Not on Namus, Part IV

As per before, an * at the end of a name means their case is in NamUs but without a photo attached.

Also, I added a new photo of Rochelle Denise Battle just now.

  1. Majestees Aaron
  2. Henry Peter Ackerman
  3. Walter Thomas Ackerson Jr.
  4. Lilia Edith Anguiano
  5. Christopher J. Benedetto
  6. Robin Nadine Benedict
  7. Frank Lee Black Jr.
  8. Christine Blackburn-Wiles
  9. Bruce Blackwood
  10. Edna Laverne Blodgett
  11. Andrea Nicole Boyette
  12. Jake Branam
  13. Kelly Branam
  14. Kedrian Lenard Briggs
  15. Corey Lynn Brooks
  16. Amanda Victoria Brown
  17. Nicole Lynn Bryner
  18. Scott Murray Campbell
  19. Enedelia Castro*
  20. Curtis Eugene Chillingworth
  21. Marjorie Croude McKinley Chillingworth
  22. Paul Steven Cosner
  23. Jasmine Michelle Cruz
  24. Joan Audrey Davis
  25. Peter Davis
  26. Edwin Craig Dowell
  27. Christine Claudette Dumont
  28. Yadira Espinoza
  29. Averie Grace Evans
  30. Sarah J. Feather
  31. Marcia Ann Forsberg
  32. William Gaffney
  33. Ruben Gallegos
  34. Scott Gamble
  35. Jeffrey Dean Gerald
  36. Claudine Jaquier Gifford
  37. Elvia Veronica Gomez Zapien*
  38. Andrea R. Gonzalez
  39. Kristy Ann Green
  40. Kevin R. Harkins
  41. Audrey Lynn Harris
  42. James Lee Haynes
  43. Lesley Anne Herring
  44. Larry Joe Hicks
  45. James P. Higham III
  46. Joel Hoag
  47. William Hoag
  48. Melvin Charles Horst
  49. Cheryl Huff
  50. John Gregory Hughes
  51. Shara Hunter
  52. Elisabeth Ann Huster
  53. Jack Irwin
  54. A’Shia Monique Jenkins
  55. Hevin Dakota James Lee Jenkins*
  56. Virginia Jewell
  57. Randy Johnson
  58. Samuel Kairy
  59. Karl Terry Karbowski
  60. Mary Sue Kitts
  61. Carl Stephen Knight
  62. Patricia Denise Knight
  63. Bongak Koja
  64. Clifford Lambert
  65. Janeice Langs
  66. Shaun Clifford Laughlin
  67. Arturo Lepe
  68. Christopher Lerch
  69. Peggy Ann Lerch
  70. Ronald George Levin
  71. James Dupree Lewis Jr.
  72. Jennifer Long
  73. Kimberly Lashawn Mack
  74. Irina Malezhik
  75. Elizabeth Marriott
  76. Joseph Arthur Martin Jr.
  77. Joseph Patrick Martin
  78. Jorge Aguilar Mata
  79. Richard Edward McCrary
  80. Michael McDowell
  81. Arthur Gerald Noske
  82. Oscar Ochoa
  83. Melvin Pittman
  84. Christopher Craig Prows
  85. Michelle Kelly Pulsifer
  86. Glenda Diane Quisenberry
  87. Heidi Ann Rhodes
  88. Carl Wayne Rotstein
  89. Alejandro Sanchez
  90. Federico Sanchez Jr.*
  91. Pamela Beth Schlitz
  92. Daniel Sites
  93. Stephen E. Smith
  94. Thaddeus John Szczypta
  95. Mitchell Szegi
  96. Ernest Taylor
  97. Zoey Kainoa Thomas
  98. Tate Torres
  99. Carlos M. Trotz
  100. Alvin Turner
  101. Daniel Torres Ventura
  102. Edward William Viola
  103. Leo Roy Whitehead*
  104. Wendell Williams
  105. Patrick Albert Wright*
  106. Evon Young
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Flashback Friday: David Sampson

This week’s Flashback Friday case is David Robert Sampson, a 21-year-old student at the University of Washington who disappeared from Seattle on March 1, 1977. I don’t know his major, but he was interested in “botany, hiking and environmental issues,” so perhaps it was something like biology.

Indications are Sampson left of his own accord; he took several possessions, including survival gear, a Bible and other religious materials, but no ID or cash. He may have joined some kind of cult; his case reminds me a bit of Robert Spurlock‘s. (I ought to do a Make-a-List Monday of cases where the MP is thought to have joined a cult.) It’s worth noting that Sampson disappeared at the tail end of the hippie era, and it sounds like he might have found that lifestyle agreeable.

But if he did join a cult, where has he been since 1977? Canada maybe? But if he left the country, how’d he cross the border without any identification?

I was able to get Sampson’s date of birth today from the Washington State Missing Person Search database. The anonymous author of the excellent Whereabouts Still Unknown blog has an entry for him as well. I couldn’t find anything about his disappearance in the newspaper archives, though, which isn’t surprising giving it was 1977 and he was a college student and a man at that. That profile of missing person is rarely covered in the news even today.

If he is still alive, and he may very well be, David Sampson would be 62 today. There’s a good chance his parents would be dead by now, but perhaps he has siblings or cousins who are still hoping for resolution in his case.

A happy announcement

I’m pleased to announce that Preston Winfrey, a Missouri father of three and founder of a remote software and web development company called Ready Launch (website | Facebook) has volunteered to redesign the Charley Project’s website and drag it into the 21st century. At present, technology-wise, it’s stuck firmly in the mid-1990s.

This has actually been on the books for awhile but I didn’t want to say anything because I wasn’t sure it would go anywhere. I can’t pay Preston for this, so this is a strictly volunteer project, and in the past I’ve had people promise to redesign my site and then lose interest and disappear. But now I’m confident that Preston will follow through.

Preston is, of course, a true crime enthusiast and said he wants to “help in any way I can bring visibility to missing persons and want to fight for justice for those who can’t fight for themselves.” One of my own personal mottoes (a quote often misattributed to Theodore Roosevelt) is: “Do what you can with what you have, where you are.” With his mad skillz at programming, Preston is doing what he can with what he has where he’s at, and that’s all you can expect from any of us.

He has already shown me a prototype of what the site might look like — with help from web designer Rick Brewer of S03 Creative.

He wants to make my website mobile-friendly, and searchable in all kinds of ways, and both more user-friendly and operator-friendly. I look forward to working with him.

Strike that, reverse it: murder-without-a-body cases

It has been brought to my attention that Walter Shannon Stevenson, whose case I resolved yesterday, has not been found after all. This article, from which I got the original information, has issued a retraction. A suspect, Jeffrey May, has been charged with his murder, but Walter’s case is currently a no-body homicide.

I hope the body turns up soon. In the meantime, I’ll remove the resolved notice and put up Walter’s casefile again with the next update (probably today).

And speaking of murder-without-a-body cases, it looks like the only indicted suspect in Katherine and Sheila Lyon‘s 1975 disappearances is about to plead guilty. Some articles:

This isn’t the end of the story — there’s another suspect who is also believed to have been involved — but it might be the beginning of the end.

As of this writing, the Corpus Delicti section of Charley — my three lists of murder-without-a-body cases currently on the website — has approximately 615 names. (I saw “approximately” because a few names are on more than one list due to multiple defendants and multiple outcomes. I wish I could find the outcomes for more of those cases on List Three, which surely must have been resolved by now.)

For more details about murder-without-a-body cases, I highly recommend you check out Tad DiBiase’s website (particularly this PDF) and book.