Native American Heritage Month: N’Cita Blue Thunder

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is N’Cita Blue Thunder, a 17-year-old girl who disappeared from Beach, North Dakota, a small town on the Montana border, on July 9, 2014. I do not know N’Cita’s tribal info, but it’s noted that her Native name is Black Lance.

Curiously, I can’t find any other trace of N’Cita other than what’s on NamUs. You’d think she’d have had a social media account, but if she did, I can’t find it. Though she was under eighteen when she disappeared, she isn’t listed on the NCMEC.

And I can find out precisely zilch about the circumstances of her disappearance. Few details are available.

Ooh, this is a problem

So I just added the case of Charles Edward Tear, missing from Fargo, North Dakota, to Charley. And there’s an issue. Namely this:

Tear’s NamUs profile gives the date of disappearance as June 29, 2011. But this article has it as June 29, 2001.

One or the other of them is clearly wrong, but I’m damned if I know which. The difference is simply the slip of a finger, a typo. Oh, and ten full years.

I’m going with what NamUs says for now, but I wish I was more certain that was accurate. NamUs isn’t always correct. (Case in point: Tejin Thomas is still listed as a girl on there.)

MP of the week: Bruce Falconer

This week’s featured missing person is Bruce Falconer, a 21-year-old Marine who disappeared from Bismarck, North Dakota on February 20, 1981, after a night out with his friend Tim Jewell. Jewell disappeared also, but his body was found in 1992. I suppose by then there probably wasn’t much left, but the authorities ruled the cause of death as exposure and they think Bruce probably died of exposure too.

Their car got stuck in the mud along the Missouri River and I guess the two men left to get help, but got lost. Winter weather in North Dakota is no joke, and probably both of them had been drinking.

I do think it’s slightly odd that Jewell’s body was recovered and Falconer’s wasn’t. You’d think they’d be close together.

Yeah, so this is the first time I’ve been to my computer in a few days. I’ve got a horrible cold and have mostly been lying in bed and reading a bit and sleeping a lot.

MP of the week: Edward “Ashton” Stubbs

This week’s featured missing person is Edward Ashton Stubbs, who goes by his middle name. He was less than a week shy of his 16th birthday when he walked away from his summer job in Dickinson, North Dakota and vanished on June 17, 2013.

Most agencies classify Ashton as a runaway. His family was quoted as saying he had health issues. I can’t figure out what those issues were, but I’m wondering if they were mental health issues rather than physical, since he was working a construction job and laying drywall. But I don’t know.

If Ashton is still alive, and I hope he is, he’d be 20 years old by now.

Select It Sunday: Kevin Mahoney

Sorry about missing Flashback Friday; I was visiting my dad and didn’t get back till relatively late yesterday. Anyway, this week’s Select It Sunday case was chosen by Angie: Kevin Gerald Mahoney, missing from Fargo, North Dakota since October 2, 1993. He was 25. He left home to walk to his brother’s apartment south of Moorhead, Minnesota, but never arrived. Google Maps says Fargo and Moorhead are only 1.5 miles apart.

I don’t have much on Mr. Mahoney, other than that foul play is suspected in his disappearance. A search for recent news on his case (I haven’t updated his casefile since 2010) turned up nothing.

Sean Munger profiles Donna Michalenko

Sean Munger has written about Donna Michalenko on his blog. The case is 45 years old and Donna would be an old woman if she is still alive. Which she could be, I suppose. Although “foul play is suspected in her case” I don’t know why that is, whether there’s concrete evidence like blood or something, or just four and a half decades of silence.

Donna disappeared from Kief, ND, which might well be the smallest town listed on the Charley Project. The population was 97 the year she disappeared, which seems like New York friggin’ City to what it is now: 13. THIRTEEN.