Thinking aloud about some of yesterday’s cases

I will add cases of MPs who are also wanted for some crime or other on a case-by-case basis. Loutonia Alexander has a warrant for his arrest for failure to appear in court on a minor weed charge, and it seems unlikely he’s been hiding since 2006 just because of that.

Sometimes I am a bit leery. Pricella Williams is, for example, listed on the FDLE database as a missing person, so I added her. But I’m pretty sure she’s not so much “missing” as “on the run.” If you Google her name — and make sure to search for Pricella, not Priscilla — the results are, shall we say, interesting. And the cops were seeking to have her designated a habitual offender, meaning she was facing some serious prison time.

Nevertheless, she is listed as a missing person with FDLE, and so I put her up on Charley. It’s entirely on the cards that she hung out with some bad people and something bad happened to her.

I found this PDF of Indiana missing persons and wound up adding dates of birth to loads of cases yesterday. I didn’t note this on the updates page cause that was too insignificant an update in my opinion. I did discover, based off those DOBs, that several of the listed ages on these people’s NamUs page are wrong.

I Googled names from the PDF, trying to get photos of these people so I could add them to Charley. I added several from Fort Wayne, where I live. Ryan Baughman‘s case struck me as pretty sad. On his Facebook page you can see he has two young kids. In his final post, six weeks before his disappearance, he wrote:

baughman

I can certainly understand why Ryan’s family believes he may have ODed or may have met with foul play. The reference to Hells Angels is worrying, though I’m not sure if he literally meant he was involved with them.

I wish I could find a Facebook page for Derrell Sims. I looked but didn’t see one. I really would like some more photos of them because they were apparently taken before he got the face tattoo. Personal Facebook pages of people are great sources of photos, and also tattoos — they often post photos of them, like “Hey, new ink, check it out.”

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I have this to say

You know, I rarely openly criticize the police, because I am not a police officer and I do not know what they know, but I have to say the cops in David Morrison‘s case were a bunch of idiots.

I mean, you see a body floating in water just a few feet deep, practically within arm’s length of shore, and it’s windy and the lake is choppy and it’s LAKE MICHIGAN, it’s not a little pond or anything, and you don’t bother to fetch it? Just chill out on the shoreline and watch the lake take the body away?

Genius. And someone probably got away with murder because of it. Hard to prosecute without a body, particularly in 1979.

That is all.

MP of the week: Larissa Sam

This week’s featured missing person is Larissa Marie Sam, a 22-year-old woman who disappeared from Indianapolis on June 21, 2015. After work she went to her uncle’s house and had a few drinks, leaving at 4:30 a.m. She never arrived home and her car was found abandoned, with a flat tire.

Larissa’s family thinks she might have been a human trafficking victim. She was certainly an attractive woman, and within the age range for sex trafficking. If that is true, then the best bet for finding her may lie with some of her customers, who must surely have noticed those tattoos. The one on her chest is very large and unique.

If she’s not being held captive, though, I think it’s pretty unlikely she’s still alive.

FINALLY another “Let’s Talk About It”

It’s been awhile since I did my last “Let’s Talk About It” case, but I haven’t given up on them. This week is a double disappearance: Diamond Bynum and her her two-year-old nephew, King Rajan Walker, who disappeared on July 25, 2015.

Diamond was 21 and suffered from Prader-Willi Syndrome, a genetic condition characterized mainly by mental disability and a constant feeling of hunger. If not kept supervised, people with this condition will just eat and eat and eat until they get sick. At 4’10, Diamond weighed well over 200 pounds, and she had the mental capacity of a five- to seven-year-old.

She had recently moved with her parents to Gary, Indiana, and her nephew, King Walker, was visiting. Apparently the two of them slipped out while Grandma was taking a nap. Diamond regularly walked in the neighborhood in the town where she used to live, but that was safer because she’d lived there all her life and the locals knew her and knew she was disabled and looked out for her.

But she wasn’t familiar with Gary, and, well, Gary is an awful place. It’s regularly ranked as one of the ten most dangerous cities in the country and something like one-fifth of the population lives under the poverty line. The city is a swath of urban decay, with all sorts of ramshackle abandoned buildings — it’s really sad.

I think this case would have gotten more media attention if Diamond and King had been white, or more affluent, or at least disappeared from a more affluent area. But I do have to wonder what happened to them.

Foul play seems like an obvious answer…but why? The family seems to be in the clear. An extensive search of the neighborhood, all those abandoned buildings, turned up doodly squat. No one seems to know anything. I can’t think of a kidnapper or a serial killer or a human trafficker who would want BOTH a very overweight, mentally disabled young woman AND a two-year-old boy. It seems like one or the other should have turned up.

So what caused these two to disappear? Let’s talk about it.

Flashback Friday: Timothy Willoughby

This week’s FF case is Timothy Lee Willoughby, a 24-year-old who disappeared with his girlfriend, Mary Ann Higginbotham, from the tiny town of Clayton in central Indiana on June 6, 1978. A year later, Mary Ann’s body was found stuffed inside a drum in Mooresville, Indiana, twelve miles from Clayton. She’d been shot in the head. She was 22 years old.

At first the police thought Timothy had killed her, but now they think both of them met with foul play. Two men were arrested for the murders but were later released.

Delano Wilson’s father found not guilty of murder

I found out from the “No Body” Twitter feed that Delano Wilson‘s father, Willie Wilson who’d been charged with killing him, has been found not guilty. That’s quite unusual; even in MWAB cases, most people in this country that face criminal charges either plead out, or get convicted at trial. If you look at my list of convictions in MWAB cases, it’s more than three times longer than my list of acquittals. I think the rate of MWAB convictions is so high because, without a body, all other aspects of the case must be very strong, airtight as it were.

And apparently the case wasn’t airtight here. This article says the prosecution pointed out that Willie Wilson invented a story about his son being kidnapped, a story that was easily disproved, and said the only reasonable explanation why Willie dreamed up the abduction story is because he killed Delano. But there was almost no physical evidence to speak of,  or witnesses, and I’m thinking perhaps at least some of the jury members were like “I know he’s guilty, but…” The law says if there is reasonable doubt, the jury must acquit the defendant.

That poor baby was only six weeks old.

MP of the week: Monterrio Holder

This week’s featured missing persons is Monterrio L. Holder. He disappeared from Indianapolis on October 25, 1994. His car wasn’t found till sometime the following year. There’s a mention of him in the Indianapolis Recorder (read the very last sentence at the very bottom), but I can’t find that article anywhere. Alas, I’ve got nothing on him.