Even more Facebook

Although this isn’t Monday (and I’ve kind of discontinued my Make-a-List Mondays cause I just don’t want to do them anymore) I thought you guys would appreciate another list of Facebook pages out there created for specific missing persons cases.

These are the ones I know about which weren’t on my previous two lists of this. The first two lists are here and here. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list; it’s just cases on the Charley Project where they have currently existing Facebook pages that I know about. Some people have more than one page for them.

I would also like to state that social media’s a great resource to publicize missing persons cases, and you don’t need to be a relative or anything to make a Facebook page or group for a missing person; you can just be an interested party.

  1. Joseph Mario Abrams (Charley/Facebook)
  2. Brent Marshall Acomb (Charley/Facebook)
  3. Joshua Scott Adams (Charley/Facebook)
  4. Mark Daniel Aguilar (Charley/Facebook)
  5. Katelin Michelle Akens (Charley/Facebook)
  6. Raymond Paul Akins (Charley/Facebook)
  7. Mohammed Abdulmohsen Alghannam (Charley/Facebook)
  8. Bobby Dale Allen (Charley/Facebook)
  9. Debra Ann Allen (Charley/Facebook)
  10. Gabriel James Almiron and Emily Amada Quijano (Charley/Charley/Facebook)
  11. Rebecca Jane Alsup (Charley/Facebook)
  12. Dennis Lee Anderson (Charley/Facebook)
  13. Leo Anicua (Charley/Facebook)
  14. David Phillip Askew (Charley/Facebook)
  15. Lucely Aramburo (Charley/Facebook)
  16. Jonathan Arash Barmaki (Charley/Facebook)
  17. Christina Lynn Bastian (Charley/Facebook)
  18. DonaMae Bourgeois Bayerl (Charley/Facebook)
  19. Keely Christabel Beaudry-Culver (Charley/Facebook)
  20. Ralph Belvedere and William Dewey Bragg III (Charley/Charley/Facebook)
  21. Tarasha Benjamin (Charley/Facebook)
  22. Joshua Charles Berry (Charley/Facebook/Facebook)
  23. Dustin Lynn Bird (Charley/Facebook)
  24. Nancy Susan Bjork (Charley/Facebook)
  25. Marina Pearl Boelter (Charley/Facebook/Facebook)
  26. Christine Lee Boggio (Charley/Facebook)
  27. Shannah Marie Boiteau (Charley/Facebook)
  28. Darace Xavier Bolton (Charley/Facebook)
  29. Aliyah Boomer (Charley/Facebook)
  30. Karen Rae Bosta (Charley/Facebook)
  31. Jayme Malynn Bowen (Charley/Facebook)
  32. Krista Bowman (Charley/Facebook)
  33. Damon Lee Boyd (Charley/Facebook)
  34. David Allen Boyle (Charley/Facebook)
  35. Benjamin W. Brewer (Charley/Facebook)
  36. DeAnna Kay Brooks (Charley/Facebook)
  37. Edwin X. Brown (Charley/Facebook)
  38. Tamborah Brown (Charley/Facebook)
  39. George Stanley Burdynski Jr. (Charley/Facebook)
  40. Kristian Michael Burnstad (Charley/Facebook)
  41. Jacob Cabinaw (Charley/Facebook)
  42. Jennifer Cahill-Shadle (Charley/Facebook)
  43. Michael James Calvert (Charley/Facebook)
  44. Heather Leann Cameron (Charley/Facebook)
  45. Stacy Lynn Carson (Charley/Facebook)
  46. Natasha Alexandra Augusta Carter (Charley/Facebook)
