I’m on the home stretch

So I’m still deep cleaning and adding races/sexes but I’m starting to approach the finish line. I’ve got about 1500 cases left to cover, or 75 groups of twenty. (On the dashboard the pages are grouped into twenty.)

I worked a lot of yesterday and all night long doing this. It’s mind-numbing but I’m almost done and then normal activity will resume.

Thank you for your patience! Due to an error that was no one’s fault, I wound up having to do the first 4,000 cases over again, so this has been taking longer than I had anticipated, but it is a great improvement I believe.

Native American Heritage Month: Darian Nevayaktewa

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Darian Rae Nevayaktewa, a 19-year-old man of Hopi Pueblo heritage who disappeared from Kykotsmovi, Arizona on June 19, 2008.

Wikipedia says Kykotsmovi Village, also called K-Town, is the seat of government for the Hopi tribe on their reservation, which covers 1.5 million acres across three mesas and two counties.

Unfortunately I don’t have any more information on this case.

Native American Heritage Month: Delema Sits Poor

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Delema Lou Sits Poor, a twelve-year-old girl who disappeared in 1974 from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. She’s of Oglala Sioux heritage and her nickname in 1974 was Babe.

Pine Ridge is one of the poorest places in the entire U.S. and has numerous other socioeconomic problems. To quote from Wikipedia:

The population of Pine Ridge suffer health conditions, including high mortality rates, depression, alcoholism, drug abuse, malnutrition and diabetes, among others. Reservation access to health care is limited compared to urban areas, and it is not sufficient. Unemployment on the reservation hovers between 80% and 85%, and 49% of the population live below the federal poverty level. Many of the families have no electricity, telephone, running water, or sewage systems; and many use wood stoves to heat their homes, depleting limited wood resources.

The exact date of Delema’s disappearance is no longer known with just uncertainty, just sometime in February that year. She reportedly disappeared while walking “on a back road Oglala to Manderson” in subzero temperatures. You might wonder how they know the temperature at the time she disappeared but not the date, but my guess that just about EVERY day in February in Pine Ridge, North Dakota is subzero.

According to Google Maps, there are two routes you can drive between Manderson and Oglala; one is shorter in distance, 23.5 miles, but takes an hour, and the 40.2 mile roundabout way is shorter to drive. Either one is a VERY significant distance for a child to walk in subzero temperatures. Why was she out that day? Was she running away from something, or to something?

It’s extremely sad that a twelve-year-old girl’s disappearance seems to have been forgotten about by the authorities, but it doesn’t surprise me all that much. The situation of missing and murdered indigenous women has only recently become a topic attracting national attention.

Native American Heritage Month: Nathan Yazzie

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Nathan Francis Yazzie, who disappeared from Farmington, NM in March 2014. I don’t have tribal info for him.

Yeah, so on Namus and on the New Mexico DPS site, the date of his disappearance is given as March 12. However, Nathan, or someone posing as him, created a Facebook page on March 13 and made several posts that day and the following, including:

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The Facebook activity stopped March 14, at least publicly. A police blotter I found notes the date of his disappearance as March 31, which might explain where the “March 13” mistake came from; someone transposed the numbers and the error trickled down to all the other sources.

He remains listed as a missing person but I can’t find out much about him or his disappearance.

 

Native American Heritage Month: Marion Gonangnan

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Marion Gonangnan, a 32-year-old woman who disappeared from Anchorage in 2003. I don’t have tribal info for her. The site Justice For Native Women says she had spent a lot of her life in the lower 48 states, was unhappy in Alaska and wanted to return to California, where she’d spent her younger years.

Marion may have been suffering from an ectopic pregnancy at the time of her disappearance. Basically, that happens when the fertilized egg implants in the fallopian tube rather than the uterus. The only treatment is to terminate the pregnancy; if left untreated, this is a life-threatening condition.

That alone would make her disappearance concerning, but Marion’s lifestyle indicates foul play could have been involved in her case. She had a history of drug abuse, sex work and “residential instability”, and a violent relationship with her boyfriend. (He was in jail when she went missing, though, so he isn’t a suspect.)

It seems likely that Marion is deceased. If still alive, she would be 48 today.

Native American Heritage Month: Daniel Guyton

In honor of Native American Heritage Month I’m featuring a Native American missing person for every day in the month of November. Today’s missing person is Daniel Lydell Guyton, who was 38 when he disappeared from Green Bay, Wisconsin on November 15, 2017. I do not have tribal information for him.

It sounds like Guyton just left on his own: he told his employer he was moving out of state. However, given his disabilities — schizophrenia and brittle bone disease — and his arrest history, it’s surprising and concerning that he hasn’t had any contact at all with law enforcement (or, apparently, doctors) since 2017.

On his Facebook page (which also hasn’t been updated since 2017) he calls himself Lakwaun Avarius.