MP of the week: Shy’Kemmia Pate

This week’s featured missing person is Shy’Kemmia Shy’Rezz Pate, a beautiful eight-year-old girl who’s been missing from Unadilla, Georgia for nearly twenty years now: September 4, 1998. There hasn’t been a lot of news about this disappearance, but on the face of it it’s a non-family abduction — by who, they don’t seem to know.

The family has a Facebook page set up for the little girl, nicknamed ShyShy.

MP of the week: Andrew Brown

This week’s featured missing person is Andrew Lee Brown. I have almost zilch on his case, which is really sad when you consider that he was only 18 months old when he disappeared. It was on July 24, 1987 in Colquitt, Georgia, a small town and county seat of Miller County, in the southwestern part of the state.

I have never been able to find anything about Andrew in news archives. Of course a name like “Andrew Brown” doesn’t exactly help matters. For what it’s worth, the NCMEC classifies his case as a non-family abduction.

If Andrew is still alive, he would be 31 today.

Arrest in Tara Grinstead case

In a major breakthrough, a suspect has been charged with murder in the 2005 disappearance of Tara Faye Grinstead, who vanished from Ocilla, Georgia. Her case has been very high profile over the years. The alleged killer, Ryan Alexander Duke, had been a student at the school where Tara taught, but graduated three years before she vanished. And he wasn’t a suspect, wasn’t even “on the radar” as far as the investigation was concerned, until quite recently.

Until I update her case (probably later today), content yourself with the following articles:

Flashback Friday: Darron Glass

For Flashback Friday I’ve got Darron Glass, a ten-year-old who disappeared from his Atlanta foster home on September 14, 1980. He’s presumed to be a victim of the Atlanta Child Killer, the only one whose body was never found.

I don’t know much about the Atlanta Child Murders, but I do know that some people don’t believe Wayne Williams, the prime suspect who’s in prison for two of the killings, is guilty. According to this commenter on my blog, it’s possible Darron Glass was found deceased long ago and his body was misidentified as one of the other victims.

Carlene Tengelsen’s mom dies

I’ve been informed of this article that went out yesterday: Carlene Sessions Tengelsen‘s mother died on December 21, at the age of 83. This is her obituary, which says Carlene preceded her in death, along with another daughter. Carlene still has two living siblings though.

I wish the NCMEC would make a poster for her. I wish we could find out what happened. It’s been almost 45 years, and Carlene would be sixty years old in the unlikely event that she’s still alive.

Make-a-List Monday: Lost files

Missing persons cases, particularly adult MPs, are not often treated all that seriously by the police. It used to be a lot worse, though. For example, it used to be that teens were automatically classified as runaways and the cops didn’t even bother to search for them. See this example (courtesy of Peter Henderson) regarding the 1972 disappearance of Carlene Sessions Tengelsen from Macon, Georgia:

The Macon Police would not take a formal missing person’s report for 24 hours and when they did they said Carlene was not missing, she was just a teen runaway who would be home soon. But Carlene never came home.

Finally at the Tengelsens’ request the car was dusted for fingerprints but none were found.

The family quickly realized they would have to head up the search for their daughter themselves. For weeks teens from Carlene’s high school would fan out looking for her, at the end of the day they would come home in tears.

Carlene’s case was treated like most missing teen’s in the seventies, “toe-tag-cold from the get-go,” her sister Joanette said.

Two years later the Macon police wrote her mother a note asking if she had come home yet, they wanted to close her file. They said it was sill an “active investigation.” Her family laughed. If that was the case why did they not know she was still missing, they wondered.

[The above quote in italics is courtesy of Peter Henderson and used with permission.]

I’ve got several cases on the Charley Project where the MP’s investigation file just up and disappeared — thrown away, “borrowed” and never returned, accidentally or intentionally destroyed, or simply misplaced. And as the years pass and the original police officers move on or retire, the police department just might forget about the MP entirely. Somebody, usually a concerned relative, has to file a second report, and then the investigation has to start all over again and this time perhaps it’s been decades.

This doesn’t happen as often as it used to, because of computers and the internet and digitizing everything, but I’m sure it still happens on rare occasions.

Anyway, this list is of cases where all the records, or a significant part of the records, got lost.

  1. Teresa Armanda Alfonso
  2. Susan Diane Wolf Cappel
  3. Judith Ann Elwell
  4. Lian Fang Feng
  5. Cynthia Robin Gooding
  6. Karen Beth Kamsch
  7. Delvacchio Lanier
  8. Lorraine Migl Light
  9. Isley McCullough
  10. Juanita Ritchie
  11. Leigh Frances Savoie
  12. Sallie Belle Maxi Signani
  13. Alice Mae Van Alstine

Flashback Friday: Carlene Tengelsen

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Carlene Sessions Tengelsen, a 16-year-old (who for some reason has never been on the NCMEC that I know of) who disappeared from Macon, Georgia on June 21, 1972. That day Carlene took the family car to a shopping center, and left a note at her boyfriend’s workplace there. She had only just gotten her driver’s license and this was the very first time she’d driven anywhere alone. She was supposed to pick up her sister from summer camp, but never did. She never returned home. The car turned up abandoned in a donut shop parking lot, unlocked, with the windows rolled down.

In a heart-wrenching detail, when Carlene’s family moved out of town a year later, they left a note behind for her and a special telephone hooked up to a missing person’s hotline. The new owners of the house kept the phone in service for two years but Carlene never did show up. Her family later returned to Macon. Last I knew, Carlene’s mother and sister were still alive, still waiting for answers.