Analytics

Preston signed me up for a Google Analytics account. The figures it’s spitting out are pretty interesting. My previous stats thingy, which came with my host, only tracked the number of visitors. This tracks a lot more.

For example, a whopping 53.2% of visitors view the Charley Project on a phone, and 9.5% on a tablet. Only a little over one-third of viewers — 37.3% — are using a PC. Good thing the site is now mobile friendly!

The overwhelming majority — 78.4% — of viewers come from the United States, and most of the rest come from the UK, Canada and Australia. Not a surprise. What’s more surprising is the fifth-place country, which is…Italy. (Followed by Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, Ireland and Mexico.)

Viewers have come from such far-flung places as Turkmenistan, South Sudan, Nepal, and Cyprus.

So…cool, I guess.

The things that people say

Since I can’t work on Charley today — the site keeps going down, then coming back up, then going down again, making it impossible to get anything done — I thought I’d blog about something that has been bothering me for awhile.

I rarely pay attention to Facebook chatter about missing persons, because for the most part I don’t consider such chatter to be reliable enough to use as a source in my casefiles. I have literally never joined a Facebook groups discussing¬† some specific case or other, for example.

But awhile back, as in months ago, I happened to be viewing the chatter on such a group for an entirely different reason and saw a post that really made me angry.

I’m not going to say who the missing person was, other than that it was a female child who has been missing for many years. No one has ever been charged in the case. The parents maintain that she was abducted from their home, but many people believe the parents themselves were somehow involved. For the purposes of this blog entry that’s all you need to know.

Some Facebook poster on a group about the case made reference to the fact that, several years after the child’s disappearance, the parents took their remaining children and moved out of state. The poster said something like, “Isn’t this a tacit admission of guilt? Why would they move unless they were sure she wasn’t coming back? Don’t innocent people refuse to EVER move, and stay in the same house forever, hoping their child will return?”

Now, I don’t know whether the parents in this case are guilty or innocent, and for the purposes of the point I’m trying to make, it doesn’t really matter. It just really makes me mad that people would judge them based on the fact that they moved away.

It’s not like anyone ever gives you a rule book on “How to Behave If Your Child Is Kidnapped.” You don’t know how you’re going to act in that situation until it happens to you.

It reminds me of how, after I was raped, certain asshats who read this blog were convinced that I must be making up the story because I didn’t act traumatized enough for them.

Never mind that they only had, like, 1% of the information — they weren’t there, they didn’t know me, all they saw were the words I typed into my blog. But they were publicly calling me a liar and a fraud and making all sorts of judgments about me when they didn’t know anything about it. And not one of them has ever apologized for it.

Yes, it’s true that some parents refuse to move away after their child disappears. I know of one case where not only did a missing girl’s mother refuse to move away, she started sleeping on her living room couch and kept it up for years, because she wanted to be sure she’d hear the knock on the front door if her daughter came home in the middle of the night. (That woman did eventually move, but only because her apartment building was being torn down and she had no choice. She still lives in the neighborhood.)

And it’s also true that some families DO move after their child is taken — in fact, I’ve heard of families that moved specifically because they wanted to get away from all the memories, wanted to get on with their lives, and felt unable to do so while still living at the same address. I’ve known of families who not only left the state but left the COUNTRY.

More to the point, in this particular case, the missing child was an infant. There’s no way she would remember her parents or her home address or phone number or anything like that, even if she was alive and became aware she had been kidnapped and wanted to reach out to her family.

And so they moved. And someone on Facebook was calling them murderers because of it.

Just…think about what you say, people. Try to remember that everything you put online can be read by others, that the very people you’re speculating about can find your musings and read them, that words hurt.

Black History Month: William Weatherall

In honor of Black History Month I’m profiling one African-American MP every day on this blog for the month of February. Today’s case is William “Buster” Weatherall, who disappeared from Los Angeles on June 6, 1991. He was 85 years old.

The circumstances are suspicious: Buster was expecting a call from a friend, but when his friend called his house, no one picked up. He left his dogs abandoned and unfed, and his front gate open. He lived alone at the time of his disappearance, and I couldn’t find anything saying he had dementia or anything like that.

Buster would be well over 100 years old if he was still alive, but I think he’s still 85.