Let’s talk about it: Shannon Patrick Ketron

Shannon Patrick Ketron was seven months old when he disappeared from Cordell, Oklahoma on June 17, 1982. I already wrote about him for Flashback Friday nearly two years ago. According to the only witness, Shannon’s mom, the baby was the victim of a bizarre abduction.

Ann Ketron said she was driving with the baby when she had to get something (out of the trunk maybe?) and pulled over to the side of the road. A man stopped and asked her if everything was all right. Then he said she looked like his ex-wife, knocked her unconscious, and took Shannon. Shannon was never seen again and the abductor was never identified.

That’s really weird. To begin with, I’ve never heard of a baby being kidnapped by a strange man. Furthermore, there seems to have been almost no press coverage about this case and very little information is available, and what little there is, is contradictory. I’ve seen claims that Shannon was almost two years old when he was taken, when in fact he was seven months, and I’ve seen the abduction date incorrectly given as July 17, 1982.

Shannon’s dad, Dustin Ketron, was in prison when he disappeared so presumably he’s not a suspect. Ann took a polygraph, but the results haven’t been released.

If Shannon is still alive, he’d have turned 35 last month. Do you think he is? Let’s talk about it.

No med side effects, yay — and other stuff in my boring life

I had previously said I might have to drop out of sight for a bit because I was taking a new medication and might get some bad side effects until my body grew accustomed to it. Well, I’ve been taking it since Tuesday and don’t feel any different physically or mentally: no muscle tremors, no loss of balance, no problems with concentration, no nothing. Yay! Dr. Bruno said it was a “very gentle” drug and I shouldn’t expect side effects; I’m glad he turned out to be right.

I just hope it works. Psychiatric drugs often take weeks or longer to become fully effective. I’m not sure why. I’ve been feeling anxious and miserable all autumn and I’m frankly tired of it. Of course my life has been kind of stressful these last two months. The car wreck, conflicts with Michael’s mom, etc.

Today I started physical therapy for my back (again). Ever since that horrible episode last month my lower back has not been right. I’ve had back pain before but never in this particular spot — the very, very bottom, basically right where my spine begins. Whenever I have to bend over, or twist, or sit down, it hurts. Sometimes it hurts bad enough that I will wince visibly and gasp out loud. So it’s PT again for me.

They did the evaluation today and said my range of motion is pretty good and so it my general strength; the problem is just the pain. They’ve prescribed some gentle exercises to begin with and we’ll go from there. Three times a week for up to six weeks. I go again on Monday. I told the physical therapist about how I have back pain a lot because I spend too much time at the computer working on my website, and gave him one of my business cards. Like most people, he was curious about it, and I gave him the rundown of how it works.

Let’s see…what else. Not much really. I got a new office chair. My previous chair broke after a whopping one year and four months of use. It was really cheap and I suppose you get what you pay for. I like the new one much better; it’s much more comfortable. I’m hoping it will last longer. I purchased the two-year warranty for it, which I suppose guarantees it will break on Day 731. (Speaking of the chair, I don’t understand Facebook. When I posted a photo of the chair on the Charley Project’s Facebook account, it got a “reach” of 3,560 people. Which is a much greater reach than most of the articles I post on there about missing people. Go figure.)

Here’s two selfies I took yesterday. I’m wearing makeup in the pictures; I don’t wear makeup that often but yesterday I was feeling kind of rotten so I thought I’d try to cheer myself up. It did feel nice to look nice. I think I like that shade of lipstick — it’s mauve, I guess. I seem to do better with pink shades than red ones. You can see my natural hair color here, a sort of ash blonde or light brown.

11-15-2016

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*waits for whoever-she-is to comment and tell me I look an old hag and my turtleneck is tacky*

A word about a certain “search and rescue service”

I posted about this on the Charley Project’s Facebook page yesterday, and I thought I’d blog about it too, because frankly it really makes me mad.

In yesterday’s updates I added one Dennis Frank Svoboda, who disappeared in 1996. He’s presumed drowned in a fishing accident. While researching his case I found several articles about International K-9 Search and Rescue Services, which is apparently the only for-profit SAR service in the world. It charges $200 an hour.

It turns out this SAR service is pretty shady. A lot of legitimate SAR services and law enforcement agencies won’t have anything to do with it. In an interview, the founder said it’s because people are jealous of his success, something I find unlikely. He also said his SAR dogs have a 97% success rate and other SAR dogs have only a 20% success rate.

