Some news in Chance Wackerhagen’s disappearance

Per this article, the police no longer believe Chance Wackerhagen‘s father, Lee “Dub” Wackerhagen Jr., murdered his live-in girlfriend and then abducted Chance. The two have been missing since Christmas 1993, after Lee’s girlfriend, Latricia White, was found shot to death in her home. At present, Lee is listed as Chance’s abductor in his casefile. But the cops have a new theory, that someone else killed Latricia and that Lee and Chance also met with foul play.

That’s something I had considered myself, because it seems like those two dropped off the face of the earth. I didn’t think Lee had the kind of skills and resources necessary to keep himself and his son off the radar for so long when he was wanted for murder, and it seems like Chance would have found some way to call home if he could have. (And perhaps he did. See casefile.) I thought both of them had probably died a very short time after Latricia did, but I didn’t know if it was a murder-suicide situation or if another person altogether had been involved.

Now that I have the police endorsing this new theory, I’m not really sure how best to update Chance’s casefile. Should I make a whole new casefile for Lee as a missing person in his own right, do you think?

The article also has a color version of my previous black-and-white photo of Chance. I have replaced the photo accordingly.

MP of the week: Norman Pappas

This week’s featured missing person is Norman Basil Pappas. This slender, fresh-faced 19-year-old disappeared from the small town of Carmel, California on July 26, 1993, a month shy of his twentieth birthday.

And that’s all. This case is pretty slim pickings: “Few details are available.” I can’t find anything else about Norman or his disappearance from any of my usual sources.

If Norman Pappas is still alive, he would be 43 years old this coming summer. I’d love it if anyone who knew him or his family or anything about this case could comment or at least shoot me an email.

YouTube Saturday: Five vids, one taken down

[Argh, I meant this to run a day later. Oh well, you get it early this time.]

This week it’s three females, one male. I had Florence Dumontet’s video taken down on account of her being found, and that’s why I posted one more female case than male, to maintain the sex balance. In chronological order:

Brian Joseph Page, 1975

Anthony Tyrone Woodson, 1981

Megan Elizabeth Garner, 1991

Shakeima Ann Cabbagestalk, 1993

Kelsey Emily Collins, 2009

(Out of curiosity, I looked up the surname “Cabbagestalk” on Ancestry.com and discovered it’s very rare. Only a few families in South Carolina and Florida have that name. If you meet one, chances are the person is related in some way to Shakeima. It’s one of those cases where I know just enough details to drive me crazy.)

MP news lately

I’ve been out of the loop the last ten days, but here’s a couple of things that have happened in the meantime in the missing persons world.

Jenika Feuerstein has been located deceased. The twenty-year-old disappeared from Mesa, Arizona five years ago, on January 3, 2009. Target shooters found her skeletal remains taped inside a container in the desert. Obviously a homicide.

Tommy Lynn Sells, a serial killer, was executed last Thursday. He’s listed as a suspect or person of interest in several Charley Project cases: Lauria Bible/Ashley Freeman, Juanita Bardin and Stefanie Stroh. Yay, more cases for me to update! I might not put up a notice for these ones though.

They’ve started a search for the body of Ladana Wiley, who disappeared from Texas on New Years’ Day, 2000. Ladana’s case has never once been updated in the whole history of the Charley Project. I don’t have much on her.

Thomas Funk‘s family has doubled the reward for information leading to his location. He went missing from Florida in 2011 — another case about which I know little. I’ve got pics of his tattoos though.

Plea deal in Andrea Parsons disappearance

Chester Price, one of two suspects in the presumed murder of Andrea Parsons, has dropped his plea of not guilty of murder and changed it to no contest of reduced charges of kidnapping and manslaughter. (Always a chicken-guano plea in my opinion, “no contest” means the person doesn’t admit guilt but acknowledges there’s enough evidence to convict him of the crime.) In exchange, Price gets…ten years in prison. For the death of a little girl.

From this article, the prosecutor explains why: “If we went to trial on a case that has issues because of age, lost witnesses, death of witnesses, you could look at the possibility of a not guilty verdict which would mean there’d be no justice, not even a drop of justice for Andrea.”

This article provides further information on why the state’s case was so weak: It’s twenty years old, there’s no body, the star witness is not credible and he also happens to be dead.

The star witness is Claude Davis, the other suspect in Andrea’s disappearance. He was actually charged in her case, but they screwed that up and had to let him go and because of double jeopardy they couldn’t charge him again. Check out Andrea’s Charley Project casefile for details. I was unaware until now that Davis had died.

All of Andrea’s family has left the area and none of them were in court for the sentencing, but her mother submitted this letter.

