MP of the week: Kevin Persad

This week’s featured missing person is Kevin Anthony Persad, a 29-year-old man who disappeared while swimming off the coast of St. Petersburg, Florida on September 15, 2010. This case isn’t a big mystery. He’s presumed drowned, but they’ve never found his remains. I hope they are located someday.

Kevin is described as Asian (originally from Trinidad and Tobago, which has a high percentage of Indo-Caribbean people in its population) with black hair and brown eyes, 5’10 tall and 145 pounds. He was working in a customer service job but dreamed of being a fashion designer. Unfortunately his dreams probably ended in the Atlantic that day eleven years ago.

The pitfalls of the trade

It goes with the territory that I hear from mentally ill people on a regular basis, but this past 24 hours have been quite exceptional. I might have acquired a stalker. Again. (Remember her? She kept emailing me for AGES, even after I reported her to the police.)

So this new guy has sent me 17 emails just since yesterday, some of them quite long. He believes he might be a missing child. I’m quite sure he isn’t, but even if he was, he’s also sending the same emails to the relevant law enforcement agency so I can’t do anything more for him than he’s already done himself.

He’s schizophrenic. I’m not even guessing this, because he mentioned his diagnosis in several of the emails. The first one at least made it clear enough what he wanted from me, but since then they’ve degenerated into basically gibberish, such as these two (click for close-up view):

He sent a bunch of his documents too, scanned identity cards and such. So I know his name and address and a lot more besides. Fortunately it’s a long way away from me. Based on the scanned documents he sent me, it appears the authorities where he lives are already aware of him and his problems.

The poor guy clearly needs help but it’s not the kind I can provide. Nothing to do at this point but hit the block button.

MMIW, and more

This past week I’ve had to deal with some godawful fatigue, basically been sleeping all the time. Not sure what’s wrong; I didn’t feel sick, just really tired. I don’t think it was covid. I have no other symptoms; I can still smell and taste food, etc. Today is the time all week that I’ve felt more or less normal.

So here’s some articles:

Dateline is profiling a bunch of missing and murdered Native American women.

The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office in California has put out a list of unsolved murders and disappearances under their jurisdiction.

This month is the 59th anniversary of the 1962 disappearance of Eloise Way from Charleston, South Carolina.

Found this article about the 1981 disappearance of Lonene Rogers from Erie, Pennsylvania. It’s got lots of photos of her. Lonene’s daughter is trying to get the case revived.

The police have identified remains found in Caddo County, Oklahoma as Alvin Stark. He went missing from Chickasha, Oklahoma in May 1988. They have a suspect in his death but the person is deceased.

It’s been one year since the disappearance of 16-year-old Rosalyn Velazquez from Radcliff, Kentucky and the police don’t seem to have a clue where she’s at or what happened to her.

Brittany Michelle Davis’s fiance has been charged in her death. She was reported missing in March 2020 and then added to Charley this past February. “Police said that in April 2021, human remains were found in a wooded area in northeast Georgia and DNA testing has confirmed that they belong to Davis.”

MP of the week: Shannon Hokanson

This week’s featured missing person is Shannon Michelle Hokanson, aka Shannon Baldwin or Baldwin-Hokanson, who disappeared from Enid, Oklahoma on May 27, 2012. She was 29 at the time and would be 38 today. She wasn’t actually reported missing until August 7 of that year. She did maintain weekly contact with her family prior to her disappearance, but all that stopped after May 2012.

Shannon is described as white, with brown hair and brown eyes, between 5’0 and 5’3 and 120 to 150 pounds. She has pierced ears and quite a lot of tattoos. I don’t have photos of the tattoos, but I have plenty of Shannon. There’s a Facebook page for her, which is linked on her casefile and on my list (which, incidentally, gets updated regularly and was updated today).

I don’t have much information on Shannon’s disappearance but I know her family is anxious to know what happened to her. She’s been missing for nine years now.

