A question

I was on Newspapers.com and ran the name of a person who disappeared in the early seventies. I knew she wore dentures, although she was only in her thirties. I just found out why: when she was in her twenties she was in a car accident and knocked out several of her teeth. I found an article about the accident; she was cited for driving without a license and failure to maintain a safe distance.

My question: does it make a difference how a person lost their teeth? Would they be able to tell by looking at a jawbone whether teeth merely fell out, or were pulled out, or outright knocked out? Cause if they can tell if teeth were knocked out, it’s worth mentioning that accident on her casefile.

Does anyone know? Thanks!

Sorry guys, I promise I’ll update today

Yeah, I meant to start updating Charley again on Sunday and that didn’t happen. I was a lot more tired from that trip than I thought, and it kind of flipped my sleep schedule around as well. I don’t use my computer much if at all after about nine o’clock p.m. because Michael gets home from work then.

Was going to update yesterday after going to my therapy appointment. I would have gotten home at five p.m., but due to unforeseen circumstances I didn’t make it back home till seven, then Michael arrived home an hour early from work.

Anyway, the missing person of the week is Arturo Flores Vasquez, who disappeared from the border town of San Ysidro, California in 1998, the day before his birthday. (I ought to do a list of people who disappeared on or very close to their birthdays. Sofia Juarez is another that comes to mind.)

And I had another Executed Today entry that ran yesterday: Edward Hogsden, hanged in 1831. Another child abuse case, although it was sexual abuse in this case. It’s a terrible story, almost as bad as the last one.