Very sad.

I got to pick my own this time

For the first time in over a month, maybe two months, I got to choose my own missing person of the week. I’ve had a lot of people requesting different cases lately, and I could hardly refuse them. But there are no requests at present.

This week’s featured MP is Dorothy Smith Kelley, a lady in her sixties who disappeared from her house in Texas twenty years ago this month. I don’t have much on her.

For the first time in a long time…

…there’s something in the news about the unsolved disappearance of four-year-old Rosa Marie “Rosita” Camacho and the murder of her mother, Rosa Delgado, who was found dismembered in a lake and not identified for two years. The prime suspect in the case is Julio Camacho, who is Rosa’s ex-boyfriend and Rosita’s father. And, disgustingly, he was a cop, one who abused his position to sexually exploit women.

Julio was convicted of two counts of rape and imprisoned, but he’s never been charged in Rosa’s death or Rosita’s disappearance. He’s gotten out of prison now, lives in Virginia and is registered as a sex offender. The article I linked to (which provides a great deal more info about the case than I’d previously known) notes that he had to pay $188 a week for Rosita’s support. And he was already paying support for two children from a previous marriage, and in 1993 he was determined to be the father of still another woman’s child and ordered to pay an additional $600 a month.

I realize that there’s inflation and $188 or whatever was worth more in 1993 than it is now, but it’s such a piddling amount of money to (probably) commit two murders over.

Reminds me of Jay-Quan Mosley, whose so-called father killed him and his mom over a good deal less: $40 a week. $2,000 a year. A month’s rent for a substantial percentage of the population. A semester’s tuition at community college. Not the price of a decent used car. What the heck is wrong with some people?

Rosita Camacho would be 20 years old this June…if she’s alive.

Canadian MWAB case

A suspect has been arrested in the 1993 disappearance of Christine Harron from Hanover, Ontario. She was 15 at the time. Anthony Edward Ringel had actually been arrested for Christine’s murder back in 2004 and confessed, but he was released on a technicality in 2006. Now they’re giving it a second go.

I hope it sticks this time.

Recent MP news

I’ve been idling these last few days, offline almost entirely. I’m back now but not sure if I’ll update today or not; I’m not feeling very well and have some distractions.

Recent news in the MP world:

Bill Crider, the husband of Joyce Crider, was killed in a car wreck a week ago. He was never ruled out as a suspect in her case and in the article I just linked to, Joyce’s mom openly accuses him of murder. In the comments section several people who knew Bill are quite indignant about her remarks.

A suspect, John Alan Mellquist, has been charged in the murder of Annelise Schweikardt, who disappeared from Sarasota, Florida in 2003. She had rented a room to him and was attempting to evict him at the time of her disappearance, and he tried to explain her absence by saying she had left the country. A lot of blood was found in her home, enough so that the police were pretty sure a homicide had taken place. But Annelise was a German citizen who had no immediate family in the United States, and it took a long time to create a DNA profile for her to test against the blood.

There’s an article about Herlinda Ann Soto, who vanished in 1993 and left behind an ex-husband, two kids and the bloodiest crime scene the police had seen in years. The article has a little more information than I had before. Herlinda’s ex-husband would be the obvious suspect, but he had an alibi. The police believe someone murdered her inside her home, transported her body in the trunk of her own car and then disposed of it — the body, not the car, which was abandoned — somewhere. They think more than one person was involved.

There’s been a spate of news about Kevin Collins, a ten-year-old who vanished from San Francisco in 1984. It was a very famous case at the time. The police have searched the former residence of a suspect, Wayne Jackson Dan Leonard Therrien, who died in 2008. (He apparently used several alias names.) He lived across the street from Kevin’s school, had a history of sex crimes against children, looked like the man with the dog whom witnesses saw talking to Kevin before his disappearance, and owned a similar dog. Alas, the search turned up zip, zilch, nada, except a few bones that are in all probability animal bones, though they got sent to a lab for analysis just in case.

And I don’t usually talk about unidentifieds, but this article touched me: three little girls and a young woman, murdered sometime in the late seventies or early eighties, stripped naked, stuffed into two metal barrels and dumped in the woods in Allenstown, New Hampshire. The barrels were found fifteen years apart. Two of the children were toddlers, but the other child was old enough to be in school. The woman and two of the children are related, but not the third child. The police don’t have the foggiest idea who any of them are. (Their NCMEC poster is here.) To me it looks like some man, probably husband and father of the victims, decided he didn’t want to have a family any more and killed them all. But who knows. It was a lot easier to hide that kind of thing back then.