I found a mention of Svoboda on the “drownings” section of its website:

96-668-024(C) 01-25-96 Cowlitz Co. Drowning X (2). Dennis Svoboda and Larry Mansur. Two missing fisherman. Missing X 4 days. Searched their favorite fishing holes. Very cold outside. Snowing in hills. Winds from West 0-5 MPH. Air temp..35f. Water 42F. One found by Valorie in 40 feet of water and one found in 60 feet of water. Grief therapy 1 hour with family after debriefing. (Note) Bodies were moved from their location. One by the current the other by water boat traffic-tug boat towing a barge.

Uh, no. Larry Mansur’s body was missing for months, not four days, before it turned up. And Svoboda is still missing. He’s on NamUs and on the Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Department MP page and now he’s on Charley too.

I posted a comment on the SAR service’s Facebook page, on a post they made boasting of their “successes” (Svoboda was on the list); I said Svoboda had never been found. My comment got deleted.

It’s pretty disturbing. Stay away from these folks.

The way I do things

When I wake up in the morning — or whenever it is that I wake up to start my day — and get on the computer, one of the first things I do after checking my email is check Google News for new articles about missing persons cases. I share the articles on the Charley Project’s Facebook page, and the ones that are of use to me, I bookmark for future use. Once I’m done combing through the news, I usually go back and have a look at the articles I bookmarked and see what I can do with them for the day’s updates.

As I’ve said over and over, what I do is try to put all the available information in one place, so people researching missing persons can go to one spot and find everything, rather than having to read like 20 different articles. But that means it’s ME having to read 20 different articles. I’m a very good, very fast reader, obviously, but if you’re just looking at my cases from the outside you’ve got no idea how much time it can take.

Take the case of Diamond Bynum and her nephew King Walker, for example. I added them on Sunday. The case summary is a short one: their “circumstances of disappearance” section is a mere 161 words long. But to get those 161 words, and the photos and the physical/clothing/medical information, I had to consult six different sources — an MP database, a Facebook page and four news publications — and read, perhaps, ten articles, and sort of boil it all down in my head.

And that was just for two cases — or more like one and a half cases, since the circumstances of disappearance were identical for both. I added eight cases to the Charley Project that day, and updated one. And that was just the daily grind, as it were. There’s a lot of other stuff involved: constantly checking other MP databases for cases to add, purging my outdated cases, trying (and failing) to keep up with my email, maintaining the social media stuff, etc. Also occasionally just plugging name after name into Google or whatever and see if I can get a fish on the line.

I am not complaining. Running this website is something I deeply enjoy, and it’s something uniquely suited to my talents and life circumstances. I’m just trying to say, it’s not exactly easy and it’s not something to undertake lightly. I’m sure many people would have a hard time staying committed. I know I do. From time to time I’ve thought about quitting, but that would be a logistical nightmare and I know I’d deeply regret it.

But I think to myself: that logistical nightmare could happen anyway, even if I didn’t choose to quit. I mean, I was lucky to walk away relatively unscathed after that car wreck six weeks ago. What if I’d been seriously injured, brain-damaged, killed? What then? Who would take care of things? No one, that’s who. There’d be nothing to do but pull the whole thing down, and no one to do it but my nearest and dearest.

I am warming up to the idea of having other people help write cases for Charley. I know the site has really grown too big for me to manage on my own. But I remain apprehensive. One of the many things I am concerned about is the possibility that some well-meaning, talented individuals will volunteer themselves and then change their minds when they realize just what this sort of thing entails.

I’m just thinking aloud right now.

MP of the week: Nicasio Fernandez

This week’s featured missing person is Nicasio Carmona Fernandez Jr., a seventeen-year-old missing from Montclair, California. He disappeared on March 19, 1984, but for some reason he wasn’t reported missing until 1993.

As to what’s happened to him, that’s unclear: the circumstances of his disappearance would seem to indicate foul play is a possibility, but people who knew him reported having seen him alive and well in Montclair and in the Los Angeles area in the nineties.

If he’s alive, I wonder if he even knows he’s listed as a missing person.

Another med change pending

It seems like every time I get my crazymeds changed, I am unable to do anything for awhile, either because I get incredibly fatigued or because my fine motor skills (and some of the gross ones) go to pot.

Well, I saw my doctor today and he’s changed my medicines again. I’m stopping one of my medicines and starting an entirely new one tomorrow, one I’ve never had before.

It had to be done, and perhaps this med change won’t cause any major side effects. I’ve read all sorts of horrible things about it online that make me nervous, but I know if I call the office and voice my fears they’re going to be like “take it anyway, your doctor gave it to you.”

So if I disappear for a week or so, that’s probably what’s happened. But hopefully it’ll be a smooth transition.

