And then this happened the other day

So yesterday I got a call from a very confused man who worked in the Internal Affairs Bureau at the Harris County Sheriff’s Office in Texas.

You see, the HCSO has a section on their website devoted to missing persons. It has eleven pages of people listed, but due to some apparent errors in the code, you could only see the first page. There’s buttons at the bottom to click to page two, three etc, but they didn’t work. When you clicked, nothing happened.

I found a drop-down menu on the HCSO site labeled “contact us” and underneath that, a link to “online complaints.” So I filled in the complaint form explaining the problem and sent it in. And then the next day IAB called.

It turns out the complaint form is meant for filing complaints of police misconduct.

The poor guy didn’t understand at first what I was complaining about, and was asking if I’d like an officer to come to my house to discuss the problem. I was like “It’s probably just a typo, and also I live in Indiana.” But I was able to get my point across. He said he’d sent a note to IT asking them to correct the issue.

And lo, it has been fixed! You can now view eleven pages of missing people from Harris County, cases dating back to 2003.

MP of the week: Ashley Conroy

This week’s missing person of the week is really two people: both seven-month-old Ashley Nicole Conroy, whose name and photo are on the Charley Project’s frontpage, and her mom, Jennifer Lynn Conroy, who was only fifteen years old. They disappeared together from Kansas City, Missouri on December 14, 1993. Eleven days before Christmas.

There’s been very little said about this case from what I can find. Nothing in the newspaper archives. I wonder how long it took before the police finally stopped assuming Jennifer had just run away. Now, foul play is suspected in their cases.

Because so little information is available in the case, it’s hard to even speculate as to what happened. I do wonder about Ashley’s father, whoever he was. Jennifer was only fourteen when Ashley was conceived, and the age of consent in Missouri (at least at the present time) is seventeen. If Ashley’s father was older than seventeen, he could have gone to prison, which would have been an excellent motive for him to make both of them disappear. But I have no idea who the father was.

If anyone knew Jennifer, I’d love to have them post in the comments here. If still alive, Jennifer would be 42 today. Ashley would be 27.