Hit a win on Facebook yesterday

These days, in addition to checking the missing person’s own Facebook accounts, I often check those of their family members and friends cause sometimes I come across info about the missing person or the circumstances of their disappearance that isn’t available elsewhere. Photos, nicknames, etc.

Yesterday I was writing up a case of a missing woman whose disappearance had a decent amount of coverage on the internet. Articles, listing on her local Crime Stoppers page, listing on NamUs, etc. After I pulled all the info off those sources I checked social media and found even more.

The MP had a tattoo on her chest and one on her upper arm which I was already aware of. I got the best photos I could find of those tattoos off her Facebook account. But then I noticed that, when a friend posted about her disappearance and tagged the MP’s Facebook account, the friend had (probably unintentionally) actually tagged an old account the MP hadn’t used in several years. I had not been aware of this old account, but I had a look, and discovered photos which showed two additional tattoos, on the wrist and thigh, that were not mentioned ANYWHERE ELSE.

I was able to grab a photo of the thigh tattoo, and I mentioned the wrist tattoo in the distinguishing characteristics. (The only photo I could find of it was poor quality and not at a good angle and I couldn’t really tell what the tattoo looked like, so I just noted its presence and didn’t use that photo.)

It may not sound like much but that kind of info could break a case open. Last summer a man on my site was identified because I mentioned, and had a photo of, a tattoo he had that the official “This man is missing” articles, fliers etc. said nothing about.

I thought I’d share this story because I know a lot of people who read this blog are trying to identify dead bodies and make matches with missing persons, so I thought they might try to do what I’m doing (that is, look at the missing person’s loved ones’ posts about their case to find more info).

As for the case, it’s not up yet. The MP disappeared on August 22 of last year, which isn’t quite a year ago yet. But I was doing a bunch of cases from her city and figured I’d write this case up a few days early while I was at it.

AP dump today, first in awhile

Today I updated what felt like about a million missing persons’ age-progression photos. As is the custom, those aren’t crowding up the Charley Project’s updates page; instead I’ll list them below

  1. LaMoine Jordan Allen
  2. April Dawn Andrews
  3. Bob Louis Richard Boyes
  4. Laronda Marie Bronson
  5. Gina Dawn Brooks
  6. Kellie Marie Brownlee
  7. Olivia Addison Edwards-Tuttle
  8. Randi Layton Evers
  9. Robert Joseph Fritz
  10. Jose Francisco Fuentes Pereira
  11. Izar Isaac Godinez Sanchez
  12. Royce Henson
  13. Ethan James Hernandez
  14. Melissa Suzanne Highsmith
  15. Mark Joseph Himebaugh
  16. Alice Fay Jefferson
  17. William Ebenezer Jones III
  18. Karen Beth Kamsch
  19. Dennis Lloyd Martin
  20. Laureen Ann Rahn
  21. Benjamin Melvin Roseland
  22. Aaron Cody Stepp
  23. Marisa Velasco
  24. Mary Anne Wesolowski
  25. Shawn White

MP of the week: Anthony Breedlove

This week’s featured missing person is Anthony Tyrone Breedlove, a 31-year-old man who disappeared from Mobile, Alabama on April 18, 2006. He is described as black, about 5’11 and 155 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes.

And that, unfortunately, is all I can tell you about him, or his disappearance. Even though he didn’t disappear all that long ago by Charley Project standards, I can’t find anything about him or the case in the news, archives, etc. In fact his case has never been updated, even once, since I added it to the database in October 2006. That’s really sad. He must have people who care about him. He must have had a mother. He might have a spouse, or kids.

So I thought I’d put him in the spotlight this week. Maybe someone who knows something will see him.

Francillon Pierre’s case comes to a conclusion

Three-year-old Francillon Pierre was reported missing from North Las Vegas, Nevada on August 2, 1986. His mom and stepmother, Amy Luster and Mahaleel “Lee” Luster, said he disappeared that day from a swap meet.

Thing is, most of the others who were at the swap meet don’t remember seeing him there, and in fact no one outside the family had seen him in a week at least, maybe two weeks. Furthermore, Amy and Lee had already been charged with felony child abuse for severely beating Francillon the previous year. (Why he was returned to their custody I don’t know.)