  47. Amber Lynn Caton (Charley/Facebook)
  48. Autumn Starr Cerenil-Lee (Charley/Facebook)
  49. Alejandro Landa Cervantes (Charley/Facebook)
  50. Tyler Joel Christensen (Charley/Facebook)
  51. Cody Robert Christle (Charley/Facebook)
  52. Joanna Antoinette Clark and (Charley/Charley/Facebook)
  53. Chelsea Michelle Cobo (Charley/Facebook)
  54. Christopher George Cochron (Charley/Facebook)
  55. Lawrence Scott Colton (Charley/Facebook)
  56. Donald E. Cook (Charley/Facebook)
  57. David Allen Crabtree (Charley/Facebook)
  58. Michelle Deanne Crawford (Charley/Facebook)
  59. Holly Paige Crider (Charley/Facebook)
  60. Camille Dorothy Dardanes (Charley/Facebook)
  61. Theresa Ann Davidson-Murphy (Charley/Facebook)
  62. Julie Gwenn Davis (Charley/Facebook)
  63. Kyle Richard Dinneen (Charley/Facebook)
  64. Annette Campbell Dodd (Charley/Facebook)
  65. Jennifer Marie Donais (Charley/Facebook)
  66. Patricia Marie Dudek (Charley/Facebook)
  67. Brenda Louise Dunham (Charley/Facebook)
  68. Akia Shawnta Eggleston (Charley/Facebook)
  69. William James Elgen (Charley/Facebook)
  70. Leanne Cleo Eller (Charley/Facebook)
  71. Beatriz Noemi Espinoza (Charley/Facebook)
  72. Lelia Faulkner (Charley/Facebook)
  73. Keith Allan Fetter (Charley/Facebook)
  74. Sylviane Finck-Lozada (Charley/Facebook)
  75. Robin Kristine Ford (Charley/Facebook)
  76. Daniel Joseph Frank Foster (Charley/Facebook)
  77. Kristopher Michael Fowler (Charley/Facebook)
  78. Amanda Lee Fravel (Charley/Facebook)
  79. Natasha Louise Fugate Jones (Charley/Facebook)
  80. Sylvia June Galvan (Charley/Facebook)
  81. Kianna Galvin (Charley/Facebook)
  82. Angel Garcia (Charley/Facebook)
  83. Rebecca Pauline Gary (Charley/Facebook)
  84. Melvin P. George (Charley/Facebook)
  85. Ember Skye Graham (Charley/Facebook)
  86. Jacob Randall Gray (Charley/Facebook/Facebook)
  87. Lisa Marie Green (Charley/Facebook)
  88. Maxine Eve Green (Charley/Facebook)
  89. Janice Marie Hannigan (Charley/Facebook)
  90. La’Ron Harris (Charley/Facebook)
  91. Shaniece Rose Harris (Charley/Facebook)
  92. Robert Gene Harrison (Charley/Facebook)
  93. Stephanie Dianne Hartwell (Charley/Facebook)
  94. Amy Lyn Haueter (Charley/Facebook)
  95. Larry Brian Haynes (Charley/Facebook)
  96. Roger Her (Charley/Facebook)
  97. Emily Lynn Hieber (Charley/Facebook)
  98. Ashley Standish Higgins (Charley/Facebook)
  99. Angelia Spaulding Hilbert (Charley/Facebook)
  100. Darren Bruce Hillis (Charley/Facebook)
  101. Heather Dialian Hodges (Charley/Facebook)
  102. Courtney Esther Danielle Holt and Samantha Jean Hopper (Charley/Charley/Facebook)
  103. Angela Whalen Hudson (Charley/Facebook)
  104. William James Hummelsund (Charley/Facebook)
  105. Erica Nicole Hunt (Charley/Facebook)
  106. Charles Edward Jackson Jr. (Charley/Facebook)
  107. Keeshae Eunique Jacobs (Charley/Facebook)
  108. Julianne Cecilia Jaillet (Charley/Facebook)
  109. Brenda Ann Johnson (Charley/Facebook)
