Sigh… my old friend Contradictory Sources reappears

Tonight in my updates, for Emmanuel Cornelius Quarles, the various sources I found were giving his age as anywhere from 24 to 28 and claiming he was last seen in either a red car or a white truck. I think the vehicle discrepancy may be related to the unconfirmed sighting after he left Pendleton but I’m not sure. I’d love to get his actual date of birth from somewhere. NamUs said he was 26 to 27 years old, and I picked 27, because of the age of his older son, who was eight years old when he disappeared. Though it is by no means unheard of or even terribly uncommon for 24-year-old to have an eight-year-old child. Who knows? Not me.

Meanwhile, for Cynthia Ramirez Rico, her NamUs page says she disappeared on June 30, 1987, but the Abilene Crime Stoppers page listed the year as 1983. That issue was settled when I looked at the “investigating agency” section on NamUs and it said her case got entered into the computer on February 23, 1987 — that is, before her alleged date of disappearance. 1983 it was, then. But her age was a bigger mystery, because Crime Stoppers said she was 20 but NamUs said she was 25 to 26. Even given the date discrepancy that didn’t make sense. However, both NamUs and Crime Stoppers give her current age as 53, which would make her year of birth 1963 or 1964. To this end I decided to list her age as 20, because that would make sense with the 1983 year of disappearance.

Cynthia Rico disappeared from a group home for mentally disabled adults. It’s likely that she lived there, meaning it’s likely she was mentally disabled, but because I don’t know that for sure, I didn’t say she was. I just explained about the group home and left readers to draw their own conclusions.

Flashback Friday: Frank Fox

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Frank Lamont Fox, who disappeared after a New Year’s party in Manchester, New York in 1983. He was walking home and never made it. It’s a “few details are available” case, but “drunk guy walking home late at night in the middle of winter” makes me wonder if he wandered off into the woods or fell into a river or something and froze to death or drowned.

(Okay, I don’t know 100% that he was drunk, but it seems likely.)

A stray thought

I was going over some old cases and NCMEC cases and stuff (and phoned in a tip to their hotline; I found a missing kid’s equally missing mother on Facebook) and noticed that on Amber Crum‘s casefile I’d written,

In 1986, investigators checked the fingerprints of a girl who was abandoned in California that same year. The girl matched Amber’s general physical description and was about the right age. Their fingerprints did not match, however.

I wonder, now, if that abandoned little girl was Denise Beaudin‘s child, Dawn/Lisa? Dawn was about the same age as Amber would have been, and she was abandoned in California in 1986.

I suppose I’ll probably never know. But it seems moderately likely.

Select It Sunday: David Gionet

David Robert Gionet‘s brother’s fiancee asked me to profile him for Select It Sunday. David was 18 when he disappeared on March 9, 1983, near the campus of the Interlochen Center for the Arts. His family has since found out that, contrary to popular belief (and contrary to what his Charley Project page says as of this writing), he wasn’t actually ON the campus. Here’s a flier I was given with the most updated information and a much better version of David’s photo.

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Needless to say, I’m going to update his case. But while we’re on the subject, can I have some more Sunday suggestions?

Flashback Friday: Kirk Quintons

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Kirk Quintons, an eleven-year-old boy who disappeared from the Bronx on September 18, 1983. I’ve got three pictures of him plus an age-progression, but the pics aren’t of the greatest quality.

Kirk made pocket money for himself by performing small jobs in his neighborhood. His mom sent him to the store to get her some pop, and he was last seen collecting bottles near the store, probably to turn in for money. He was only two blocks from home, but he never made it back.

He has several strikes against him when it comes to get media attention: black, male, just barely old enough for people to think he might have run away, and probably poor. I can’t find any contemporary articles about Kirk in the newspaper archives.

There was, however, an article about the case published in 2013, and Kirk’s mother, Lila Quintons, was interviewed for it. Google says she still lives in the Bronx. Still waiting for her little boy to come home.

Select It Sunday: Miriam Cavallo

Chosen by Jaclyn: Miriam A. Cavallo, who disappeared from Los Angeles, California on November 23, 1983. She was 19 at the time and was a high school classmate of a friend of Jaclyn’s, apparently.

Other than the area she disappeared from — Victory Boulevard and Topanga Avenue — and the time — 11:30 p.m. — I’ve got exactly zilch on Miriam’s disappearance. Nothing. Nada.

I would love it if a family member or someone else who knew her would reach out to me, either by email at administrator@charleyproject.org or in the comments on this blog.

If she is alive, Miriam Cavallo would be 51 today.

Holy wow, what happened here?

I was looking at Charley’s visitor stats and noticed that last month my average was nearly 19,000 independent visits a day. My usual average is 9-10,000 visits a day. When I looked at the page for April at first I thought there was a mistake, because most of the days seemed to hover around 10,000, sometimes more, sometimes less.

Then I saw April 21 and 22. 30,509 visits for April 21. And a whopping 198,839 visits for April 22.

Whaaaat?

The number of visits for the days after that are elevated, but not hugely so — around 15,000. And surprisingly, the most-visited casefile is not Peter Kema‘s, but Tammy Leppert‘s.

Did something big happen in Tammy’s case that I’m missing? The only thing I can find is that Tammy was the subject of this Reddit thread.