have turned fifteen. Just a thought.
  5. Another question/thought about Cynthia: who the heck runs away with no shoes on?

Not sure what to do with this one

CDOJ has got a case in their database that puzzles me: one “Anuradha Fnu“, missing from Fremont, California on March 24, 2015.

The thing is, I’m quite sure that’s not her name. The letters “FNU” are used on official documents in this country to stand for “Family Name Unknown.”

I Googled “Anuradha” and that seems to be a common first name in India. That makes sense for this woman; CDOJ says she’s Indian.

I tried Googling “Fnu India” in hopes of discovering that “Fnu” was also a real Indian name, but nope. Instead I found this page written by this poor sap who moved from India to the U.S. only to have his surname mistakenly listed as Fnu on all his documents. (His real surname was listed as part of his first name.) He wrote his story to tell other people in the same situation how to correct the mistake.

I don’t know whether I should just put this woman up on Charley as “Anuradha Fnu” or whether I should just list her as “Anuradha” and explain that her last name isn’t available.

Thoughts, anyone?

Muttergrumble, etc.

Yeah, so I was writing up the Runaway Of The Day and discovered that she is quite active on social media; her Facebook page, for example, says she was at a KFC in Niagara Falls (on the Canadian side) yesterday, and she was complaining about the wait there. So I called the NCMEC hotline to tell them this (they’re actually in my cell phone contacts), only to be told that the girl had been recovered ages ago.

Well, she’s still on their database, and I wasted some time writing up a casefile for a girl who’s not missing. At least I caught the error before POSTING said casefile.

And speaking of the NCMEC, what the heck’s up with Shimeaka Gibson? Her NCMEC poster mentions that she wears wigs but inexplicably fails to bring up the fact that she wears them because she’s completely bald, having lost her hair because of lupus. They don’t even have a “may be in need of medical attention” thing on her poster. I had to find out the baldness and lupus things from NamUs. But they’re awfully important details if you ask me. Baldness in a teenage girl is a major distinguishing characteristic, and lupus is a serious disease that can kill you.

Sigh.

A word about Shannon McCullough

The Charley Project is designed for missing people and is not an appropriate place to put up fugitives, so I really wasn’t sure about whether I should add Shannon Dion McCullough to my site or not. In the end I made a judgement call and decided to do so. I wanted to explain my reasoning.

I’ve got plenty of people listed on my site who had charges pending against them when they went missing. Usually it’s minor charges. McCullough’s charge was pretty major, as you can see in his casefile, and he was facing 15 years or possibly even more if convicted. That made me hesitate about posting him, because I wondered if he was running from the law. If I was facing 15+ years I might be tempted to run.

(For what it’s worth, I saw a post on a web board from one of McCullough’s family members saying he’s really not a bad guy or a violent one and the man he beat half to death was a big bad dude who was in a biker gang and had threatened McCullough with a knife. But moving on…)

However, I ultimately decided to post him for the following reasons:

  1. He’s already listed as a missing person on multiple perfectly reputable databases.
  2. His vehicle was found abandoned — wouldn’t he have taken it with him if was trying to get away?
  3. I couldn’t find any evidence that he had a habit of running, and he’d been in court for a lot of things, including at least one prior felony.

So Shannon McCullough was obviously not a model citizen but he does seem to be genuinely missing.

MP of the week: Larissa Sam

This week’s featured missing person is Larissa Marie Sam, a 22-year-old woman who disappeared from Indianapolis on June 21, 2015. After work she went to her uncle’s house and had a few drinks, leaving at 4:30 a.m. She never arrived home and her car was found abandoned, with a flat tire.

Larissa’s family thinks she might have been a human trafficking victim. She was certainly an attractive woman, and within the age range for sex trafficking. If that is true, then the best bet for finding her may lie with some of her customers, who must surely have noticed those tattoos. The one on her chest is very large and unique.

If she’s not being held captive, though, I think it’s pretty unlikely she’s still alive.

Sigh… my old friend Contradictory Sources reappears

Tonight in my updates, for Emmanuel Cornelius Quarles, the various sources I found were giving his age as anywhere from 24 to 28 and claiming he was last seen in either a red car or a white truck. I think the vehicle discrepancy may be related to the unconfirmed sighting after he left Pendleton but I’m not sure. I’d love to get his actual date of birth from somewhere. NamUs said he was 26 to 27 years old, and I picked 27, because of the age of his older son, who was eight years old when he disappeared. Though it is by no means unheard of or even terribly uncommon for 24-year-old to have an eight-year-old child. Who knows? Not me.

Meanwhile, for Cynthia Ramirez Rico, her NamUs page says she disappeared on June 30, 1987, but the Abilene Crime Stoppers page listed the year as 1983. That issue was settled when I looked at the “investigating agency” section on NamUs and it said her case got entered into the computer on February 23, 1987 — that is, before her alleged date of disappearance. 1983 it was, then. But her age was a bigger mystery, because Crime Stoppers said she was 20 but NamUs said she was 25 to 26. Even given the date discrepancy that didn’t make sense. However, both NamUs and Crime Stoppers give her current age as 53, which would make her year of birth 1963 or 1964. To this end I decided to list her age as 20, because that would make sense with the 1983 year of disappearance.

Cynthia Rico disappeared from a group home for mentally disabled adults. It’s likely that she lived there, meaning it’s likely she was mentally disabled, but because I don’t know that for sure, I didn’t say she was. I just explained about the group home and left readers to draw their own conclusions.