I got quoted in a Torrington Register Citizen article

Like a month ago I was interviewed about the Connie Smith case, and the articles about it are finally coming out. This one came out on August 13; now the second one has been released, and it contains a quote from me:

Meaghan Good, 32, of Ohio, has been administrator for The Charley Project website since 2004. The site profiles approximately 10,000 “cold case” missing people, mainly from the U.S., from the 1800s up until now, with 10, 671 cases currently open.

Good posits that Connie likely met with foul play: “You see this a lot, especially in the 10-to-13 age group,” she said. “They start becoming more independent but they are still pretty naïve.”

“It is very, very sad,” she said. “The father lived to be a Biblical age and never found out about her. The suspect would likely be dead now. But it is possible for the case to be solved. Technology makes it resolvable.”

 

Sean blogs about Connie Smith

Sean Munger has blogged about Constance “Connie” Smith, whose disappearance over sixty years ago is still notorious. What happened to her is anyone’s guess, though it probably wasn’t anything good. Connie’s disappearance was one of three featured in Michael Dooling’s book Clueless in New England.

Finished Clueless in New England

The author of Clueless in New England attempts to tie the 1946 disappearance of Paula Welden and the 1952 disappearance of Connie Smith with an earlier case, that of Katherine Hull in 1936. Katherine was 22 when she disappeared from Lebanon Springs, New York. Her skeletal remains were found in a nearby wooded area seven years later. There wasn’t much left of her and the police had almost zero evidence to go on, so they closed her case as an accidental death and threw out all her investigation files. But as Dooling points out, it could well have been murder. We’ll never know now.

I’m not at all convinced by his serial killer theory — the many years between the disappearances, and the fact that they occurred hundreds of many miles apart, are hard to get over — but I do think this was an excellent book. It provides a wealth of detail on all three women’s cases, as much detail as you’re going to get at this late date, not only about the disappearances themselves but about the investigations and the way police did things back in the day. I will be updating Paula and Connie’s casefiles with additional information from the book.

Well done, Mr. Dooling.

Now reading Clueless In New England

I am on page 106 of Clueless in New England, a book I mentioned before which covers the disappearances of Paula Welden from Vermont in 1946 and Connie Smith from Connecticut in 1952, as well as other cases. It’s very good so far, and has a new picture of Connie and better quality photos of Paula, all of which I plan to scan and post on Charley.

The book mentions the disappearance of eight-year-old Paul Jepson from Vermont in 1950. I found several articles about it on NewspaperArchive, but unfortunately no pictures. If anyone knows where I can find a picture of the little boy, tell me so I can add him to Charley too.

Another new MP book

I just found out about another book on missing people that was published last year: Clueless in New England: The Unsolved Disappearances of Paula Welden, Connie Smith and Katherine Hull, by Michael C. Dooling. I put in a library request for it, since its publisher did not see fit to send me a surprise free copy.

Katherine Hull is no longer missing; she was found dead seven years after she vanished. The whereabouts of Paula Welden and Connie Smith are still unsolved mysteries, however.