  110. Chloe Johnson and Keir Shante Johnson (Charley/Charley/Facebook)
  111. Ronald Lee Johnson (Charley/Facebook)
  112. Typhenie Kae Johnson (Charley/Facebook)
  113. Donna Mae Jokumsen (Charley/Facebook)
  114. Kerry Grace Jones (Charley/Facebook)
  115. Juliah Karwitha (Charley/Facebook)
  116. Sebastian Henderson Kelley (Charley/Facebook)
  117. Amanda A. King (Charley/Facebook)
  118. Candyce Laverne Knox (Charley/Facebook)
  119. Asha Kreimer (Charley/Facebook)
  120. Patricia Ann Krieger (Charley/Facebook)
  121. DeOrr Jay Kunz Jr. (Charley/Facebook)
  122. Chase Allen Lackey (Charley/Facebook)
  123. Jacquelyn Landry (Charley/Facebook)
  124. Jesse J. Leopold (Charley/Facebook)
  125. Arturo Lepe (Charley/Facebook)
  126. Dewayne Lewis Jr. (Charley/Facebook)
  127. Maria Jesus Llamas (Charley/Facebook)
  128. Larissa Lone Hill (Charley/Facebook)
  129. Ashley Mariah Loring (Charley/Facebook)
  130. Jessica Michelle Lowery (Charley/Facebook)
  131. Jacob Irvine Lyon (Charley/Facebook)
  132. Anna Bronislawa Maciejewska (Charley/Facebook)
  133. Mackenzie Rae Marken (Charley/Facebook)
  134. Allen Christopher Martin (Charley/Facebook)
  135. Donnie Ray Martin III (Charley/Facebook)
  136. Thomas Edward Mascaro (Charley/Facebook)
  137. Jessica Lynne Masker (Charley/Facebook)
  138. Todd Bradley Jay Mathis (Charley/Facebook)
  139. David A. McAllister (Charley/Facebook)
  140. Karena S. McClerkin (Charley/Facebook)
  141. Patty Lisa McDaniel and Peggy Leslie McDaniel (Charley/Charley/Facebook)
  142. Peggy Anne McGuire (Charley/Facebook)
  143. Carol Joan McHugh (Charley/Facebook)
  144. Alyssa Angelique McLemore (Charley/Facebook)
  145. Christopher Joseph McNeill (Charley/Facebook)
  146. Rachel Marie Mellon (Charley/Facebook)
  147. Eric Israel Mercado (Charley/Facebook)
  148. Cole Younger Middleton (Charley/Facebook)
  149. Kenneth Earl Mohler (Charley/Facebook)
  150. Moreira Elena Monsalve (Charley/Facebook)
  151. Elijah Hassan Moore and Enrique Martin Rios (Charley/Charley/Facebook)
  152. Audrey Louise Moran and Jonathan David Reynoso (Charley/Charley/Facebook)
  153. Hoover Jerome Morris (Charley/Facebook)
  154. Crystal Dawn Morrison (Charley/Facebook)
  155. Richard William Moss (Charley/Facebook)
  156. Christine Abdellah Mustafa (Charley/Facebook)
  157. Dustin Kane Nations (Charley/Facebook)
  158. Norvel Robert Nelson III (Charley/Facebook)
  159. Dan Anh Nguyen, Johnson Nguyen, Anesia Sauta and Tony Sysavanh (Charley/Charley/Charley/Charley/Facebook)
  160. Daniel Michael O’Leary (Charley/Facebook)
  161. Billy H. Oliveira (Charley/Facebook)
  162. James Randolph Olsen (Charley/Facebook)
  163. David Jacquez Ortiz Jr. (Charley/Facebook)
  164. Elaine Park (Charley/Facebook)
  165. Rayman Anthony Patram (Charley/Facebook)
  166. Danyel Lynn Pauley (Charley/Facebook)
  167. Nancy Paulikas (Charley/Facebook)
  168. Lance Eugene Perkins (Charley/Facebook)
  169. Dona Marie Perry (Charley/Facebook)
