Flashback Friday: Gloria Korzon

This week’s Flashback Friday case is Gloria Suzanne Korzon, who disappeared from Warrington, Pennsylvania on March 9, 1981. The case is a very sad but pretty typical example of domestic violence.

Due to her husband William’s attempt to cover up her absence, she wasn’t reported missing until July of that year. When Gloria’s family reported her disappearance to the police and they asked William about it, he lied and said she was visiting an aunt out of state.

Furthermore, the couple’s marriage had been pretty terrible. The police had been called to their home eight times, and Gloria left behind a list of times when William allegedly assaulted her; the list was three pages long.

William is, obviously, the prime suspect in his wife’s disappearance, but no charges have ever been filed in her case.

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MP of the week: Dorien Thomas

This week’s featured missing person is Dorien Deon Thomas, a nine-year-old boy who disappeared from Amarillo, a city in the Texas panhandle, on October 26, 1998. He was (probably) going for a bike ride around the neighborhood when he vanished, and, unusually, the bike disappeared with him and was never found.

Dorien will have been missing for twenty years next year. He’d be 28 now, if he is still alive. I suppose there is no hard evidence that he isn’t; Jaycee Dugard turned up alive after quite a long time. The most recent news article I found on his case was from last fall.

Make-a-List Monday: Females with masculine names

This list is of missing girls and women with first names that are much more common among men. For whatever reason it’s more acceptable to give a girl a masculine name than a boy a feminine name. Nevertheless, there aren’t too many of these. I’ve decided to go by sound rather than spelling — i.e. including names like “Jeri” because it sounds identical to the far more common, and masculine, “Jerry.”

What constitutes a “masculine” name is, of course, entirely my subjective opinion. Part of it depends on what time period the person was born; what was considered a boy’s name in one generation might have become a girl’s name by the next generation. It’s also a matter of culture/country, too.

  1. Stevie Danielle Bates
  2. Jonne Ann Boe
  3. Jeri Anne Brommels
  4. Darrian H. Burdine
  5. Jimmie Lynn Caine
  6. MarkLenny Candelario
  7. Jonni Clemett
  8. Micky Colman
  9. Francis D. Crownover
  10. Dail Boxley Dinwiddie
  11. Tyler Lauren Domingue
  12. Frankie Lyvonne Duvall
  13. Willie Fay Elliot
  14. Terrill Suzanne Girard
  15. Billie Lynn Groff
  16. Frankie Darlene Horsley
  17. Frankie Viola Hurst
  18. Willie Mae Jackson
  19. Geri Johnson
  20. Noel Annette Marcotte
  21. Marlo Keolalani Moku
  22. Germaine Odius
  23. Dean Marie Peters
  24. Cory Marie Rubio
  25. Saunders Cloie Rymer
  26. Salum Nicole Satterwhite
  27. Eddy Segall
  28. Shawn Desiree Short
  29. Billie Jo Smith
  30. Jeffrey Lynn Smith
  31. Marcus Maxine Stalnaker
  32. Rae Meichelle Tener
  33. Tyler Marie Thomas
  34. Micki Jo West
  35. Jonnie Renee White
  36. Jerry Frances Yell
  37. Shaun Young

Select It Sunday: Ke’Shaun Vanderhorst

Kristen Y. selected Ke’Shaun Bryant Vanderhorst as this week’s Select It Sunday case. Like Peter Kema‘s and Relisha Rudd‘s, this is a case that really gets to me. Also like with those two, it’s as if the system opened up whole knew cracks just for Ke’Shaun to fall through. What’s more, the 22nd anniversary of this adorable little boy’s disappearance is tomorrow, Monday. He vanished from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on September 25, 1995, at the age of two years and three months.

I wrote about the case on my blog seven years ago, inserting my own commentary into Ke’Shaun’s Charley Project casefile. Since then there’s been an additional development: last October, Tina was charged with murder — not in Ke’Shaun’s disappearance, but in the case of a 64-year-old man whom she allegedly stabbed 77 times before setting his body on fire. She was homeless at the time, and was charged with┬ámurder, robbery, arson and “causing a catastrophe.”

I can’t find anything else about the case and don’t know if it has yet been resolved. It often takes a long time to resolve murder cases, as long as several years, so I wouldn’t be surprised if Tina is still awaiting trial. It’s been less than a year since she was charged, after all.

I wonder if this murder charge has prompted authorities to take another look at Ke’Shaun’s case. I can only hope so. Tina needs to pay for what she did to her son, and 2 1/2 to 7 years for child endangerment isn’t nearly enough.

If he is still alive — and he almost certainly is not — Ke’Shaun would be 24 years old today.