Make-a-List Monday: Family abductions of kids who are now adults

This list is for kids who were abducted by parents or other relatives, and are now over the age of 18. In some of these cases, the MP has siblings who were abducted also and are still minors. Many of these children have been missing for a depressingly long time. I did not include cases where they believe the abductor killed the child after taking them.

I should emphasize that just because the kid is now an adult and still hasn’t resurfaced doesn’t mean they want to stay missing or were fleeing an abusive situation. Many times children are lied to by the abductor and told that their left-behind parent is dead, or that the left-behind parent was an abusive, horrible person and they’re better off without them.

Many victims of family abduction are young, below school age, and thus they wouldn’t have much, if any, memories of their former life. Even in cases of older children, it’s still possible to poison their minds against the left-behind parent. You have to consider the idea that children want to believe their parents have their best interests at heart. Especially in a situation where they have no other influences, it can be easy to convince them of things that are not true and alienate them against the other parent.

There’s also the issue of international abduction cases where the child/children were taken to a country (such as, say, Saudi Arabia) where women are not allowed to travel without the permission of a male relative. So, even if they wanted to come back, they can’t.

There is one case I know of where a girl was abducted by her father and taken to Mexico. She was very young at the time and her father told her that her mother was dead or had abandoned her, I can’t remember which. I don’t even remember her name. When the girl was 17, I guess her father’s conscience had been bothering him because he finally told her the truth about what happened, that he had stolen her from her mother and that her mother was alive and looking for her. The girl then traveled to the United States and eventually did locate her mother.

This happened like ten years ago — I know because remember writing about it on Websleuths and I haven’t been active on there in ages. I wrote that I was glad that the father owned up to what he had done and gave his daughter a chance to reunite with her searching mother. Other posters on the forum were angry at him, saying “I can’t believe you’re defending this man, he did something horrible.” Well, I wasn’t exactly defending him, and I freely admit that yes, he did do something horrible. But at least he eventually tried to do right by his daughter and his ex-wife, which is more than can be said for most abductors in such cases.

  1. Jehad Ahmed Abuhamda (was 13, is now 18)
  2. Berania Teresa Agapito (was 11, is now 18)
  3. Wendy Agapito (was 14, now 20)
  4. Gloria Aguilar (was 13, now 21)
  5. Amina Ashraf Al-Jailani (was 9, is now 20)
  6. Layla Ashraf Al-Jailani (was 7, now 18)
  7. Sarah Molouk Amiri (was 3, now 26)
  8. Cameron Jeffrey Anderson (was 12, now 28)
  9. Kyle Nicholas James Anderson (was 9, now 25)
  10. Rachel Marie Anderson (was 13, now 30)
  11. Yareli Marlem Barajas (was 12, now 19)
  12. Anastacia Marie Argentova-Stevens (was 5, now 19)
  13. Emad Ali Ben-Mrad (was 3, now 19)
  14. Shoshana Kaila Black (was 2, now 22)
  15. Reuben Bennett Blackwell II (was 2, now 23)
  16. Halle Patricia Bobo (was 6, now 18)
  17. Jacob Allen Bobo (was 9, now 20)
  18. Ebrahim Bozorgi (was 6, now 23)
  19. Zafar Bozorgi (was 1, now 19)
  20. Miranda Elaine Budiman (was 4, now 22)
  21. Angela Estella Burns (was 1, now 21)
  22. Natasha Alexandra Augusta Carter (was 10, now 26)
  23. Brittani Nicole Dolbear (was 3, now 22; today is her birthday)
  24. Olivia Addison Edwards-Tuttle (was 8 months, now 26)
  25. Sarah Raquel Elsafi (was 9, now 18)
  26. Tariq Ahmed Elsafi (was 12, now 26)
  27. Joseph Zachary Ernst (was 10, now 18)
  28. Marcus Antonio Farina (was 9 months, now 25)
  29. David Eduardo Gosnell (was 3, now 21)
  30. Antonia Guerrero (was 12, now 23)
  31. Stephanie Guerrero (was 13, now 24; tomorrow is her birthday)
  32. Austin Cole Hernandez (was 4 months, now 20)
  33. Ethan James Hernandez (was 2, now 18)
  34. Leonid Jacobson (was 3, now 21)
  35. Jesse Robert Kaslov (was 1, now 19)
  36. Jewel Koranteng (was 2, now 19)
  37. Mario Lopez* (was 6, now 18)
  38. Sandra Lopez (was 11, now 21)
  39. Sarah Anne Lord (was 3, now 22)
  40. Bianca Isabella Lozano (was 1, now 23)
  41. Ezra Lok Lui (was 2, now 19)
  42. Brandon Mema (was 2, now 18)
  43. Ray Preston Morrison IV (was 2, now 21)
  44. Diana Judith Portillo (was 12, now 18)
  45. Soomaiiah Jalaaluddeen Quariishi (was 7, now 23)
  46. Kyle Ivor Rae (was 2, now 22)
  47. Melissa Erin Reiter (was 1, now 25)
  48. Andrea Michelle Reyes (was 1, now 19)
  49. Alejandra Rivera-Romero (was 8, now 20)
  50. Wesley Rivera-Romero (was 6, now 18)
  51. Nadia Rougebianni (was 2, now 18)
  52. Stacy Ann Kathleen Rudolph (was 13, now 29; today is her birthday)
  53. Isabella Saileanu (was 2, now 18)
  54. Domingo Sanchez Gonzalez (was 11, now 19)
  55. Esmit Sanchez Gonzalez (was 15, now 23)
  56. Deborah Lyyn Sanders (was 1, now 34)
  57. Nicolas Marcel Santin (was 12, now 23)
  58. Emily Michelle Sawyer (was 3, now 33)
  59. Adam Osama Shannon (was 4, now 19)
  60. Kamelia Maria Spencer (was 2, now 19)
  61. Caroline Victoria Teague (was 4, now 19)
  62. Bethany Maria Tiner (was 3, now 23)
  63. Gabrielle Torres (was 12, now 21)
  64. Vivian Aileen Trout (was 2, now 22)
  65. Therese Rose Vanderheiden-Walsh (was 5, now 32)
  66. Prathima Venkatesan (was 8, now 18)
  67. Charles Jason Vosseler (was 3, now 33)
  68. William Martin Vosseler (was 2, now 32)
  69. Brianna Christine Warnes (was 2, now 23)
  70. Takoda Tei Weed (was 6, now 18)
  71. Tiffany Susan Westford (was 2, now 25)
  72. Kelly Ann Yates (was 10 months, now 32)
  73. Kimberly Ann Yates (was 3, now 35)
  74. Christopher Louis Zaharias (was 3, now 32)
  75. Lisa Mae Zaharias (was 1, now 30)