  170. Samuel Richard Pharis (Charley/Facebook)
  171. Jennifer Lee Poole (Charley/Facebook)
  172. Zachary Bashir Porter (Charley/Facebook)
  173. Beverly Rose Potts (Charley/Facebook)
  174. Debra Elizabeth Puente (Charley/Facebook)
  175. Eric Wayne Pyles (Charley/Facebook)
  176. Beau Rasmussen (Charley/Facebook)
  177. Destry Richard Rhinehart (Charley/Facebook)
  178. Chaz Alfred Richardson (Charley/Facebook)
  179. Robert Rietzel (Charley/Facebook)
  180. LaTonya Dionne Roberts (Charley/Facebook)
  181. Jessie Grace Rubio-Montejano (Charley/Facebook)
  182. Michelle June Russ (Charley/Facebook)
  183. Maria Angelica Salas (Charley/Facebook)
  184. Lucero Sarabia (Charley/Facebook)
  185. Kenneth Albert Saunders (Charley/Facebook)
  186. Logan Drew Schiendelman (Charley/Facebook)
  187. Daniel Leon Scott (Charley/Facebook)
  188. Olga Vyacheslav Segal (Charley/Facebook)
  189. Brian Randall Shaffer (Charley/Facebook)
  190. Prentiss Dant’e Simpson (Charley/Facebook)
  191. Troy Irama Sirat (Charley/Facebook)
  192. Bruce Scott Smith (Charley/Facebook)
  193. Phillip Alan Smith (Charley/Facebook)
  194. Victoria Lynn Smith (Charley/Facebook)
  195. Vickie Annette Smock (Charley/Facebook)
  196. Jason Matthew Spraggins (Charley/Facebook)
  197. Ciara Simone Stacho (Charley/Facebook)
  198. Tina May Stadig (Charley/Facebook)
  199. Natoya Stephens (Charley/Facebook)
  200. Sarah L. Stern (Charley/Facebook)
  201. Tyler Andrew Stice (Charley/Facebook)
  202. Michael Alan Sutherland (Charley/Facebook)
  203. Krista Marie Sypher (Charley/Facebook)
  204. Derrick James Tenorio (Charley/Facebook)
  205. Robert Austin Tharp (Charley/Facebook)
  206. Duane Ryan Thomas (Charley/Facebook/Facebook)
  207. Kristy A. Thomas (Charley/Facebook)
  208. Marla Jean Thomas (Charley/Facebook)
  209. Rose Timperley (Charley/Facebook)
  210. Charles Lee Toliver (Charley/Facebook)
  211. Danielle Tolliver (Charley/Facebook)
  212. Teresa Lynn Towne-Woolard (Charley/Facebook)
  213. William Campbell Underhill (Charley/Facebook)
  214. Seth Allen Uptain (Charley/Facebook)
  215. Alejandro Vasquez (Charley/Facebook)
  216. Brianna Jayde Vibert (Charley/Facebook)
  217. Christopher William Vigil (Charley/Facebook)
  218. Edward William Viola (Charley/Facebook)
  219. Delecia Annette Waddy (Charley/Facebook)
  220. John Clinton Walker (Charley/Facebook)
  221. Wesley A. Wamsganz (Charley/Facebook)
  222. Joseph Weber IV (Charley/Facebook)
  223. Tyler Alan Welling (Charley/Facebook)
  224. Charles Phillip Wheat (Charley/Facebook)
  225. Holly Alcott White (Charley/Facebook)
  226. John Thomas White (Charley/Facebook)
  227. Brandon Steve Williams (Charley/Facebook)
  228. Kenneth Dewayne Williams (Charley/Facebook)
  229. Christopher James Winkler (Charley/Facebook)
  230. Michael Anthony Womack (Charley/Facebook)
  231. Gregory Young (Charley/Facebook)
  232. Joseph Leo Zak (Charley/Facebook)
  233. Carie Melissa Zapletal (Charley/Facebook)

Some general website stuff

So I found two more runaways with active Facebook pages (one Facebook page was sent to me, the other I found on my own). Wearily, I called the NCMEC about it. Shockingly, both girls are, in fact, still actually missing. The NCMEC thanked me for my info about their Facebook pages.

About Pride Month: much as I want to support the LGBTQ population, I don’t think I’m going to do that again. The problem is that, unlike, say, race, being LGBTQ isn’t a distinguishing characteristic, and most of the time I simply don’t know what an MP’s sexual orientation is. I don’t specifically mention it on casefiles anymore unless it’s relevant to the case. And so, I had a hard time coming up with enough LGBTQ missing persons to do one for every day in June, though I’m sure there are a thousand or so of them on my site.

I do, however, plan to run MP cases every day for the Hispanic and Native American populations’ respective months, as I did for the African-Americans and the Asian people. National Hispanic Heritage Month is from September 15 to October 15. Native American Heritage Month is in November.

Thinking aloud with May 14 updates

Yeah, I was up all night working on these. Go me.

  • Suzen Cooper: The cops have GOT to know who this unidentified third party is. After all, Rachael took a plea deal and one of the conditions of the plea was to be honest with the authorities about what happened (though she claims she doesn’t know where Suzen’s body is). So where is this Mystery Man and why hasn’t he been charged?
  • Tamara Lynn Elbertson: Does anyone know what sort of medical conditions can cause that droopy eye? Maybe a stroke? My mom’s first husband (before she met my dad) has something similar and I was told he was dropped on his head when he was a baby, but I’m not sure that was meant entirely seriously.
  • Kito Royal Felton: Not mentioned in the casefile, but Kito may be one of those people where the line between “missing” and “on the run” is pretty thin. Right around the time he disappeared, a woman and her teenage son, Susan and Laurier Myrick, were shot to death in north Tampa and the articles said Kito was sought for questioning. I don’t think the murder has been solved.
    However, he’s listed as missing both on NamUs and FDLE, he doesn’t have any active warrants that I’m aware of, and he was simply wanted for questioning in the murders, not named as a suspect, so…I dunno.
  • Jared Baptista Germano: I studied his Facebook page pretty carefully. I don’t know what happened to him, but I hope he is missing because he wants to be. Jared had a troubled past and an extensive arrest record in Florida and North Carolina.
    His Facebook is public and is pretty open about his background; it says he studied criminal justice in the educational institution called “prison”. Per Jared’s posts, he had a meth problem, which would explain the arrests. But his Facebook says he had gone through rehab, got clean, was working and was generally trying to make a decent go of it.
    Wherever he is, he’s managed to avoid getting arrested again, which is a significant departure from his prior lifestyle. That could mean he’s leading a law-abiding life somewhere or it could mean he’s dead.
    Incidentally, Jared has a brother who looks JUST LIKE him. The brother also has an arrest record and I thought one of his mug shots was of Jared till I realized one person had neck tattoos and the other didn’t. Then I saw a photo on Jared’s Facebook of him and his brother side my by side and was like, “Ah, okay, here’s your double.”
  • Teresa Gossage and Alfred Hoffman Marshal: I’m very proud of getting these two up because their case is notorious in local history and they’re not listed on ANY database. They’re not even on the Missouri Highway Patrol’s list of missing persons, perhaps because they vanished on federal land. I found their names by accident while looking for something else.
    Fort Leonard Wood, by the way, is some 61,000 thousand acres spread over the Missouri Ozarks. My bet is TC and Al are still somewhere on the base. And I’m pretty sure Mr. Thornton is responsible. It would be a very strange coincidence if he wasn’t.
  • Sarah Necaise: She appears to have an active Facebook page — at least, there’s a page under that name, with a young woman who lives in Mississippi and resembles the missing girl. Hmm. An active page doesn’t necessarily mean they’ve been found.

Thinking aloud about this case

So a case I added yesterday, Niija Council, is a “few details” case, but I had plenty of photos, including pics of her tattoos, from Niija’s Facebook page. (She also put a photo of herself on a page called Team Bisexual. Maybe I could profile Niija for Pride Month in June.)

The thing is, Niija has posts on her Facebook from AFTER her official date of disappearance, September 1.

I don’t know whether September 1 was the date she was last physically seen by anyone, or if they just mean she was last seen sometime in September, or what. On September 11 she made four posts:

niijafacebook

Later in the month she changed her profile picture multiple times, the last time on September 23. The comments on her September 16 profile picture change indicate people were pretty worried about her:

niijafacebook2

So I dunno what was going on there. It’s a struggle to piece what exactly happened from what I’ve got to work with. I hope Niija is alive and well somewhere.

Incidentally, I wish I could read the words tattooed on her neck and chest. I posted pictures of them on her casefile but I can’t tell what they say. Here’s larger photos below (the neck picture is from before she added the stars and squiggles) if you want to help me out:

niijanecktattoo

niijachesttattoo

Thank you, Facebook peeps!

As anyone who looks at the Charley Project knows, I try to include as many photos of an MP as possible, and pictures of their tattoos as well, if I can get them.

Occasionally I’ve had to reach out to the crowd on the Charley Project’s Facebook page to ask about photos of an MPs’ tattoos. What happens is I’ll be looking at photos of the person (often on their own personal Facebook page) and see a tattoo but I can’t figure out what it’s supposed to be, or what the words are supposed to say. It doesn’t help that all that I know about tattoos is from watching episodes of Ink Master.

That happened again with this guy. The published info about his disappearance mentioned the “Zoey” tattoo, but the photos on his own Facebook page showed he had others.

I couldn’t figure out what that thing on his chest was supposed to be — I guessed “a stylized snake” or “a fancy ribbon” or suggested it might be something “tribal.” Within seconds, Facebookers responded: it was the astrological sign for Leo, except in reverse, since it was taken with a mirror. (I don’t know anything about astrology either.)

I also was pretty unclear on what the words on his left arm were — it looked like “Joy Meeu” to me. Facebookers answered me immediately and said “Self Made” was much more probable.

Thanks, Facebookers! You contributed invaluable information to William’s casefile. In fact, it was someone on Facebook who verified for me that William was still missing in the first place. I wasn’t 100% sure since the only real source of information was a Facebook page about his disappearance, and it hadn’t been updated since July.

And on another note, I really wish someone would add this guy on NamUs or something. He’s only listed with United Legacy and I can’t find any articles about him or anything. He apparently left of his own accord. but that doesn’t mean he stayed gone of his own accord.

About Pride Month…

People really like this Black History Month thing I’m doing and I plan to do it again next year. I’d also like to do similar things for Native American History Month, Hispanic History Month, etc. (Note to self: find out when those are.)

Some people have suggested I do the same thing for Gay Pride Month, which is in June. I’d love to, but there is a logistical problem: I don’t usually know if an MP on Charley is LGBTQ.

I stopped specifically mentioning people’s gayness in the profiles after I got an email from some guy’s sister screaming at me for bringing it up when it had nothing to do with his disappearance.

Obviously in some cases it would be easy to tell by reading the circumstances of disappearance, but for finding such people in a keyword search I’m not sure what to do.

Anyway, what I mean to say is, can any of you throw the names of some LGBTQ Charley Project cases my way for possible coverage on this blog during Pride Month?

The things that people say

Since I can’t work on Charley today — the site keeps going down, then coming back up, then going down again, making it impossible to get anything done — I thought I’d blog about something that has been bothering me for awhile.

I rarely pay attention to Facebook chatter about missing persons, because for the most part I don’t consider such chatter to be reliable enough to use as a source in my casefiles. I have literally never joined a Facebook groups discussing  some specific case or other, for example.

But awhile back, as in months ago, I happened to be viewing the chatter on such a group for an entirely different reason and saw a post that really made me angry.

I’m not going to say who the missing person was, other than that it was a female child who has been missing for many years. No one has ever been charged in the case. The parents maintain that she was abducted from their home, but many people believe the parents themselves were somehow involved. For the purposes of this blog entry that’s all you need to know.