The case stagnated until 2017, when the police decided to re-examine the evidence they had. In 2019, Amy was charged with her son’s murder. And yesterday the case was settled with a plea bargain, although not a very satisfactory one in my opinion.

Amy (who now goes by Amy Fleming) pleaded no contest to manslaughter. What that means is that she is acknowledging she would probably get convicted if she took the case to trial, but she is still refusing to admit guilt.

And the maximum term she’s facing? Two years. Not even the length of little Francillon’s short life. And Lee? He’s free as far as I know. He hasn’t been charged in this case at all.

I think it’s unlikely the child’s body will ever be recovered. Certainly Amy has no reason to say where she put it. Per this article, Lee said Francillon was in Lake Mead. Which doesn’t help much; Lake Mead is a massive reservoir over 500 feet deep, with 247 square miles of surface water.

MP of the week: Marilyn Dennis

This week’s featured missing person is Marilyn Dennis, who was last seen in Oakland, California in 2011. The CDOJ database gives the date of disappearance as September 27, but NamUs gives the date as August 23. I’m guessing that August 23 was the day Marilyn was last seen, and September 27 was the day she was reported missing. She’s described as black, 5’8 and 250 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes. She was 43 at the time and was last seen wearing a white t-shirt, blue jeans and white shoes.

Little information is available in this case but it’s worth noting that Marilyn had been in “constant” contact with her daughter, and then the contact suddenly stopped after she disappeared. Which is an indication that something went terribly wrong.

Marilyn will have been missing for ten years this month.

Two long-missing people turn up alive and well

Just another one of those “never give up hope” reminders: Nicole Denise Jackson, a Birmingham, Alabama woman who dropped out of sight in 2018, and Sajid Thungal, a man from Kottyam in the state of Kerala in India who was last heard from in 1974, have both resurfaced alive.

Neither of these people were ever listed on the Charley Project: Sajid because he didn’t disappear on American soil, and I’m not sure Nicole was ever officially listed as missing. They also have something else in common, in that both of them vanished after leaving their home countries.

Nicole stopped contacting her family after moving to Germany to be with a guy she met online. Her family finally hired a private investigator who was able to locate and speak to Nicole’s employer and landlord, and as a result Nicole went to the authorities with her ID and verified that she’s ok. She hasn’t gotten in touch with her family though. I don’t know if there were prior family problems, if she’s in a bad situation, if she’s embarrassed or what. But I’m glad to hear she’s alive and has a job and a place to live, anyway.

Sajid left home to make his fortune in the United Arab Emirates, taking a job managing a group of entertainers who were also Indian nationals. At some point in the ensuing few years he lost touch with his family. Then a plane with the entertainers he’d been managing crashed in Mumbai with the loss of all onboard. His family thought, given the circumstances, that Sajid might have died in the crash as well. However, that wasn’t the case.

The truth was that Sajid hadn’t made his fortune after all and was embarrassed by his poverty, and didn’t want to return home with his tail between his legs. And I suppose the more time passed without him writing his family, the more difficult it became to get started, and he just never did it. Until now. His father had passed away in the intervening years but his mom, wife and brothers are still alive.

When a person vanishes voluntarily like that, and then reappears after years have passed, re-integration into the family unit is often difficult. This Washington Post article from 2019 (which I’m quoted in) talks about several real-life cases of a missing person resurfacing and encountering bumps along the way.

The family members, though delighted that their loved one is back in their lives, may also be very angry at the them for causing them so much pain by not picking up the phone. Often, whatever problems that led the no-longer-missing person to go missing in the first place (be it mental illness, family issues, etc.) are still there when they return, and the person might have picked up some new problems along the way while they were missing. Furthermore, they may have built another life for themselves in the meantime, a life which didn’t include their family, and now they have to find a way to fit their family into that life.

It’s a big adjustment and I recommend individual and family therapy in such cases.