The police wouldn’t accept a report for a missing mentally disabled woman for over a year, and other stories

From Alabama: ‘I want my momma’: Family of Montgomery woman missing since 2018 wants answers. Donna Michelle Calloway disappeared in 2018, per the article, though her “few details” Charley Project casefile has it as 2019 — probably because the police wouldn’t take the report till then. I’ll have to update her case.

From Florida: Jupiter police say missing woman’s remains found after husband takes second-degree murder plea. Gretchen Anthony disappeared in March. Her estranged husband, David, was charged with kidnapping and first-degree murder in her case. He’s pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and kidnapping, and told police where to find her body, which was left three miles from Gretchen’s home.

From Kentucky: COLD CASE: Family of William Scott Crain searches for answers 26 years after disappearance. I don’t have William on Charley yet but he was added to NamUs in August. He was 22 when he disappeared from Bowling Green on November 21, 1994.

From New York: Family pleads for safe return of New York woman who’s been missing since October. Lynette Hernandez, a 27-year-old Nassau County resident, said she was moving to Brooklyn to be with a boyfriend. After not hearing from her, her family contacted the boyfriend, who said he hadn’t seen her in almost a week. Two different police departments each claims the other has jurisdiction over the case.

From Washington DC: Unique Harris disappearance: Man charged with murder a decade after woman goes missing and Arrest made in cold case murder 10 years after DC mother vanished. Unique RaQuel-Leona Harris, a 24-year-old mother of two, was last seen in 2010. Her body has never been found. The suspect is someone I’ve never heard of before, but he was an acquaintance of Unique’s and had been on the police radar for years, not the least cause he left his DNA at the crime scene.

From New Zealand: Cold Case murder mystery: What happened to Marion Granville? A mother of three young children, she disappeared in 1980, at the age of 29. Her partner at the time is asking for anyone with information to come forward. He believes she’s dead and just wants to be able to properly bury her.

From Singapore: Choa Chu Kang girl disappears in 2002, allegedly calls 1 year later: ‘Someone won’t let me come back’. Tina Lim Xin Ying was 14 when she disappeared while en route to visit her sick grandfather. She hasn’t been seen since, and the police are still not sure whether the phone call was from her.

6 thoughts on “The police wouldn’t accept a report for a missing mentally disabled woman for over a year, and other stories

  1. Amanda December 23, 2020 / 4:50 pm

    Regarding Jessica Darling Dickson’s case file, specifically Jessica’s tattoo running down her spine: those 7 heart/star designs are actually a symbol called a Heartagram, made popular by the Finnish rock band HIM; it’s basically their logo. I’ve been a fan of the band for over 17 years, so I recognized it immediately. Maybe you could edit that into the ‘distinguishing characteristics’ section?

    https://charleyproject.org/case/jessica-darling-dickson

    • Amanda December 23, 2020 / 5:01 pm

      Also, the link to Jessica’s personal Facebook page is incorrect, it’s actually https://www.facebook.com/Darling2113; you have it as the “Help Find Jessica” page. 🙂

  2. Patrick Kerrigan December 23, 2020 / 7:40 pm

    I don’t understand a police department not taking a missing person report in this day and age. The most important part of a police officers job is conducting patrols, and taking reports.

    Reporting writing is important to document incidents thstctook place. It also provides documentation of what the agency is doing. Also, it identifies problem areas that need more attention.

    Also, it very important when it comes to the use of force. It’s important to tell, what type of call you got. What you saw when you arrived at the incident. And what type of use of force you used.

    So, delaying taking a report, is one way of cooking the books. This way you can, claim a reduced crime.problem.

  3. Patrick Kerrigan December 26, 2020 / 10:42 pm

    I checked several online directories for information on Donna Calloway. One of them showed a bunch of phone numbers with the area code 334, for Montgomery, Alabama. However, one phone number had a 508 area code, which covers part of Massachusetts.

    Yet, there was no record of her living in Massachusetts. She supposedly had a P.O. Box office n Bradenton, Florida.

    Also, she was supposedly living in a single family townhouse at 1147 Bragg Street in Montgomery. Which appears to be close to Interstate- 65.

    I would pass this along to the police. But, they were not concerned about her disappearance for over a year and two months.

    I like that they wanted proof that she had a disability. I guess her sister words were not enough. Maybe, if they conducted a prompt investigation they could have verified that she was disabled.

    I guess if you call them about someone being shot in the street, that you have to determine if they are alive or deceased before they come to see for themselves and establish a crime scene.

    At the VA, we would have to gather all kinds of information in regards to a missing patient, including determining their diagnosis and whether they were a threat to themselves or others.

    Then we would call our chief, and run what we had by him. If we had enough information then he would tell us to notify the hospital director for his authorization to notify the Chicago Police Departnent.

    We would include the names of medical and if necessary psychiatric staff, and their opinions.

    So, I would love the mayor and police chief to explain why it took them over a year to start to investigate her disappearance.

    The article should have included interviews with the mayor and police chief. But, then like in Chicago, and the State of Illinois, the media does not challenge the political ruling class.

    They would not point out that the emperor has no clothes.

  4. Patrick Kerrigan December 26, 2020 / 10:42 pm

    I checked several online directories for information on Donna Calloway. One of them showed a bunch of phone numbers with the area code 334, for Montgomery, Alabama. However, one phone number had a 508 area code, which covers part of Massachusetts.

    Yet, there was no record of her living in Massachusetts. She supposedly had a P.O. Box office n Bradenton, Florida.

    Also, she was supposedly living in a single family townhouse at 1147 Bragg Street in Montgomery. Which appears to be close to Interstate- 65.

    I would pass this along to the police. But, they were not concerned about her disappearance for over a year and two months.

    I like that they wanted proof that she had a disability. I guess her sister words were not enough. Maybe, if they conducted a prompt investigation they could have verified that she was disabled.

    I guess if you call them about someone being shot in the street, that you have to determine if they are alive or deceased before they come to see for themselves and establish a crime scene.

    At the VA, we would have to gather all kinds of information in regards to a missing patient, including determining their diagnosis and whether they were a threat to themselves or others.

    Then we would call our chief, and run what we had by him. If we had enough information then he would tell us to notify the hospital director for his authorization to notify the Chicago Police Departnent.

    We would include the names of medical and if necessary psychiatric staff, and their opinions.

    So, I would love the mayor and police chief to explain why it took them over a year to start to investigate her disappearance.

    The article should have included interviews with the mayor and police chief. But, then like in Chicago, and the State of Illinois, the media does not challenge the political ruling class.

    They would not point out that the emperor has no clothes.

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