Some Facebook poster on a group about the case made reference to the fact that, several years after the child’s disappearance, the parents took their remaining children and moved out of state. The poster said something like, “Isn’t this a tacit admission of guilt? Why would they move unless they were sure she wasn’t coming back? Don’t innocent people refuse to EVER move, and stay in the same house forever, hoping their child will return?”

Now, I don’t know whether the parents in this case are guilty or innocent, and for the purposes of the point I’m trying to make, it doesn’t really matter. It just really makes me mad that people would judge them based on the fact that they moved away.

It’s not like anyone ever gives you a rule book on “How to Behave If Your Child Is Kidnapped.” You don’t know how you’re going to act in that situation until it happens to you.

It reminds me of how, after I was raped, certain asshats who read this blog were convinced that I must be making up the story because I didn’t act traumatized enough for them.

Never mind that they only had, like, 1% of the information — they weren’t there, they didn’t know me, all they saw were the words I typed into my blog. But they were publicly calling me a liar and a fraud and making all sorts of judgments about me when they didn’t know anything about it. And not one of them has ever apologized for it.

Yes, it’s true that some parents refuse to move away after their child disappears. I know of one case where not only did a missing girl’s mother refuse to move away, she started sleeping on her living room couch and kept it up for years, because she wanted to be sure she’d hear the knock on the front door if her daughter came home in the middle of the night. (That woman did eventually move, but only because her apartment building was being torn down and she had no choice. She still lives in the neighborhood.)

And it’s also true that some families DO move after their child is taken — in fact, I’ve heard of families that moved specifically because they wanted to get away from all the memories, wanted to get on with their lives, and felt unable to do so while still living at the same address. I’ve known of families who not only left the state but left the COUNTRY.

More to the point, in this particular case, the missing child was an infant. There’s no way she would remember her parents or her home address or phone number or anything like that, even if she was alive and became aware she had been kidnapped and wanted to reach out to her family.

And so they moved. And someone on Facebook was calling them murderers because of it.

Just…think about what you say, people. Try to remember that everything you put online can be read by others, that the very people you’re speculating about can find your musings and read them, that words hurt.

So the crazies were howling at the moon last night

I got approached, via the private message on the Charley Project’s Facebook page, by a young man who said he thought he was a certain child who had disappeared from Florida. I advised him to contact the NCMEC and gave them their tip line number. He claimed the NCMEC were “corrupt” and trying to cover up the disappearance of another child, a girl, who had disappeared from that same county in Florida a few years after the missing boy did.

He said the girl’s parents were trying to help cover up her disappearance too, and that the police knew all about it and weren’t doing anything because they wanted to avoid a lawsuit.

I told him I was unable to assist him and then he accused me of being paid by the girl’s parents to help cover up her disappearance!

crazyconvo

Oh-kay…

He also found a two-year-old blog post of mine that had been shared on Charley’s Facebook page, which mentioned the missing girl, and posted a photograph of a young woman whom he claims is her. Whoever that young woman is, I didn’t want her photo on Charley’s Facebook page, but I couldn’t figure out how to delete his comments so I had to delete the entire post from the Facebook page. Fortunately the only comments on it were his.

Facebook is so useful

I’ve lately found Facebook incredibly useful for missing persons related things lately. These days I’ll always check to see if the MP either had their own Facebook page, or has one set up for them to publicize their disappearance. Mostly it’s useful for finding photographs, but I often find other information too.

Tonight I was taking advantage of a burst of energy to write up cases for the next update. I had a bit of a conundrum with the first one I wrote up: NamUs said his middle name was “Donte” and the FDLE database said it was “Dante.” He’d been missing since 2002 so clearly he hadn’t been on Facebook, but I looked to see if his family had set up a page for him. Turns out they had. There’s not much on it, but I found out that NamUs and FDLE are both wrote and his middle name is “Dant’e.”

So there’s that, anyway. A middle name isn’t a whole lot, but I’d certainly not want to post incorrect info, and before I found the Facebook page it was basically a toss-up between “Dante” and “Donte.”