Black History Month: Kimberly and Sarah Boyd and Linda McCord

In honor of Black History Month I’m profiling one African-American MP every day on this blog for the month of February. Today’s case is actually three disappearances: 32-year-old Sarah W. Boyd, her friend, 31-year-old Linda McCord, and Sarah’s daughter, two-year-old Kimberly Janis Boyd, who disappeared somewhere between Dorchester County and Orangeburg County, South Carolina on April 3, 1987.

They had gone to a gospel concert and were last seen driving back home. They never arrived and their car was found abandoned in Dorchester County on April 5.

I haven’t been able to find a whole lot on this case. It seems like it should have gotten SOME media attention; I mean, three people gone missing at once, and Kimberly was just adorable, a little doll. It’s entirely possible there was significant attention and I just haven’t found the news yet; this was thirty years ago, after all.

It sounds like the three of them may have been harmed by someone they stopped to help. If evidence was properly preserved and could be analyzed with modern forensic techniques, the case could be very solvable.

7 thoughts on “Black History Month: Kimberly and Sarah Boyd and Linda McCord

  1. Christiegroves71@gmail.com February 1, 2019 / 1:10 am

    I hope this was not a racially motivated case, hopefully they just got lost on the side of the road or something and died of exposure, or got hit and were flung to the side of the road somewhere. This is a terrible sad case, just awful. I hope they are found someday.

  2. aulelia February 1, 2019 / 9:06 am

    Thanks for sharing. Such a sad story

  3. Gomez Toth February 1, 2019 / 10:44 am

    I wonder if the abandoned car was disabled? If so they might have accepted ‘assistance’ from a stranger, perhaps thinking that even with a baby in tow two adult women could handle whatever might happen. But if the car was operational, they would likely have been lured/tricked into stopping, and then abducted. Neither situation helps to explicitly resolve what happened to them, but perhaps there are/were perps known to LE who engaged in staged auto problems to lure victims…or conversely known perps who trawled the roads for disabled cars to target victims.

  4. JustinChristoph February 1, 2019 / 11:04 am

    I was living in Charleston, South Carolina when they went missing. It was in the local newspapers for a long time.

  5. J. Geoffrey Thomas Jr. February 1, 2019 / 10:14 pm

    unfortunately cases on african-american males and females don’t get near the attention they deserve. had they been blonde haired and blue eyed, it would still be gettin national exposure.

  6. Patrick Kerrigan February 2, 2019 / 8:28 pm

    I agree with J. Geoffrey Thomas Jr. comments. Yet, I don’t certain elected officials saying anything. Pus the main stream media ignores the situation. But, they are too busy keeping up with the trials and tribulations of certain entertainmnt figures.

  7. Jim February 3, 2019 / 2:22 pm

    I admit that 1990 was brewing up hatred, racism, and so many other prejudices. I hate to say it, but it’s our reality. These women, and that adorable baby girl, were most likely targeted.

    Unless it was an early road-rage incident? That report of a car seen close to them? Yeah.

    I just don’t see them running off.

    And their auto being disabled? Was there even an investigation into what the heck was wrong with the danged car!?

    We really need to improve our reactions to all cases like this one. No matter who those victims might be!

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