Select It Sunday: Myra Lewis

It’s been a bit since I did a Select It Sunday. Sorry. This one was chosen by one I. Can’t-Remember, someone who contacted me on the Charley Project’s Facebook page (which hit 10,000 likes this week! Wee!) This person asked me to write about Myra Lewis, a Camden, Mississippi who disappeared on March 1, 2014, at the age of two.

There’s very little information about Myra, although the Clarion-Ledger did do an anniversary article about her disappearance last month. She just disappeared from her front yard on Mount Pilgrim Road in Camden, a rural unincorporated community. Myra’s mom was going to the grocery store and told Myra and her sisters to go inside, where their father was. This was between 10:30 and 11:00 in the morning.

Myra apparently never made it inside, or if she did, her father never saw her. Because each parent thought she was with the other one, she wasn’t missed for hours.

Me, I have to wonder if she didn’t just wander off. I was trying to get a better idea of what the Camden area was like — the Wikipedia entry doesn’t say much — so I looked at Zillow, a real estate website. Their listings for Camden have a lot of “lots” for sale, with trees and ponds and such. It would be easy for a two-year-old to disappear in such an environment.

For what it’s worth, the police are saying there’s no reason to believe Myra isn’t alive. I hope she is. She wasn’t even two and a half when she disappeared and would probably have no memories of her home and parents.

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7 thoughts on “Select It Sunday: Myra Lewis

  1. Vincent May 1, 2017 / 12:05 pm

    Just a quick note on Jonathan Barmaki. Your description lists him as being “Asian/Hispanic.” Yet his ethnic origins are described as Iranian and Mexican.

    Iran is not an Asian country. Farsi, the language of Iran, is an Indo-European language. If you insist on classifying him by race, then the proper classification is probably “Caucasian” or perhaps “Caucasian/Hispanic,” depending on how much indigenous ancestry his Mexican parent has.

    • Mia May 1, 2017 / 1:34 pm

      I don’t think she’s trying to pigeonhole Jonathan or any other person listed on the site. People with Asian, European and African heritage have differences in the shape of their skulls, a marker that’s very important in case they’re found deceased.

    • Meaghan May 1, 2017 / 2:51 pm

      Iran is in Asia. At any rate it’s certainly not in Europe, or in Africa. I refer to all Middle Easterners as Asian. I’ve thought about saying “Arab” for people like Saudi Arabians, but Iranians aren’t Arab either, so…

      I don’t go by language. Malta is a European country for example, but not too long ago I discovered to my surprise that the Maltese language is mostly derived from Arabic, not from Italian or any other European language.

      It is a bit of a gray area, which is why I made sure to note the exact countries of Iran and Mexico in Barmaki’s distinguishing characteristics. No wonder the California Department of Justice database listed his race as “other.”

  2. Alice May 1, 2017 / 2:28 pm

    That’s interesting. I included Myra Lewis as part of a video I’m trying to create, using the music from Runaway Train. America’s 500 Missing. Tell me if you think you can help, Meghan.

  3. Elizabeth Black May 2, 2017 / 7:15 am

    For next select it Sunday, could you choose Perry Stokes?

  4. Elena May 2, 2017 / 3:19 pm

    When I click on “Four resolved cases” I only see one. Where are the other 3?

    • Meaghan May 2, 2017 / 5:43 pm

      The resolved section is divided into groups of thirty. When I reach thirty, I make a new page. I had to start on Resolved Page 108 last night. The other two cases are on Resolved Page 107, and there’s a link to that at the bottom of the newest resolved page.

      However, several of the cases on Resolved Page 107 are out of order because I accidentally erased the entire page last night. I went into a bit of a panic trying to quickly put it back together. I found an archived version of the page, but that was from April 16, and I had to rewrite all the notices for cases that had been resolved since then. I wrote them all up but they’re a bit out of order now. The cases that got resolved (besides Stephan McAfee) are Allyson Corrales, Sneha Pierce and Emmaly Vickers.

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