*Mario’s case was probably a family abduction; at least it stands to reason that it was. He and his three siblings were in foster care, with Mario and Joel placed in the same home, and the boys vanished together and their biological parents disappeared at the same time. (Mario’s brother has since been found.) He’s still classified as “endangered missing” though, and I don’t think warrants have been issued for his parents.

 

Select It Sunday: David Gionet

David Robert Gionet‘s brother’s fiancee asked me to profile him for Select It Sunday. David was 18 when he disappeared on March 9, 1983, near the campus of the Interlochen Center for the Arts. His family has since found out that, contrary to popular belief (and contrary to what his Charley Project page says as of this writing), he wasn’t actually ON the campus. Here’s a flier I was given with the most updated information and a much better version of David’s photo.

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Needless to say, I’m going to update his case. But while we’re on the subject, can I have some more Sunday suggestions?

A few observations

A friend of mine, not someone involved in the world of MP cases and true crime, sent me an email today to ask if I knew anything about a woman who had disappeared from her area the other day. I replied saying I didn’t really follow cases that recent, but I had Googled the missing woman and reported what I’d found. I added,

Right now the California Department of Justice’s database is classifying her as “voluntary missing,” something her family is taking issue with. I wish I could talk to them and explain that, as far as I can tell, CDOJ classifies missing persons cases pretty much at random. They’ve got a teenager listed as a “runaway juvenile” when she was witnessed jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge.

Yeah, I don’t pay too much attention to CDOJ’s “voluntary missing adult” stuff. I make up my own mind, provided I have information to work with.

Some other MP news today made me think of cases where there is a great deal of suspicion against the missing child’s parents, or the missing adult’s significant other, but not a lot of evidence pointing towards any theory.

I have researched and written about enough MP cases that I think I’m entitled to make this general observation: When the public, and perhaps the police also, have a person of interest in mind like parents or a spouse or whatever, someone close to the MP, a good indicator is to look at the person’s behavior after the disappearance. Let’s say it’s a child and there’s suspicion that the parents did it. From what I have seen, people who are innocent try to keep the case in the public eye, give interviews, put up posters, etc., even at great personal cost to themselves. They want the MP found and if they have to get crucified in the media for that to happen, that’s what they’ll do. Guilty people, on the other hand, tend to hide, desperately hoping the police and the media will shut up and go away.