A pretty discouraging diagnosis

So last weekend I became horribly sick again. You know, less than a month after last time. The anti-nausea medications weren’t doing squat and I was afraid it was going to last forever like last time, I went rushing off to the hospital — the only place that was open over the holiday weekend. And they told me they think I have something called Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome.

As far as I can tell,¬†Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome is the same kind of rubbish diagnosis that New Daily Persistent Headache is: it basically means “you keep puking on a regular basis and we have no idea what’s wrong.”

The doctor said my stomach, kidneys, pancreas, gall bladder, etc., were all “happy as clams.” Yet I keep throwing up and I keep having these spells of throwing up and that’s been happening for years now. I had a scope done five years ago and nothing untoward was discovered.

I saw my family doctor on Tuesday and they think the same thing. They’re trying to figure out what to do about it and I’m feeling very discouraged. They tried to get me to swallow an anti-nausea pill in the office and the mere thought of trying to do so made me puke again. (After puking, I swallowed the pill and kept it down. Go figure.)

I feel much better today, and was able to get some updates in, but the thought of this happening over and over and over and over again is very discouraging.

There are certain unpleasant physical sensations I can sort of put out of my head and carry on with life, but nausea’s not one of them. Furthermore, I am concerned about my medicine. I have to take four pills every morning and four every evening and that’s very important. I need to be able to take those medications and keep them down or, within a few days, I turn into a nervous mess and terrible things start happening. Once, like three years ago, I was throwing up almost every day for a solid month, and as a result could not take my medicine, and by the end of the month I’d slid into a terrible depression and the house was a tip because I was too depressed to clean it and I was a complete wreck as well.

So, I hope there’s something that can prevent this stuff from happening but I’m not optimistic.

On the bright side, I got a lovely email from someone working with the U.S. Marshals who complimented my work. I also had a lovely conversation with a lady who is trying to set up a database for missing Native Americans and wanted to know how it’s done, and I told her all my trade secrets.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Song Joseph

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I’m profiling one Asian or Pacific Islander MP every day for the month of May. Today’s case (which was supposed to run last night but didn’t; I forgot to schedule it and it was stuck in drafts) is Song Im Joseph, a 20-year-old Korean-American woman who disappeared from Rehoboth Beach, Delaware on June 8, 1975.

Song had been born and raised in South Korea and moved to the U.S. in late 1974 after she married an American serviceman, Alton Joseph. By the time of her disappearance, mere months into their marriage, the couple was having unspecified problems, and Song told people she was being followed around by a Korean-speaking man.

It really doesn’t look good for her and I feel deeply sorry for her. I mean, she was a young woman who moved to another country, another culture, to have a happy life, a better life than she might have expected in South Korea, and then everything so rapidly went sideways.

This concludes my Asian Pacific American Heritage Month posts. See you next year.