Article about David Miera…and my own public record digging

The Albuquerque Journal has profiled David Miera in this article. Until now I hadn’t known whether “Zerfas” was the mom’s boyfriend’s first name or his last name. Turns out the man’s full name was Leon Zerfas but he went by his initials, LG. The article includes a great deal of information, including pictures of both Zerfas and David’s mother Genevieve.

The article says Leon was “the estranged son of an Indiana physician who apparently chose a darker, wilder course.” I found this obituary on Find a Grave for a Dr. Leon G. Zerfas from Indiana, who died in 1978. He had a PhD as well as an MD, AND he studied law, AND he donated a million bucks to Indiana University, his alma mater. (That was in 1972. The modern equivalent would be something on the order of $3.4 million. Way to go, Dr. Z.) Dr. Zerfas, in addition to being an Indiana physician like the article said, would be the right age to be LG Zerfas’s father, and if they had the same name that would explain why LG went by his initials…but the obituary lists only one child, a Dr. Charles Zerfas, who it says also lived in Indiana.

Looking further, I found a picture of Dr. Leon Zerfas and he resembles the photo of LG Zerfas from the Albuquerque Journal article. I’m almost certain that’s his father, in spite of what the obituary said. Maybe the obit doesn’t list Dr. Zerfas’s other son because of the estrangement?

(UPDATE 8/10/2013: A person who wishes to remain anonymous has informed me that LG Zerfas was NOT Dr. Leon Zerfas’s son or even a close relative, and all those things I mentioned that match are merely coincidental. I’ll be darned.)

In any case, the Leon Zerfas that was Genevieve’s mother’s boyfriend died in 2005, taking whatever he knew to the grave. I can’t find anything about the circumstances of his death. All the articles I can find when I search for that name are about a Utah teen who was murdered twenty years earlier.

I also looked up “Zerfas” the surname because I’d never heard it before. Turns out it’s German, a respelling of “Serfass.” Yes, ladies and gentlemen, Serf Ass. And on that note, I’m sorry, I can’t resist: